vain life

She also considered very seriously what she would look like in a little cottage in the middle of the forest, dressed in a melancholy gray and holding communion only with the birds and trees; a life of retirement away from the vain world; a life into which no man came.
—  A.A. Milne
10

Favourite asian dramas’ OTPs: Wang So and Hae Soo

Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo

“The late King Taejo’s last words were that life is fleeting. It is all short and in vain. He said that life is so short. But I think that he was wrong. You and I are together like this, so how it could be in vain?” 

“If we had met in another world and another time I was thinking how great that would have been. If only that could be… I wouldn’t fear anything. I could freely… Truly, I could freely love you all I wanted.”

I Would Trust Her With My Life

There are countless moments in Rogue One that made me want to weep from joy. But chief among them is the scene where Mon Mothma tells Bail that he will need to send someone he trusts to find Obi Wan and he responds, “I would trust her with my life.”

On my first viewing, I loved that line for the mere surface level reference to Princess Leia. My heart did a little jump with glee at the clear tie in to the opening of A New Hope and that was enough to make me supremely happy.

The second time I saw Rogue One, I liked it a little bit more. Because it wasn’t just a throw away reference to Leia. It was also expertly written. It didn’t come at you like a neon sign screaming “I’M GOING TO SEND MY DAUGHTER, PRINCESS LEIA. SHE’S A LEAD IN THE OT. SHE’S ONE OF THE MOST ICONIC CHARACTERS IN CINEMA HISTORY. I’M GOING TO SEND HER ON THIS MISSION. AND SHE’S GOING TO GET CAPTURED AND THAT IS THE INCITING PLOT POINT TO THE ENTIRE STAR WARS UNIVERSE.”

It was subtle. It was clear and obvious who he was talking about, but it was a short and succinct line that was delivered with a lovely and affectionate tone that didn’t manage to distract from the mission at hand.

Now I’ve watched Rogue One for the first time in the comfort of my own home, and upon reflection I’ve realized that that line is far more important and amazing than I had already given it credit for.

Bail’s line “I would trust her with my life,” is not just a wink to the audience about the arrival of Leia. It is a deliberate and genius tie in of the major theme of Rogue One into the Original Trilogy.

For so long, Star Wars has always been Luke’s story. And it still is in many ways. But Leia (and Han) have always been sort of…secondary protagonists. They are extremely important to the plot and hold their own story lines, but their contribution to the trilogy takes a back seat to Luke’s main story. In the end, Luke helps to redeem Vader and destroy the Empire and the story comes to a conclusion through his efforts while his friends help.

But Rogue One and the inclusion of the line “I would trust her with my life,” completely reframes the idea of who was responsible for the end of the Empire.

When we meet Galen Erso in Rogue One, he is a man who has submitted to the idea that he no longer has agency over his own life and actions. In an effort to save his family and himself from the wrath of the Empire he has done terrible things and completely destroyed his name – his life as it were. Jyn is his only hope for redemption. With his dying breath, Galen trusts her implicitly to see that the Death Star is destroyed. But in addition to wanting the Death Star destroyed, his motives are also partially selfish. He also trusts that in destroying the Death Star she will vindicate his entire life and existence. He trusts that she will not let him down in redeeming his name throughout the galaxy. He trusts that she will ensure that his life is not reduced to an Imperial peon, but that his life is remembered as the life of a galactic hero.

And he’s right.

It was interesting to me that the writers chose to frame Bail’s line about Leia in such a way when we as an audience know that he will die upon his return to Alderaan when Leia is captured. But, like Galen, Bail is not trusting his daughter with his literal health and well-being. He is trusting her with his life’s work. His life’s purpose. His legacy.

Bail Organa birthed the rebellion. He sat in the room with the two remaining Jedi of the fallen order when they decided upon their final plan to one day return peace to the galaxy. He raised the very powerful daughter of a Jedi to believe in democracy, justice, and compassion so that when the day came that she learned about her power, she would not let it corrupt her.

Like Galen, Bail trusted his daughter implicitly to ensure that his legacy lived on forever. He trusted that through her continued efforts, he would not be remembered as a traitor to the Empire, but as a galactic hero and a father of democracy.  He trusted her to fight for freedom and justice and win. He trusted her to lead with compassion. He trusted her not to fall to the dark side. He trusted her never to give up on a fight that he dedicated his entire life to – even if the fight would never truly be over.

And, like Galen Erso, he was right.  

Star Wars has always been about the desire of a son to redeem the sins of his father. And that is a beautiful theme.

But now, with the addition of Rogue One and one throwaway line from Bail Organa, it is just as much about the trust of a father in his daughter. And the desire of a daughter to carry on her father’s legacy so that he will not have lived a life in vain.

And that is beautiful too.

Cancer is ruled by the moon ☾ and governs the home, family and past on an external level. Inwardly, she rules the soul powers, unconscious instinct, psychic sense, and the emotions of human nature. 

The home translates as the place known in form, and yet look closely and “home” is also the formless home; the soul & the midnight depths of oneself. Family is known as our blood kin, and yet look closer, family is who she lets into her private life, anyone she blesses with her moonlight. The past is that of childhood, but look further and the past is infinite, from ancestors to the unfathomable beginnings of time because she is the Creator.

She is the imaginative alchemist, where her dreamy nature is not in vain but solidifies into life, it is what makes her well versed in the matters of creation. This makes her Mother Midnight, ascending over beginnings and endings just as midnight ends an old day and simultaneously births a new one. She is the merger of form, esoterically where the soul meets matter (the human vessel). Cancer is spiritually linked to Neptune through a mystical umbilical cord, where the moon ☾ is pierced ♆ and creates a mass understanding of emotional pain and suffering in Cancer, fueling her empathetic love and thus her divine protection of all. 

Cancer, the World Mother, teaches us to access the soul powers and unlock sensitivity, emotion and empathy towards oneself and others. She teaches us to not live in the past, but to learn from it so that nostalgic qualms from long ago are healed through precious moments of the present. She shows us the true meaning of “family,” that relationships forced through biological reason are not stronger than bonds formed by emotional instinct. In this way, Cancer guides us all home.

From the shadow of death you can no longer save Lúthien, for by her love she is now subject to it. You can turn from your fate and lead her into exile, seeking peace in vain while your life lasts. But if you will not deny your doom, then either Lúthien, being forsaken, must assuredly die alone, or she must with you challenge the fate that lies before you–hopeless, yet not certain.

The Shepherd’s Tree - John Clare

Huge elm, with rifted trunk all notched and scarred,
Like to a warrior’s destiny! I love
To stretch me often on thy shadowed sward,
And hear the laugh of summer leaves above;
Or on thy buttressed roots to sit, and lean
In careless attitude, and there reflect
On times and deeds and darings that have been -
Old castaways, now swallowed in neglect, -
While thou art towering in thy strength of heart,
Stirring the soul to vain imaginings
In which life’s sordid being hath no part.
The wind of that eternal ditty sings,
Humming of future things, that burn the mind
To leave some fragment of itself behind.

The Truths of Life

by Venerable Yen Pei

What is life exactly? Religious teachers and philosophers of both the past and present have offered diverse explanations about life. What is the Buddhist perspective of life?

1. Life is suffering. From birth to death, isn’t all that we experience ultimately of the nature of suffering, in the final analysis? It is only with self-awareness that “life is suffering” that we can have right, penetrating understanding of life.

2. Life is impermanent. From birth to death, we undergo constant changes every instant along with the metabolic processes in the body, thus advancing steadily towards the end of death. It is only with self-awareness that “life is impermanent” that we will be constantly vigilant, treasure this precious human life and live earnestly.

3. Life is illusory. When we probe in-depth into life, we discover that life is causally arisen, without any substantiality of its own,. It is only with self-awareness that “life is illusory” that we could live fearlessly without misgivings, as we sacrifice self-interests for the benefit of others.

This human form is rare and hard to come by. One must not live this human life in vain or let it degenerate. Moreover, one must make life sublime, by following the flawless life-outlook of the Middle Path and purifying this imperfect life that is rooted in craving, so as to accomplish the perfect, enlightened life that is based upon right wisdom. Only then can one imbue this human life with great, noble value.

Idk. I think this exchange is really important. Especially with what we know from “Empire’s End.”

Han makes a point to say they lost Ben, forever. Yet Leia is adamant that they haven’t. That it was Snoke. (And now we know that it was since he was in the womb)

Leia says “But we can still save him. Me. You.”

As awful as it is, Han’s death could be the turning point in Kylo’s redemption. Don’t let Han’s death be in vain. He sacrificed his life for his son that he loves.

And the most important part, he forgave his son.

Don’t direct all your attention and thoughts on people you dislike, they don’t deserve your time. Direct your thoughts on the things that matter, the things that you can change for the better. You have around 60 000 thoughts a day, choose them wisely.
—  israfel-shadowlight
Dancing in the Moonlight (m)


Word Count: 4,607

Warning: Namjoon smut

If there were a way for you to escape responsibility, you’d gladly accept, whatever the consequences might be.

“Now smile and hold your head up high,” the voice behind you says drowning with sternness and expectations.

“Yes, mother.”

Keep reading