vector program

ART MASTERPOST - A great selection of art resources form around the web.

Software

My Personal Selections:

  • Fireworks - From Adobe, but my go-to app for graphics. It fuses bitmap and vector art in on amazing package.
  • Autodesk Sketchbook Pro - Super iPad paint app

The Others

  • Alchemy - Fun for abstract shapes.
  • Brushes - One of the first, pro level paint apps for the iPad.
  • MyPaint - a good art app for unix/linux systems.
  • Queeky - A free, browser-based image app.
  • Procreate - An awesome paint tool for the iPad
  • The GIMP - An open source art app that is good and very similar to Adobe Fireworks.
  • Inkscape - Vector/drawing program meant to be similar to Illustrator.
  • DAZ Studio - 3D modeling.
  • Pixlr - A suite of web-based art apps from Autodesk.
  • Photoshop - The gold standard, but not the best graphics app. Mostly great for bitmaps.
  • Illustrator - The king of the hill in terms of vector art applications.

Anatomy

  • heads from different angles
  • anatomy and rotation of the head
  • human anatomy for artists
  • speed drawing studies
  • nude references
  • hands
  • arm and wing movement 
  • beer belliesbody types
  • noses
  • box and egg/run of the stroke
  • a trick for armproportions
  • body diversity
  • anatomy of the waist
  • feet
  • hands and forearms

Color Theory

  • the psychology of color
  • how to mix skin tones
  • color harmony
  • a ton of colour palettes
  • how to contour/highlight
  • colour meanings
  • how to colour

Drawing

  • Drawing facial expressions
  • Arms (male and female)
  • Kissing
  • Drawing faces tutorial
  • Drawing ears
  • Drawing eyes
  • Drawing hair
  • Draw a 3D room
  • Drawing lips
  • Drawing jeans
  • Drawing hands
  • Drawing wings
  • Drawing hats and other head accessories
  • Drawing heads
  • Drawing the booty and thighs

Expressions

  • emotions and facial expressions
  • expressions from different angles (love this site)
  • body language

Poses

  • figure drawing examples
  • posemaniacs
  • gesture drawing 
  • flexiblity
  • hand poses

Skin tones

  • handy palletpainting skin
  • paint some life into your skin tones
  • ethnic skintones

Color Technique

  • gamut mask tool (very nice!)
  • colour does not have to suck
  • 5 easy ways to improve your colouring
  • fucking gradients, how do they work
  • light and shadow
  • painting crystals
  • achieving a painterly look in SAI 
  • painting forests
  • colour scheme designer
  • kuler (more colour schemes)
  • portrait lighting cheatsheet

Tutorials

  • drawing 101
  • how to paint realistic hair
  • how to paint realistic eyes
  • conceptart.org tutorials
  • creature design
  • folds
  • glasses
  • a pretty extensive general art tutorial
  • how to draw hoods
  • how to draw boobs in shirts
  • how to draw hair
  • how to draw faces
  • another face tutorial
  • how to draw hands
  • how to draw mouths
  • how to draw expressions
  • more expressions
  • cargsdoodle’s body tutorial
  • how to draw arms
  • how to avoid same facing
  • how to draw clothing folds

references

  • drawing references
  • hairstyle references
  • eye references
  • a ton of clothing references
  • ear references
  • kneeling/sitting references
  • kissing references

 

Feline tutorials:

  • The domestic cat body
  • Improving upon (lion) anatomy
  • Realistic lion faces tips
  • Big cat paw tips
  • Canine vs. feline - paws and legs
  • Beginner feline tutorial
  • Guide to big cats
  • Feline comparison
  • Canine vs. feline - facial anatomy
  • Canine vs. feline - chest anatomy
  • Guide to little cats
  • Big cat eyes (could work for other eyes)
  • Spot variation in big cats
  • Big cat studies
  • Feline feet
  • Extremely helpful big cat references
  • Domestic cat references

Canine tutorials:

  • Basic wolf anatomy
  • Skeleton notes on wolf legs
  • The wolf skeleton as a whole
  • The wolf skull and teeth
  • Wolf paw tips
  • Basic canine poses
  • Canine ears and chest
  • Drawing realistic wolves
  • Basic wolf tutorial
  • Wolf paw tutorial
  • Paw pad tips
  • Wolf fur direction
  • Canine vs. feline - paws and legs
  • Canine vs. feline - facial anatomy
  • Canine vs. feline - chest anatomy
  • And this is just an excellent DA for wolf reference images
  • Fluid greyhound studies
  • Detailed canine nose tutorial

Avian tutorials:

  • Bird wing anatomy applied on humanoids
  • Bird wing tutorial (lots of underrated tips)
  • Varying bird wing structure
  • Basic owl anatomy
  • Bird wing vs. bat wing vs. pterodactyl wing vs. human arm
  • Bird wings and flight
  • Various bird wings
  • Eagle facts sheet
  • Bird muscular and skeletal anatomy
  • Some great photograph bird (wing) references
  • Dorsal anatomy of a bird wing
  • Winged people anatomy

Human(oid) tutorials:

Facial features:

  • Excellent expressions tut
  • Altalamatox face tutorial
  • Profile proportions
  • Expression tutorial
  • Virtual lighting studio
  • Various facial and body shapes reference
  • Drawing the nose
  • Human mouths
  • Breaking down the human nose
  • How to draw the ear
  • Jawline and kissing tip
  • The human head at various angles
  • Advice on eyes
  • Nose shapes
  • The human skull and face
  • Facial features
  • Portrait lighting cheat sheet
  • Animating dialogue (mouth movement)
  • A kissing tutorial
  • Expressions photo references
  • Semi-realistic eye tutorial
  • Painting a realistic eye
  • The face in profile
  • The human head at various angles
  • Muscles in the neck and face
  • Breakdown of lips
  • Blocked out human faces
  • Average female faces of the world
  • Expressive eye reference
  • Excellent ear anatomy tutorial
  • Constraining the face
  • The face at various angles
  • Human faces
  • Skull to face tutorial
  • Excellent teeth tutorial. Animalistic, but it works
  • Tips on teeth
  • Colours of the face
  • Photographic mouth/teeth reference
  • Stylized noses and ears

Neck, shoulders, arms, back, and torso:

  • A male shoulder study
  • Muscles in the neck and face
  • Neck and torso tut
  • Male torso anatomy in use
  • Arm shape and muscles
  • Breaking up the male torso
  • Female anatomy patterns
  • Male torso photo reference
  • Over the shoulder poses
  • Shoulder structure (male)
  • Male torso in motion
  • A neat arm trick
  • Detailed arm muscle drawings
  • Male muscle reference
  • Human back tips
  • Movement and muscles of the neck, torso, and arms
  • Simplifying a muscular male torso
  • Drawing boobs
  • Female vs male arms and shoulders
  • Making sure ladies have room for organs and realistic boobs
  • Shoulders vs hips
  • Hands on hips poses
  • Muscles of the arms and shoulders (in motion)
  • Varied male and female torso references

Legs, hips, and feet:

  • Male vs. female waist
  • Female anatomy patterns
  • The human hips
  • Male legs reference
  • A beginner’s guide to knees
  • Feet and shoes tutorial
  • Simplifying the human foot
  • Feet reference drawings
  • Feet, ankles, and shoes
  • Shoulders vs hips
  • Bent legs yes and no’s (female)
  • Hands and feet from cone shapes

Hands:

  • Hand tips and reference
  • Simplifying hands
  • More simplified hands
  • The human hand
  • More hand(y) tips
  • Yet another hands tutorial
  • The fist
  • The hand in motion
  • Hand and feet tips
  • Excellent hand and feet studies
  • How hands grip a sword
  • Hand poses
  • Boxing out the hand
  • Hello more hand refs
  • Hand angle references
  • Correct grip on a pistol
  • Various hand references (with object holding poses)
  • Simple hands, fingers, and nails
  • Hands and feet from cone shapes

Full body and poses:

  • Simplifying human anatomy
  • Understanding anatomy part 1 (follow desc. links for more)
  • A guide to movement: flexibility
  • Pose tutorial
  • Varying the female figure
  • Excellent action and couple references
  • Various athletic builds
  • Proportional height of different positions
  • The human body in perspective
  • Body type diversity
  • Another ladies tutorial
  • Fullbody proportions tutorial
  • Guide to human types
  • Couple pose photo references
  • Practice figure drawing (animals as well)
  • How weight sits on different (female) bodies
  • Kneeling and sitting stock references
  • Constructing poses and the line of action
  • Varying your body types (female)
  • Large source of female anatomy references

Hair and skin:

  • Various types of hair
  • Drawing hair
  • Skintone palettes
  • Variation of colour throughout the skin
  • Painting skin
  • Skin tutorial
  • Skin undertones (men)
  • Drawing freckles
  • Drawing different types of hair

Other:

  • Bird wing anatomy applied on humanoids
  • Animal feet on a human figure
  • Various human bone studies
  • Interesting mythical creature skeletons with humanoid anatomy
  • Winged people anatomy

Dragon tutorials (and bat wings):

  • Anatomy of the Western dragon
  • Dragon wing tips
  • Dragon wing tutorial
  • Dragon anatomy
  • Dragon tutorial
  • Bat wing anatomy tutorial

Equine tutorials:

  • Basic horse (back) reference
  • The equine skeleton
  • Horse anatomy and pointers
  • A good, large collection of horse stock references
  • Skeleton of a horse and its rider
  • Horse hooves
  • Skeletal and fluid horse studies

Cervine tutorials:

  • Basic deer anatomy
  • Deer skeleton drawing
  • Deer musculature
  • Deer skeleton
  • Fluid deer studies
  • The Big Book of Drawing: deer
  • Reindeer noses

Ursine tutorials:

  • Fantastic bear anatomy/poses references
  • Basic bear structure
  • Bear anatomy tutorial

Miscellaneous animal tutorials:

  • Sheep vs. goats
  • Anteater studies
  • Chimp studies
  • Asian elephant skeletal drawing
  • Animating four legged creatures
  • Various animal studies from an animation aspect
  • Drawing rats
  • A tutorial on creature design
  • Snake mouths
  • Amazing teeth tutorial

Background and objects tutorials:

  • Griffsnuff background tut part 1 (second in desc.)
  • Tree tutorial
  • Realistic gems tut
  • Water tutorial
  • General water tutorial
  • Drawing crystals
  • Drawing bows
  • Painting rocks
  • Parts of a saber (other swords linked in desc.)
  • Analyzing key and contrast/time of day/etc
  • Corner-pin perspective distortion
  • Using three cubes to make a street view
  • Cloud tutorial
  • A beautiful flower tutorial
  • A simple but effective tree tutorial
  • Drawing mechanical objects
  • Multiple tree tutorials
  • Perspective tricks
  • Weapon and shield accessory tutorial
  • Background painting tips (blocks and angular objects)

Clothing tutorials:

  • Fabric tutorial
  • Clothing folds part 1 (second in desc.)
  • Drawing hoods
  • Drawing jeans
  • Hat on human figure reference
  • Armor
  • More hat on figure references
  • Different shirt collars
  • Collars, sport backs, vests, and pants
  • Draperies and costumes
  • Making colourful fabric patterns
  • Baseball cap reference
  • A ton of clothing references
  • A boatload of well-organized clothing refs
  • Feet and shoes tutorial
  • Dressing Rosalind Lutece (older female clothing)
  • Feet, ankles, and shoes
  • Hats and how to draw them
  • Clothing folds tutorial
  • Drawing clothing wrinkles
  • A breakdown of medieval armor
  • Drawing hoods

General painting, drawing, and style tips:

  • Altalamatox digital painting walkthrough
  • Simple fur tutorial
  • Realism painting tutorial (human subject)
  • Excellent colour tutorial
  • Painting a wolf (good fur painting visual)
  • Photoshop brushes tut
  • Basics of Photoshop tutorial
  • Another digital painting tutorial
  • Common digital painting mistakes
  • Colour and light
  • Soft cel-shading tutorial
  • Various types of hair
  • Colour tips and the mood it expresses
  • Composition tips
  • Lighting and colour tips
  • Shadows
  • Another composition tut
  • Simple colouring via overlay
  • From paper to digital
  • Painting gold
  • Colour palette turtles
  • Excellent fur painting tutorial
  • Skin painting tips
  • Colouring black and white pictures
  • Creating a colour palette with MS Paint
  • Obeying screen direction
  • Analyzing key and contrast/time of day/etc
  • The coil technique
  • Colour adjustment tips
  • Making flat colour pieces look gorgeous
  • Blending with hard brushes
  • Outlining in SAI
  • Uncommon information regarding colours
  • Compositional balance
  • Visual algorithms
  • Gesture over anatomy
  • Disney Chris Sanders’ style tips
  • Design, colour, and value
  • Decent art without lining or shading
  • Varied shots of the human figure
  • Cinematography of the Incredibles
  • Giving characters personality with poses and expressions
  • The main shapes of character design
  • Tamberella’s shading tutorial
  • SAI watercolour tutorial
  • Choosing interesting colours (by PurpleKecleon)
  • Local colour and dramatic lighting
  • Silhouettes and line of action

Hand and wrist health:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome information
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome exercises
  • Wrist, hand, and finger stretches video
  • Another video with good hand exercises

anonymous asked:

Hello, yes, hi, I recently found your art and account and I love what you do. I'm turning 14 in April and I've asked for a drawing pad, but I have no idea how to use one as of yet. Have you got any tips or anything? Because I've wanted to try digital art for a while and your art makes me want to even more lmao. Thanks! - B.A.

BOI OH BOI DO I GOT SOME TIPS FOR U <3

(I’m not sure what kind of comp you’re going to be using, so I’ll list for both.)

FIRST: Drawing Programs; the free and the great.

-Firealpaca: Lightweight drawing program. I draw Recovery using this! It’s easy on the RAM if you have a weak comp/are paranoid about yours like I am, it is mainly for basic comic making, and has all the basic brushes you need (pen/pencil/airbrush/symmetry/etc). You can add your own brushes as well but they’re p basic settings. Has basic Animation/Gif making as well using Onion Mode! Layout is a piece of cake. Please note that If you leave it open for a week it’ll crash on you, even if you haven’t anything on it at the moment, and sometimes the brush sensitivity just stops working so you just have to close and then open it again. (Also I have no idea how to update it aside from deleting it completely and just downloading the new version from scratch, so thats a thing.) Mac/Windows

-MedibangPaint: This is basically FireAlpaca But Better. Has tons of screen tones, brush patterns, and tools. I don’t use it much because I’m used to FA’s layout and get confused with the the placement of tools in here, so if you can I highly suggest just going with this first. Also has basic animation/gif making! Has storage for the website as well, and you can upload more preset brushes. It’s v anime. This program has waaay more in terms of basically everything, so it just takes more RAM. NBD, you don’t have to have every brush downloaded from the storage ^u^. Mac/Windows

-Clip Studio Paint: Okay this one isn’t free, it’s a pricey one, HOWEVER once a year they take the price way fuckin down by at least 75%. Sign up for the email list and it’ll let you know when that precious day comes. It’s how I got it @u@, around christmastime? This program is basically MedibangPaint On Steroids. I do all of my digital-yet-tradition-style-painting on here! The brushes all have some neat af settings to play with, you can make your own brushes, has tons of screen tones, pre-made panels, and settings. You can save projects as basically anything you need, is a hardy program that almost never crashes, and It’ll take a nice chunk of space on your comp depending on how much memory you have but hey, its worth it. It’s much more complex layout-wise than the other two here, but you get used to it after playing around and watching tutorials haha.

-Mischief: It’s a 25$ app, has like four brushes and five layers only but is vector-based with an endless canvas. Not really worth having unless you like the vector thing. UP TO YOU. I spent forever with this one doing all that homestuck stuff, so it’s not really bad so much as it is a basic bitch. Mac

-MyPaint: I used this a bunch when I still did digital art on my windows laptop before I upgraded to a Mac. It’s easy on the comp and has plenty of brushes and settings. You can also get brush packages if you don’t feel like you have enough that comes with the program! Also has endless canvas; pretty sure you can just select an area and then export as is. I barely remember the rest but It’s pretty great. Windows/MacPorts(which I hate)

-GIMP: I hate this thing. I cannot figure it out for the life of me. It’s got loads of shit though, can handle layers, has plenty of brushes, and can do basic animation/gifs if you ever figure it out. Windows/mac

I’ve heard good things from paint tool SAI and Krita as well, but have never used them myself.

***You can always pay through the nose/use a student discount for the photoshop series and pay that shit monthly, those fuckers have literally everything, but I am a cheap college kid making minimum wage with a car payment; I’d rather just pay once/not at all.

TABLETS: treat that shit like a newborn babe 24/7

-I have literally only ever owned a Wacom Intuos4. It has lasted me six years, and at least five moves across many miles. I broke one of the cord ports the day I opened it by holding it wrong, have one left, and now treat it like it’s going to die if the cord moves badly. Please be aware that if you break both ports, you better either sodder it back together yourself or upgrade to smth else because it costs about as much as the tablet itself was bought at to be fixed. Good news, though, it comes with at least six extra pen nibs, has programable buttons on the side (that I have never bothered to use) and a scroll bar in case you’re too lazy to use the keyboard (…I don’t really use that either unless I’m just scrolling through tumblr LMFAO).

-I would die for a Cintiq.

HOT TIPS: its useful.

-most of the programs listed use the same keyboard shortcuts. MEMORIZE THEM. It’s pretty easy, since you’ll use em a lot. [cntrl/cmmd+T] lets you resize what you just drew on that layer, and [cntrl/cmmd+z] is undo. I use those the most, for obvious reasons.

-vector-based programs are pretty great because when you resize an image it looks prefect. You can’t do that with a program that isn’t, so I just resize the base roughdraft and draw the lineart again on the layer above so I don’t get weird JPEG quality lines.

-You can use a ruler with your tablet, just slap it on and go, but honestly most programs have settings for that. just use those.

-You can also trace stuff on your tablet, so long as the paper isn’t too thick. I just scan/take a photo and then open it up in the program, though. much easier.

-SAVE CONSTANTLY. Art programs like to crash on you, even when they’re hardy and you have a good comp. make it a habit to quick save your work.

-Use a desk and have good posture. You’ll be able to draw a hell of a lot longer if you do. I personally keep fucking up my knees by sitting on my legs as I work out of habit, and don’t actually have a desk chair. Keep your screen at eye level and at a fair distance to prevent eyestrain and also neck-strain haha

-Chances are you won’t be used to the tablet right away. Most places you buy from say it’ll take a couple of months to get used to how weird it is to draw while not looking at your own hand, so don’t be frustrated If your drawings look a bit off at first.

-if you draw at least one thing every day, by the end of the year you’ll have improved exponentially. I literally made this blog to make myself draw once a day.

-don’t be afraid to check out speedpaints and tutorials. It’s always good to get more familiar with the program you’re using and new techniques previously unconsidered.

-get familiar with clipping layers. They are insanely useful; you clip one layer to the one below and then when you draw it only shows up on the drawing of that layer below. Shit is a godsend if you’re bad at coloring in the lines/lazy. The bucket tool is also really useful, and you can adjust the expansion by pixel so you don’t miss anything between the lines.

-experiment with your brushes, shit be fun af

-warmup your wrists before and after drawing. prevent swollen veins and such. dont want hand pain/numbness, its reaaaaally bad.

—basically if your hands hurt stop for the day.

-PNGS are for internet, JPEGS are for printing/fucking with quality (cough hack homestuck)

-resolution doesn’t have to be much more than 350 dpi if its just going to be on a webpage. Maximize that shit if you’re going to be printing, though. Especially if you put stuff on redbubble.

-DeviantArt has this thing called Sta.sh where you can dump art, keep it in perfect quality and just share it with certain people with a link instead of all of the website. Great for storing commission pieces, its the only reason I have DA in the first place.

-you get a different audience depending on what site you use for posting art, so keep that in mind for the kind of feedback you want.

-after awhile of drawing using a tablet, you may lose patience/forget that in traditional art there isn’t an undo button lmfao It’s cool; you don’t have to choose one over the other or anything.

-Honestly you can work around almost anything. You just invent new ways and techniques for yourself and you’ll do just fine.

Aaaaand that’s all I got for today! Thanks for sticking around <3

General update about my career/animation

I know I’m not like… obligated to post this or anything but I took a short, 3-week gig at a studio working on a pilot for adult swim (Chuck Deuce, it’s about a surfer with amnesia and a mythical taco truck, naturally) which is cool cause 1. I like the studio, I’ve worked foe them before, 2. Money is nice, and 3. It’s only 3 weeks which is a good little chunk of studio work to do before I get antsy to start working on w2h2. In regards to that, I’m still in this weird in-between phase cause I need to record dialogue and that’s the only part of the process that actually requires me to coordinate with people which takes a lot of time SOOO!

Anyway that’s what’s up with me! Just thought I’d share!

Also I fucking hate Flash so much I swear to god, like I GET why studios like it, but when you’re making a show with like intentionally jagged/rough line quality in a vector program you’re just making gigantic fuckin files that the computer has a hard time playing back, like….   hhhhhhhhhhhhaaggghhkkk…  I’m mostly just a big whiny baby who doesn’t like industry-standard programs ‘cause I’ve pampered myself with fuckin’ indie software from France

Supply Recommendations for Graphic Design Students

Hello! It’s been a while since I’ve posted something like this… so bear with me! It was requested by an anon that’s entering a university as a Graphic Design major, so here are some supplies I recommend and why! (I may do a spoken and visual extended version as a video, so let me know what you guys think!)

(disclaimer: this is my opinion and I haven’t tried everything in the world, so if you have your own recommendations definitely reblog and say so in your caption! I’d love to check out your favorite supplies!)

Categories include:

  • Day-to-day supplies
  • The Big One$
  • Projects
  • Some Fun and Fancy Stuff

DAY - TO - DAY SUPPLIES

Sharpie pens and markers

  • Cheap-ish
  • Reliable
  • You can find them basically anywhere
  • Great for black and white abstractions/sketches with different marker thicknesses
  • They also have pretty colors for note-taking!

X-Acto Knife

  • Cuts in a straight line
  • Replaceable blades
  • In most art and office stores and even in places like Walmart
  • If you cut something sticky and ruin your blade, just replace it!
  • Goes with a ruler to cut in a straight line

Masking Tape

  • Holds things down without ripping it
  • Keeps prints rolled up
  • Keep one with you or at home

USB Drive

  • Always have a USB drive ready for use!
  • Turn in files, take files to the printer, or even just taking files to a different machine to work on is always a possibility. 
  • If you make it a habit to keep it on you, then you won’t forget it on the days that really matter.

Noise canceling headphones (or at least ear buds)

  • Rowdy classmate ignorer
  • Helps blast music in your ears to help you focus
  • Marshmallow buds that go in your ears works best for this

A drink that makes you happy

  • That morning coffee before a 9AM studio 3-hour class, or that water bottle during an afternoon session can really help you out. 
  • Helps keep you going!
  • I know it sounds small, but your mood definitely affects your productivity!

A sketchbook (any kind will do!)

  • Literally, can by any paper quality, based on what you usually draw with or sketch with (like to use marker? Either have an extra page behind it or get marker paper)
  • Any price, any color, any size (try to aim for letter-size/A4)
  • Make sure it fits with what you usually carry around (backpacks can hold a 9″x12″, but purses would carry a Moleskine size or smaller)
  • Have 15 minutes before English starts and you thought of something? Take out that handy dandy sketchbook! Bored in said English class? Handy dandy sketchbook strikes again!

Notebook for notes

  • More than just for typical note taking!
  • Good for recording feedback
  • Track any last-minute changes to projects or deadlines
  • To-do lists will help understand what’s due next class and not get super anxious!

Metal cork-backed ruler

  • A great companion for that X-Acto knife!
  • Cork back helps not slide around
  • Metal means you can’t accidentally carve off the edge (like you would a plastic or wooden ruler)
  • Found in most art stores and can get pricey for bigger ones, but if you take care of it then it’ll last forever
  • Make sure to get at least two sizes (a longer one for trimming cover sheets for 16″x20″ mounts and a smaller one-foot ruler for trimming business cards and smaller things like that)

Post-it notes

  • Great for making notes on things that you don’t want to directly mark. 
  • Good for just keeping in mind anything you don’t want to forget (especially if you stick them to your laptop, they’ll be hard to miss).

Prisma Markers

  • These art markers are my personal favorite. 
  • You’ll hear all kinds of brands, preferences, and prices. 
  • Copics are nice and are very aesthetic, but they’re also about $7-$8 per marker. Concept markers from Jerry’s Artarama are very cheap at about $2 per marker, but the colors on their caps are sometimes misleading, and Prisma Markers are a happy medium at about $4 - $5 per marker. 
  • They’re at most art stores 
  • For me, they’re a happy medium price-wise and I like working with them. (Concept markers maybe I’d get the black because it’s cheaper)

Binder clips

  • Keep sketches and randomly sized and trimmed papers together
  • I prefer binder clips over paper clips because they can hold more and group things nicely
  • You can also hang things with these if you want on a thumbtack

Hair Ties

  • Keeps hair out of the way when creating mock-ups that include glue and X-acto knives
  • Rolls things up
  • Groups things up (markers and other utensils)
  • Cheap and effective!
  • Rubber bands are a little meaner, especially to hair or trying to get them off a long paper roll.

Circle Tool

  • Basically, something that makes perfect circles. 
  • This can either be a circle template, a compass, or some other device that you find that makes different sized circles. 
  • You can go cheap on these

The Toolbox

  • All these little things that I keep mentioning to bring with you need to be contained somewhere
  • I like putting what I’m using for a current project in a toolbox and bringing that to school.
  • I suggest going with something that’ll fit in a backpack or that you don’t mind carrying around.
  • Really only carry it if you think you’ll need it.
  • You can carry a smaller version of typical tools (pens, pencils, markers, scissors, x-acto, etc.) and leave the rest at home, too.

The Baggage

  • Not the emotional kind, but the one that carries all of these crazy supplies I’m recommending. 
  • In university, you don’t have all of your graphic design classes in one day (I would hope), so having a typical backpack works fine for the smaller supplies. 
  • If a project is due the next day and you’re planning to work at the school and you need to bring everything, then I highly suggest a rolling backpack!
  • Don’t kill your back!! Messenger bags only work if you’re not bringing much, otherwise, do a backpack (or a rolling one).

THE BIG ONE$

Laptop

  • Almost all graphic designers will tell you to use a Mac, but of course, not all graphic designers can afford one.
  • If you can afford a Mac, I’d recommend it.
  • If you can’t afford a Mac, go with a cheaper alternative, but not TOO cheap. It still needs to last 4 years and run all of your programs.
  • Wait until you actually need to buy one (that way you can get the latest models or earlier models at cheaper prices).

External Hard Drives (BACK EVERYTHING UP!)

  • I would even say have at least two (current semester and archive(s))
  • You never know when previously mentioned laptop may die, malfunction, or wipe everything.
  • Keep a back-up for sending to competitions, putting in portfolios, and just for safe keeping.
  • KEEP IT ORGANIZED. You need to know what you have and don’t have so you don’t “double save” something in two separate folders.

A decent phone with decent camera quality

  • Nowadays most people do have this phone already on them, but if you’re one of the low-budget phone holders, then I highly suggest to get a higher quality phone.
  • Picture taking for process photos can actually be done with a phone camera if it’s good enough, you can just fix things up in photoshop. 
  • Having a decent phone will let you also use helpful and productive apps such as camscanner, schedule makers, and Adobe apps
  • Raising your mood with a higher quality of life will help raise productivity!
  • If you can’t open snapchat without it force closing then you miss out on your friend’s lives or whenever they get an update on a project and you don’t. Social media can honestly be helpful sometimes as people post their process online!

Drawing tablet

  • Wacom works well enough for me!
  • You don’t have to go super expensive with all the bells and whistles for this… you just need something that draws.
  • These can get a little pricey (mine being at $90 and I got one step-up from the cheapest one at the time)
  • You don’t absolutely need a tablet, but it is very handy.
  • If you don’t do illustration often I would not recommend it.
  • You can also hold off on getting a tablet and just hand-draw something, scan it, and fix it in whatever program (or vectorize/image trace in illustrator and mess with it that way)

PROJECTS

Tracing paper

  • Helps trace things when abstracting
  • Covers mounted work with a protective sheet
  • I prefer the rolls, but they’re way more expensive than the 9″x12″ pad (maybe not per foot, but it’s initially more expensive)

Spray mount/Adhesive spray

  • One way to stick two things together
  • You need a lot of space and throw away paper under what you’re spraying
  • You’ll definitely get all of it everywhere (which is good if you want to make sure corners don’t stick up on a mounted piece, but it’s bad if your garage floor is suddenly sticky)

Liquid cement

  • Another way to stick things together and is a little more forgiving. 
  • Elmer’s brand is the one that I have, and basically, if you mess up or “over-glue” something, you can rub the excess off (like you would the typical white Elmer’s glue).
  • When you’ve rubbed it off, it basically becomes those little gray things that erasers produce that you can just brush away. 
  • It comes with a designated brush attached to the lid on the inside (super convenient) and it’s easy to apply and store (smaller bottle than the adhesive spray can).

Portfolio case

  • For when you’re carrying larger pieces from one place to another (such as a mounted piece or a large editorial) like turning in your final presentation of your project.
  • You can get a big fancy one if you really want to, but at least get the bare minimum to carry something from one place to another without it getting folded or wet. (especially you commuters/bus-riders)

SOME FUN AND FANCY STUFF

The big paper cutter

  • Even I don’t have this one, but whenever I use the one at school or at FedEx it makes trimming things down so much easier! 
  • You line it up, you drag the blade across, and then you’ve got a perfectly straight line. 
  • Again, if you can afford the money and space for it I recommend it, but my school provides one for us.
  • It’s kind of one of those things that you don’t NEED if you have an X-acto knife, but it speeds things up a bit

High-quality camera

  • Similar to the phone concept… taking nice photos of your work is always a plus. 
  • The camera I would reserve for mock-up photos for submitting pieces or getting photography for an editorial work. 
  • Someone in your class ought to have one that you can borrow (and maybe even the program will offer one to borrow), but it’s always good to have your own things.
  • Also, being able to stage your own photos instead of photoshopping mock-up templates always feels more authentic and looks better in a portfolio. (you’re not the only one looking up Photoshop mock-up templates in the design world)

Light table

  • You can either buy one or make one (easier than you think)
  • Very helpful when you’re tracing! 
  • This is the most useful when you’re doing abstractions or you’re trying to refine hand-drawn ideas. 
  • You can make one with a shadow-box frame and some LED lights. 
  • Again, not necessary since programs might actually have some at school that you can borrow.

A second monitor

  • Web design!
  • Programs like Brackets do live-preview, so when you code the changes apply immediately to a chrome preview window, so seeing the changes as you code is helpful! 
  • Putting up inspiration or just other documents to keep in mind on the other screen makes things easier to work with.

Fancy keyboard with custom keys

  • This one was actually a recommendation from my boyfriend (who is a tech geek). 
  • Basically, there are keyboards that you can map shortcuts to specific keys on the keyboard. 
  • There are some shortcut keys that you’ll use a million times in a project and if you feel that a function key being assigned to it would be easier instead, and you have money to splurge, this is the keyboard to go with! 
  • This is totally unnecessary, but could be lots of fun and helpful!

iPad and Apple pen

  • Digitally drawing on a tablet with a stylus can be good for digital note taking or just drawing in general (as an alternative to the drawing tablet). 
  • My professor uses his for sketch notes (which is always fun) and sometimes I see people doing illustrations straight into the tablet or just concepts. 
  • Sketching concepts digitally allows you to put down ideas quickly, but also be able to save them without having to worry about scanning or taking pictures of the drawings. 
  • Another splurge option that obviously has other uses than this, but is completely unnecessary.

MORE Prisma Markers

  • Remember when I said Prisma Markers before?
  • You really only need a basic color set and maybe a gray set. Any more than that then you’re falling into a fun and fancy category for supplies. 
  • They’re not the cheapest things in the world, but using markers definitely brings your sketches up a level versus pencil or black and white sketches.
  • It’s also good for making preliminary color schemes and other illustrations. 
  • Have several blacks because those are usually the first marker to go dry.

That’s all I got! I hope that helped and I’m sorry it was so long, I tried to condense… but I’ll make a visual/audio version that might be easier to digest!

Kainda and her wolf good times

(Full size gif won’t work… Had to post this 3 times to get it to work, sorry for the spam)

About forever ago, This video popped on my wall and I just HAD to animate Kainda (my hunter) and her pup wolf doing the same.

I nearly gave up on this. I hadn’t animated since 2011 and cleaning animation in sketchbook pro is not the same as cleaning in a proper Vector based program. But hey. Sketchy animation is always fun.

the name of the video is  ANNEKA & LARGE GREY WOLF - WOLVES - WOLFGIRL

Bonus :

tinee tiny gif

2

Korrasami WIP pt.7 inspired by the lovely March of Progress fanfic by @threehoursfromtroy

In this edition: The final recolor of our two gals, and my redraw of the airbending. Because I’m a perfectionist and wanted the airbending to actually be smooth curves, I used inkscape (a vector graphics program) to create bezier curves. 
Next: the background! :)

anonymous asked:

Sorry if this has already been answered before but what program do you use to create your art?

I mostly use Pixaki, a pixel app for iPad.

But since I don’t do super complex animations/spriting/game design, what I do can be accomplished with pretty much any raster (that is, not vector) drawing program.

My very first pixel art was done in Superpaint on an ancient macintosh! (That’s probably not helpful information for you, but I just took a trip down memory lane.)

Anyway, I like Pixaki a lot.

anonymous asked:

What do you use to draw your sigils for the pictures you post? Did that make sense? Can I English?

I think I understand. You want to know what program I create them in right? Well, I use Inkscape. It’s a free to download vector drawing program. And this post will explain a little more of the specifics of what I do in the program.  

camiebtheartist  asked:

What are the pixel dimensions for Danger Vision? I recently started a web comic and 900x4000 is too huge for my level of patience(sp).

Iv’e used this kablam template for the past 5 years: 

It’s good to work big just in case you ever want to print anything later on. Otherwise, you’d have to do redraws later at a higher dpi for printing. Better safe than sorry ;)

If you can manage to draw your comic in a vector program, then size and dpi wont matter. I used to draw in Flash cs3 when I started Danger Vision. At the time, it was drawn on a netbook and it couldn’t handle a 300 dpi file in photoshop.

anonymous asked:

How to you change from bitmap to vector or vise versa?

FireAlpaca is purely a raster (bitmap) paint program, it does not have any vector features (well, except the Curve snap, which is a vector-like ruler or guide) and will not convert to or from vector.

If you want to work with vector features or conversion, I suggest you have a look at Inkscape (a very capable vector editor with a bitmap tracing feature based on a potrace implementation - automatic tracing converts a raster/bitmap image to vector). Another program worth a look is Krita, which has both raster and vector features. Both programs will have somewhat steeper learning curves than FireAlpaca.

-Obtusity