value you

Taehyung probably walks into like the airport Gucci shops while traveling and drops tens of thousands of dollars and everyone’s looking at this young, ostentatious, beautiful bitch like hmmmm ok go off sir

there really is a tumblr discourse rhetoric hole that people, and disturbingly a large amount of very young people, jump down into. a place where people cease to be real people, concepts cease to have real life applications, and reality itself warps away into a mess of rhetoric and useless words thrown around for no particular reason other than it equates to status in a virtual reality to do this.

internet activism and social justice are good, necessary things; but the moment that you stop taking into consideration the offline effects and applications of your speech and behavior, when you stop valuing the off-tumblr goals for that activism, when you stop seeing things and people as real but as only concepts or tools in a debate or rhetoric, your activism not only ceases to be meaningful; it becomes a dangerous thing in itself.

activism is not a performance. it’s not a manipulation of words to see how many people you can get to agree with you and/or applaud you. it is a practical effort for positive change. if you can’t remember that, you’re not doing activism. 

He’s never thought of Hannibal as being capable of love. ‘Cause like most of us he probably had love put off on a kind of pedestal, as an idea, a more perfect thing, as he made the awful realization ‘Oh crap, maybe this thing I’m feeling is like love’. It’s so dirty and awful and… you know… I don’t know. I’m basically making this up on the spot, but that would be my answer for why he might not have arrived at or realized that thought. Because look at Hannibal and you could be like… nice suits, great kitchen, great conversations, nice hair, you know, but you wouldn’t go anything like… ‘Wow, what a loving guy’.
—  Hugh Dancy about why Will didn’t realize that Hannibal was in love with him sooner than Season 3
10

happy birthday, colin andrew firth!
~ 10th of september, 1960 ~

Don’t schedule important events on major Jewish holidays

A lot of things get scheduled on major Jewish holidays, in a way that prevents Jews from being able to participate. This needs to stop. 

If you’re in charge of scheduling things like:

  • Protests
  • Conferences
  • Public school orientations
  • College orientations
  • Exam schedules
  • Field trips
  • Other important events

Please avoid scheduling on major Jewish holidays. The most important ones to avoid are:

  • Rosh Hashana
  • Yom Kippur
  • The first two nights of Passover 

These holidays are at slightly different times each year, because the Jewish calendar is lunar. Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are in the fall, Passover is in the Spring. You can check when they are at hebcal.com, and hebcal.com also has a calendar you can subscribe to that says when the holidays are.

Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur are the times at which Jews who don’t go to synagogue at any other time of year go. (In the same way that some Christians only go to church on Easter and Christmas). They are also major family holidays, even for people who are otherwise secular. Yom Kippur is a 25 hour fast (from both food and water) and most people who observe it are pretty wiped out immediately afterwards. 

The first two nights of Passover are when Jewish families hold Passover seders. It’s a major family holiday, even for people who do not consider themselves religious and never go to synagogue at all. Nearly all Jewish families have some sort of seder. 

It is considerate to also avoid scheduling important events that would require travel on the day before and after these major holidays. It is critical to avoid scheduling events on the holidays themselves.

There are other Jewish holidays that will create conflicts for some Jews, but they’re not as important to most Jewish people. 

tl;dr: If you value Jewish participation and solidarity with Jews, it is critically important to avoid scheduling important events on on Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur, and the first two nights of Passover.

  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of notes doesn’t mean it’s not good.
  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of reviews doesn’t mean it’s not good.
  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of favorites doesn’t mean it’s not good.
  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of kudos doesn’t mean it’s not good.
  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of follows doesn’t mean it’s not good.
  • Just because your fic doesn’t get a lot of comments doesn’t mean it’s not good.

Don’t make the mistake of associating popularity with quality.

8

female awesome meme; 5/10 ladies who deserve better: tris prior (the divergent series)
“sometimes it isn’t fighting that’s brave, it’s facing the death you know is coming”

anonymous asked:

Oh my stars your art is amazing!!! Do you think maybe you can make a shading tutorial sheet? owo

Hey there Anon! Sure thing! I’ll do my best to explain the process of how I usually do things in regards to coloring and shading. I’m not the greatest at Explaining, so I’ll do my best to keep things as crystal clear as possible!

Step 1: Lineart
I’ll start with Lineart purely because this step is important to the coloring process in one regard, and that is making sure the entire line layer is closed without any holes. Even the smallest little gap will make the selection process hard later, and we don’t want that. So the cleaner lineart you have, the better. I’m going to go ahead and use my Monster Hunter Generations Huntress for this.

Step 2: Selection
Either in Photoshop or SAI or whatever you use, click outside your character and any other negative space surrounding them. This means…basically anything that’s not your character. Then go to Selection > Inverse and invert the selection. You should have something similar to what I have below. This makes it so much easier to add colors without having to worry about all the little nooks and crannies that could mess the cleanliness of the drawing up real bad.

Step 3: Flat Base
Create a new layer beneath your line layer with the selection still active. This will be our color layer. Remove the visibility of the line layer, and fill the remaining “Silhouette” with a dark base color. This makes those nasty corners look a bit cleaner, as sometimes if there is a lighter color your computer will want to make them stand out pixelated. Again, this is just for cleanliness beneath the line layer. Turn your line layer back on, as they will now act as barriers for the fill bucket tool. Make sure the entire silhouette is filled, and that no lines were accidentally selected! You want a see a completely filled and flat color if you turn the line layer off.

Step 4: Flat Colors
At this point you can lock the transparency of your Color Layer, and go ham. Either with the pen or a fill bucket, figure out how you want to color your character and add in the flat colors. Notice I’m on the same layer as the Base that we made. This is so those lines still play nicely with one another. Clean up where necessary.

Step 5: Analogous Color Gradient
Well, we don’t really want our character to be too flat, do we? This is where the color wheel becomes your best friend. Select similar colors with the Magic Wand (like I’ve done her skin tone here) and using the color wheel, choose an analogous (that means “close by” in color wheel terms) color to add a bit of depth to the color. For skin, I usually go with a red or a bronze, sometimes purple. Use the airbrush for this. Then, deselect and select another color to gradient, until all the colors have some degree of new color to them.

See? Now things look interesting! We added some blue to the greens, some purples to the reds, some blues to the grays and so on and so forth.

Step 6: Shading
Okay, here’s where things get interesting. Time to shade. Make a new layer between the Line Layer and Color Layer, and make sure you make it a clipping group/clipping mask. This is so it won’t go anywhere that you don’t have color. Set it to multiply or linear burn (whichever you think looks best) and bump the opacity down to about 40-50%. Choose a color (or color-value gradient, if you have drastic value changes in your piece that make light and dark values not play well with the single color you picked, and swap between those) that you want the shadows to be; I like deep pinks and purples. AVOID BLACK. I first use the Pen tool to get down “hard” shadows - shadows cast by hard materials, close shadows, and inorganic materials. Once I’ve got those down, I head on over to the softer areas, such as the skin, hair and cloth and alternate between the watercolor and marker tools to give “softer” shadows. There’s no real law to this, you just have to know where shadows fall and how they behave and  work with those three tools to get the look you want.

Step 7: “Highlights” - Rim Lighting
Okay, these aren’t really “highlights” in the correct sense, but adding sort of “rim lighting” around forms really helps make a picture pop. To do this, make another layer above the shading layer, set it to “screen” and keep the opacity at 100%. Then, get really familiar with your CRTL key because you’re going to be color sourcing a lot. To add a rim light to a form, select the base color of that form, and use the marker to trace along the edges. For example, I picked up the nude from the skin, the silver from the dagger, the gold and maroon from the hair and the tawny brown from the skull to use on those specific objects. Any place you want clean works well, but the edges of forms works best for this technique. Additionally, if you’d like, you can create another layer above the Screen Layer and set it to Linear Dogde, and do my “glowing eyes” technique on anything you want to stand out, such as the metal of the belt, gold objects and of course, eyes.

Step 8: The Overlay
Almost done! While your photo can now stand alone as “finished”, there’s one more thing that I enjoy doing, and that’s adding a simple color overlay to bring the whole picture together. This is done by flattening all the layers you have so far (you’ll want to “Merge Down” in order from bottom to top or “Flatten” to avoid the layers going crazy on each other) into one layer. Then, make a layer on top of that one, set it to a clipping mask, and set it to “overlay”. With the Airbrush, choose some colors (I prefer soft pinks, blues and violets) and go along the “edges” of your character with a BIIIIIG brush. This kind of resembles soft ambient lighting or shadows. I just think it makes the photo look nicer.

TA-DA! And Now we’re done!

And there we go! I hope that helped, and I also apologize cause this ask sat in my box for awhile and I never got around to it until now. :P
I’d be happy to answer any questions y’all have, but this is the simple basics! Remember to practice practice PRACTICE!
-Gael