vegan sources of iron

anonymous asked:

What are good vegan sources of iron that don't cost too much?

A lot of stuff, actually. Here’s a short list:
Lentils
Soy
Broccoli 
Collard greens
Chick peas
Lima beans
Apricots
Black beans
Peas
Any fortified cereal

Vitamin C also helps you absorb iron more efficiently. I usually add a little lemon juice to some part of every meal. 

anonymous asked:

Hi, Tess! When you went vegan, did you went to the doctor to ask him/her about nutrition on a vegan diet or you just got the info from documentaries, books and Internet? BTW I love your videos, you're such an inspiration <3

Just from researching online :) Thank you!!

Nutritionfacts.org - http://nutritionfacts.org/
Mic The Vegan - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGJq0eQZoFSwgcqgxIE9MHw

EGGS ILLEGAL TO BE LABELLED HEALTHY?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtGf2FuzKo4

DAIRY INDUSTRY EXPLAINED IN 5 MINUTES:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcN7SGGoCNI

DAIRY:
http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/dairy/
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/cows-milk-casomorphin-and-autism/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxnBDDqXSjk

PROTEIN:
http://www.theholykale.com/plant-based-protein-chart/
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=vegan+iron+sources&espv=2&biw=1380&bih=725&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiGu9nc6YXLAhXCJ5QKHd1KASUQ_AUIBigB#tbm=isch&q=vegan+PROTEIN+sources

CALCIUM:
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/25-vegan-sources-for-calcium.html
http://drlisawatson.com/40-vegan-calcium-sources
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=vegan+iron+sources&espv=2&biw=1380&bih=725&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiGu9nc6YXLAhXCJ5QKHd1KASUQ_AUIBigB#tbm=isch&q=vegan+CALCIUM+sources

IRON:
http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/iron.php
http://kriscarr.com/blog/plant-based-iron-rich-foods/
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=vegan+iron+sources&espv=2&biw=1380&bih=725&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiGu9nc6YXLAhXCJ5QKHd1KASUQ_AUIBigB

VIDEOS TO WATCH
Earthlings:
http://earthlings.com/

Forks Over Knives:
http://www.forksoverknives.com/

What The Health: http://www.whatthehealthfilm.com/

Cowspiracy:
http://www.cowspiracy.com/

Best speech you will ever hear:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es6U00LMmC4

101 reasons to go vegan:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4HJcq8qHAY

This Video Will Teach You How to Make the Best Vegan Parm

Highly regarded by vegans around the globe, nutritional yeast (lovingly known as “nooch”) is a must-have vegan pantry staple.

And it’s also the base for this incredibly easy and delicious vegan Parmesan alternative.

So there you have it! This tasty mixture will keep in the fridge for a few weeks and is great sprinkled on popcorn, salads, pizza, pasta, and more!

P.S. A serving of nooch (two tablespoons) contains all nine essential amino acids and nine grams of “complete” protein. When fortified, it is also a great source of iron and B vitamins.

Sautéed Veggie Wrap

1 “Indian life” chia wrap
1 mashed avocado
Sauté: Broccoli, kale, chickpeas, orange pepper, red onion, fresh garlic clove, zucchini
Sprinkle with daiya cheese and wrap together!

I can’t get enough of these chia wraps! They are high in fibre, iron and omega’s. Broccoli, kale and chickpeas are also great sources of iron and protein.

anonymous asked:

what do you say to people that use anemia as a reason for not being able to go vegan?

Anemia can make maintaining a healthy vegan diet more difficult, just as it can make maintaining any diet while getting enough iron more difficult. However, being anemic does not preclude a person from going vegan, contrary to popular belief. Many nutritionists actually recommend plant based sources of iron over animal products purely for health purposes. There is no proven advantage to eating animals over eating plants for iron absorption, you don’t miss out on anything. Many vegans have even reported their anemia becoming much less severe after going vegan, and some even report it being cured entirely, though there has not been enough research done on this to advocate a plant based diet as treatment. Usefully though, most of the healthier sources of iron are vegan anyway, this article lists a few of them.

anonymous asked:

hey there ive been vegan for like 4 months now and i went to the doctor and she is afraid im gonna become anemic and she says that i should eat meat again but i am not going to do that so what should i do????

Hi there! How are you eating on a daily basis? 

Dried beans and dark green leafy vegetables are especially good sources of iron, even better on a per calorie basis than meat. Iron absorption is increased markedly by eating foods containing vitamin C along with foods containing iron. Vegans do not have a higher incidence of iron deficiency than do meat eaters. (x)

Here is a table with some vegan foods sources of iron. 

Comparison Table:

Note that the top iron sources are vegan

I totally recommend you to eat more greens along with vitamin C. Do some green smoothies at morning. Try to add as many greens as you can, add Vitamin C and a good source of fat. If you can, drink warm lemon water first thing in the morning, wait for 15 or 30 minutes and have the smoothie, if you’re hungry after that then eat. 

I’ve just started a certification a month ago for Conscious Eating & Living. I have learned how important is to add greens to your diet, specially the morning smoothie. Greens restructure the cells, give them new information, clean your body, gives you the nutrients you need. Please take a look at this article: Green Gold - The Leaves of Life! is kinda long, but worth reading.

Please take care, read the article and come back if any doubt comes out. Hope everything gets better ♥

emmaghindle  asked:

Hi, I was wondering if you could recommend foods that contain vital minerals/vitamins that are good for vegans to eat:)?

Hii! :)

Pay special attention to the following nutrients:

  • Calcium helps build and maintain strong teeth and bones. Dark green vegetables, such as turnip and collard greens, kale and broccoli, are good plant sources when eaten in sufficient quantities. Calcium-enriched and fortified products, including juices, cereals, soy milk, soy yogurt and tofu, are other options.
  • Iodine is a component in thyroid hormones, which help regulate metabolism, growth and function of key organs. Vegans may not get enough iodine and be at risk of deficiency and possibly even a goiter. In addition, foods such as soybeans, cruciferous vegetables and sweet potatoes may promote a goiter. However, just ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt provides a significant amount of iodine.
  • Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. Dried beans and peas, lentils, enriched cereals, whole-grain products, dark leafy green vegetables and dried fruit are good sources of iron. Because iron isn’t as easily absorbed from plant sources, the recommended intake of iron for vegans is almost double that recommended for non vegans. To help your body absorb iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C, such as strawberries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli, at the same time as you’re eating iron-containing foods.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids areimportant for heart health. Diets that do not include fish and eggs are generally low in active forms of omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil, soy oil, walnuts, ground flaxseed and soybeans are good sources of essential fatty acids. When it comes to the amount of omega-3 oil in various seed oils, the chia seed has the highest content, just above kiwi seeds, perilla and flax.
  • Protein helps maintain healthy skin, bones, muscles and organs. Eggs and dairy products are good sources, You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Plant sources include soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Vitamin B-12 is necessary to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may go undetected in people who eat a vegan diet. This is because the vegan diet is rich in a vitamin called folate, which may mask deficiency in vitamin B-12 until severe problems occur. For this reason, it’s important for vegans to consider vitamin supplements, vitamin-enriched cereals and fortified soy products. Also if you own a garden eat unwashed veggies or fruits once in a while, B-12 comes from the earth, but only if it’s a reliable source!
  • Vitamin D plays an important role in bone health.Vitamin D is added to some brands of soy and rice milk, and some cereals and margarines. Be sure to check food labels. If you don’t eat enough fortified foods and have limited sun exposure, you may need a vitamin D supplement (one derived from plants).
  • Zinc is an essential component of many enzymes and plays a role in cell division and in formation of proteins. Plant sources of zinc include whole grains, soy products, legumes, nuts and wheat germ.

anonymous asked:

I'm wanting to cut meat out of my diet and eventually all animal products as a whole, but I don't want to not be getting essential vitamins and minerals that are found in meat.. I don't even know the nutrients that's found in meat can you help me out? :)

Hi there! :) Every single nutrient found in meat is in plant based foods, this are the ones that you need to pay special attention:

  • Calcium helps build and maintain strong teeth and bones. Dark green vegetables, such as turnip and collard greens, kale and broccoli, are good plant sources when eaten in sufficient quantities. Calcium-enriched and fortified products, including juices, cereals, soy milk, soy yogurt and tofu, are other options.
  • Iodine is a component in thyroid hormones, which help regulate metabolism, growth and function of key organs. Vegans may not get enough iodine and be at risk of deficiency and possibly even a goiter. In addition, foods such as soybeans, cruciferous vegetables and sweet potatoes may promote a goiter. However, just ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt provides a significant amount of iodine.
  • Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. Dried beans and peas, lentils, enriched cereals, whole-grain products, dark leafy green vegetables and dried fruit are good sources of iron. Because iron isn’t as easily absorbed from plant sources, the recommended intake of iron for vegans is almost double that recommended for non vegans. To help your body absorb iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C, such as strawberries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli, at the same time as you’re eating iron-containing foods.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids areimportant for heart health. Diets that do not include fish and eggs are generally low in active forms of omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil, soy oil, walnuts, ground flaxseed and soybeans are good sources of essential fatty acids. When it comes to the amount of omega-3 oil in various seed oils, the chia seed has the highest content, just above kiwi seeds, perilla and flax.
  • Protein helps maintain healthy skin, bones, muscles and organs. Eggs and dairy products are good sources, You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Plant sources include soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Vitamin B-12 is necessary to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may go undetected in people who eat a vegan diet. This is because the vegan diet is rich in a vitamin called folate, which may mask deficiency in vitamin B-12 until severe problems occur. For this reason, it’s important for vegans to consider vitamin supplements, vitamin-enriched cereals and fortified soy products. Also if you own a garden eat unwashed veggies or fruits once in a while, B-12 comes from the earth, but only if it’s a reliable source!
  • Vitamin D plays an important role in bone health.Vitamin D is added to some brands of soy and rice milk, and some cereals and margarines. Be sure to check food labels. If you don’t eat enough fortified foods and have limited sun exposure, you may need a vitamin D supplement (one derived from plants).
  • Zinc is an essential component of many enzymes and plays a role in cell division and in formation of proteins. Plant sources of zinc include whole grains, soy products, legumes, nuts and wheat germ.

Also you can check out Vegan Health, their nutrition guides are the best I found so far!

60smom  asked:

I wanted to know what kind of vegan foods carry the same nutrients that meat and dairy have. I want to become a vegan but I have no idea what foods to eat. Sorry I sound ignorant.

The nutrients that meat and dairy gives you, you can find them in all the other foods you already eat: nuts, vegetables, seeds and fruits. I can’t make a list for now because it will take me some time, but here are the nutrients you need to pay attention when going vegan:

  • Calcium helps build and maintain strong teeth and bones. Dark green vegetables, such as turnip and collard greens, kale and broccoli, are good plant sources when eaten in sufficient quantities. Calcium-enriched and fortified products, including juices, cereals, soy milk, soy yogurt and tofu, are other options.
  • Iodine is a component in thyroid hormones, which help regulate metabolism, growth and function of key organs. Vegans may not get enough iodine and be at risk of deficiency and possibly even a goiter. In addition, foods such as soybeans, cruciferous vegetables and sweet potatoes may promote a goiter. However, just ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt provides a significant amount of iodine.
  • Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. Dried beans and peas, lentils, enriched cereals, whole-grain products, dark leafy green vegetables and dried fruit are good sources of iron. Because iron isn’t as easily absorbed from plant sources, the recommended intake of iron for vegans is almost double that recommended for non vegans. To help your body absorb iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C, such as strawberries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli, at the same time as you’re eating iron-containing foods.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids areimportant for heart health. Diets that do not include fish and eggs are generally low in active forms of omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil, soy oil, walnuts, ground flaxseed and soybeans are good sources of essential fatty acids. When it comes to the amount of omega-3 oil in various seed oils, the chia seed has the highest content, just above kiwi seeds, perilla and flax.
  • Protein helps maintain healthy skin, bones, muscles and organs. Eggs and dairy products are good sources, You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Plant sources include soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Vitamin B-12 is necessary to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may go undetected in people who eat a vegan diet. This is because the vegan diet is rich in a vitamin called folate, which may mask deficiency in vitamin B-12 until severe problems occur. For this reason, it’s important for vegans to consider vitamin supplements, vitamin-enriched cereals and fortified soy products. Also if you own a garden eat unwashed veggies or fruits once in a while, B-12 comes from the earth, but only if it’s a reliable source!
  • Vitamin D plays an important role in bone health.Vitamin D is added to some brands of soy and rice milk, and some cereals and margarines. Be sure to check food labels. If you don’t eat enough fortified foods and have limited sun exposure, you may need a vitamin D supplement (one derived from plants).
  • Zinc is an essential component of many enzymes and plays a role in cell division and in formation of proteins. Plant sources of zinc include whole grains, soy products, legumes, nuts and wheat germ.

Visit the website Vegan Health, I highly recommend it because they offer very good explanations about vegan nutrition. :)