used a different action on this one

Beautifully Written...

Lionel Messi might not be medicine, but he can feel like it. Watching Messi with a ball at his feet is a testament to the rest of our possibilities. Maybe we aren’t so terrible, because he’s one of us. He can make us seem better than we are.

He rewards so many different kinds of attention. Sometimes he is best seen from a distance. If you’re far enough away from the action so that the names and numbers have disappeared, Messi will still be easy to spot. That’s him, way over there, the man farthest removed from the play. That’s him standing by himself.

Early in the game, he will also be the man who looks the most mentally distant, as though a spectator has invaded the pitch and nobody has bothered to chase him. He will be the one looking as though he’s waiting for a bus, maybe with his hands on his hips, or with his hands running through his hair, or with his hands rubbing his eyes. He will be the only player doing more with his hands than his feet.

In Barcelona’s last La Liga game, at home against Eibar on May 21, there was a moment when Messi amazed by just how little he seemed to be doing. It was an important match – a win coupled with a Real Madrid loss in Malaga would have given Barcelona the title – and Eibar had taken an unexpected lead in the seventh minute. The cauldron that is the Camp Nou steamed with urgency, and when Eibar lined up to take a corner kick, there was a palpable sense of concern.

Not from Messi. He was standing inside the center circle, watching the play but not really.

Then he took a step and became distracted by something under his feet. The ground wasn’t quite right. While Eibar took their corner, unsuccessfully it turned out, Messi was crouched down, his back to the play, doing a bit of work on the pitch. In that moment, at least, he didn’t seem interested in healing anything but the grass. He was concerned with only the smallest of fixes.

MAYBE HE KNEW THAT Cristiano Ronaldo already had put Real Madrid ahead in Malaga, and the fight was over. La Liga would not be his for the third time in nine seasons. Or maybe Messi was saving his resources for those moments when he knew he would make more of a difference. Or maybe he was watching Eibar and looking for weakness. Maybe he was Messi, lying in wait.

Opportunities more worthy of his attention eventually came, but he failed to convert them. He missed from the top of the six-yard box, and Luis Suarez stared at him, open mouthed, the way a nonbeliever would contemplate a ghost.

Later, trailing 2-1, Messi saw his penalty shot stopped. He tore into the front of his jersey with his teeth. That seemed to cleanse him, and he decided to play more like Messi, as though the choice had always been his. Now he was easy to spot for better reasons.

Again and again he demonstrated the subtlest of his talents and so the most beautiful of them: perfectly weighted volleys and a nutmeg so grievous that it felt as though the victim had to be in on it. Barcelona tied the score, and then Messi converted his second chance from the penalty spot to give his side the lead, 3-2.

Then he went on a run.

With seconds remaining in the game, he picked up the ball inside the center circle, not far from the spot where he had made his earlier repair to the turf. Maybe he had known all along how important that patch of grass would be.

He broke through two Eibar players immediately, and then he ran straight down the middle of the pitch, as though on a tightrope, making the slightest of feints to get past Alex Galvez, who almost blew a hamstring lunging for the empty space where he thought Messi would be. Messi dodged two more defenders, leaned inside, and slipped the ball across his body with his right foot, easing it into the bottom corner of the net, 4-2.

In some ways it was just another goal for Messi, the 506th of his club career, made meaningless by Ronaldo’s larger scheme which, this season, also happened to be the winning one. But for those of us lucky enough to see Messi’s goal in the flesh, it would remain significant beyond reason.

Even while Real celebrated their title in Malaga, Messi remained defiant, determined to write his own ending. That run was a message to his rivals in Madrid. It was also a message to sickness, to despair: This is what I can do. Who cares about you?

ON SATURDAY, MESSI will turn 30. He made his professional debut in October 2004, when he was 17 years, 3 months and 22 days old, the second-youngest player to dress for Barcelona’s senior side. Somehow, that was almost 13 years ago. There are teenagers who know life only with Messi in it.

The math is easy, except that it isn’t. Messi will not be playing football when he is 43. His career is more than half over. It is probably three-quarters gone. Whatever the number of games that remain for him to play, and so for us to watch, it will be far less than he, and we, have already enjoyed.

It is almost painful to see film of him from the start of things. He played differently then. He was unblinking, like a child. His skin was clear of tattoos. His hair was boyishly long, parted in the middle. Now we know the greatness that awaited him, but back then, when he came sprinting off the bench for the last eight minutes against Espanyol, the first eight minutes of his career, he was all future.

Today’s Messi is mostly past. Each time we see him, we get a little bit closer to what will be our last chance.

THERE ARE OTHER REASONS for urgency. Barcelona seem on the verge of a downswing, or at least their version of one. Real Madrid, the champions of Spain and of Europe, look ascendant, barring Ronaldo’s possible tax exile and despite Messi’s memorable last-minute strike in April’s El Clasico. (Has there ever been a better celebration than his lifting his jersey to the Bernabeu crowd?) There also have been fissures of discontent among Barcelona’s collection of stars, with reports surfacing in the Spanish press, first at Diario Gol, that Neymar’s father wants him to leave to escape Messi’s shadow. Ernesto Valverde, the club’s new manager, has yet to oversee a game, and Messi’s own contract extension talks have been protracted, still incomplete.

The Spanish radio station Cadena Ser reported earlier this month that the terms of Messi’s extension – three more years, with a possible fourth, and a £348 million buyout clause – have been settled. But the contract has not been officially announced or signed.

Messi had rejected Barcelona’s opening offer, worth about £29 million a season, and there were worried rumors that he might end up leaving the club for somewhere like Manchester City. That seems unlikely. City CEO Ferran Soriano recently said that he expected Messi would retire at the only club he has known. Messi and Barcelona, the city and the side, have become almost impossibly intertwined. Earlier this month he bought a hotel down the coast; his fiancee and Suarez’s wife partnered on an upscale shoe store in town in the spring. In May, club president Josep Maria Bartomeu said: “There are no doubts. The marriage between Messi and Barcelona will continue.”

Marriage, with all its love and resentments, with its daytime certainty and slivers of late-night doubt, is the right word.

The prospects are far dimmer for his international career, despite his successful appeal of his four-game suspension for swearing at a linesman. Argentina are in a state of disarray on and off the pitch. Messi famously retired following yet another second-place finish in last year’s Copa America, only to change his mind. His side currently sit fifth in CONMEBOL qualifying, a point outside a guaranteed place in next year’s World Cup. It will be a shock if Argentina don’t make it to Russia, but it’s shock enough that it’s even a possibility.

Messi’s career is evidence of the fineness of lines even for the best of us. It’s all such a delicate balance. Were it not for a course of growth hormone when he was a child, we might never have caught a single glimpse of the tiny, talented boy from Argentina.

If it weren’t for a long, low shot that he delivered just wide against Germany, he might have won the 2014 World Cup.

If it weren’t for his missed penalty, he might have won last year’s Copa America, too.


MESSI’S MOST MASTERFUL ILLUSION is his appearance to be in total control of his fate, his legend long secure. An entire theme park devoted to him and his exploits is scheduled to open in Nanjing, China, in 2019, which says something about both his global appeal and the fantasies he inspires. The museum at the Camp Nou already has a section reserved for him, Ballon D'Or after Ballon D'Or in glass cases made cloudy by the fingerprints of the faithful.

They visit the museum in their legions from around the world, more than 1.6 million annually. There is a feeling, walking with the crowds of foreign visitors to the stadium, holding aloft scarfs still creased, that he has become one of the city’s principal tourist attractions: Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia, the Gothic Quarter, and Lionel Messi. He can be confused for a monument.

But a man is nothing so permanent. Messi knows this.

In a rare interview with ESPN’s Jeremy Schaap in 2014, Messi was asked why he seems to pay so little mind to how history will view him.

“Because the only thing that matters is playing,” he said. “I have enjoyed it since I was a little boy, and I still try to do that every time I go out on to a pitch. I always say that when I no longer enjoy it, or it’s no longer fun to play, then I won’t do it anymore. I do it because I love it, and that’s all I care about.”

More and more, he has been given reason not to love it. If he does sign a three- or four-year contract, that will probably be his last. The joy will be wrung out of him by the end of it. Our expectations of him are so high, the greatest player in the world is somehow also becoming the most underappreciated one. He scored 54 goals in 52 games for Barcelona this season, and it’s still a disappointment. He finished second in the World Cup and second in the Copa America, twice, and he has let his country down.

His gifts are so great, his miracles so routine, that they can exceed our capacity to appreciate them. He lifts us, but he also exposes the limits of our attention, the ceiling for our mindfulness. He has given us so much to remember, we’re already starting to forget.

ON MAY 27, MESSI played the final game of his third decade, the Copa del Rey final against Alaves in Madrid. There was a strange, almost sinister atmosphere at the doomed Calderon from the start.

Ronaldo and the rest of Real were preparing to play Juventus in the Champions League final, and it was clear that the Spanish capital’s attention was elsewhere. There was also an unhappy sense that Barcelona’s season was a failure regardless of the result.

The underdog’s end was full to bursting, but there were hundreds and perhaps thousands of empty seats in Barcelona’s half of the stadium. Club flags had been placed on every chair in advance, and many of them would stay there, draped over the backs of vacant seats.

Even Messi looked out of sorts, rubbing the back of his neck as though he had a headache that he couldn’t shake. He walked to his position, his eyes down. He took in nothing but his feet.

Then the whistle blew.

In the third minute, he touched the ball for the first time, stopping a hard pass with his chest. The ball dropped obediently to his feet. He turned and lifted a long, pinpoint pass deep into Alaves territory.

It was, by his standards, a totally unremarkable play.

It was also, by the standards of the rest of us, six seconds of grace.

Messi can seem obscenely blessed. He might run less than anybody else on the pitch, but it is uncanny how often he is in the right place. There were countless times against Alaves when he looked to be out of position and the ball still ended up trapped in his orbit, as though he generates his own gravity. Watching him closely – not from distance this time, but under a microscope – it’s possible to anticipate when he will receive the ball, because he still lights up like a boy when he senses its arrival, an almost imperceptible surge of energy coursing through him, a current that pushes him to the balls of his feet.

He can do what every great athlete can do and the rest of us can’t: He can see the future. He knows what will happen before anyone else in the stadium understands what just did.

Messi opened the scoring that night, launching a low curling shot from outside the box, and he began running in celebration before it had even found the net, 507 and counting.

Later, he fed Neymar for a second Barcelona marker, and then, in stoppage time, just as he had against Eibar, he went on another run. This time he received the ball near the sideline, near his bench. He broke out through two defenders and cut across the top of the box. He looked as though he might shoot, crafting a near-perfect replica of his wonder goal against Bilbao in 2015.

Remember that one? Could Ronaldo have done that? The debate over their respective greatness will rage, because it’s unsolvable. It’s like arguing whether you prefer gold’s flash to silver’s charm. It’s up to you. Ronaldo’s fans will point at his athleticism, his scoring touch, his nose for goal and his Euro 2016 trophy. Messi’s will cite something less explosive but perhaps more complex, such as that run in the Copa del Rey final against Alaves. It didn’t end with a shot after all, but with a sublime pass to Paco Alcacer, who easily slotted the ball home to make the final score 3-1.

Messi didn’t just pass that ball. That’s like saying Einstein did some math. It took several looks at a replay to determine what exactly Messi did do. He employed his limitless imagination and a delicate heel to slip the ball through three converging Alaves defenders who nearly lost their boots.

He had pulled one of his impossible tricks almost in spite of all those empty seats, a little dig to remind the distracted what they will one day so deeply miss.

The thrill of magic comes when your heart wants to believe in something that you know can’t be real. The thrill of Messi is different. He makes your heart question the reality of something that you know you just saw.

A FEW MINUTES AND FOREVER later, Messi stood on a podium that had been set up in the middle of the field, celebrating his win with his teammates. Fireworks went off when he held up another trophy. Soon it will join the rows of them behind glass in the Camp Nou museum, one more spoil of an endless war.

He found his fiancee and his children and brought them onto the pitch, where he played with his kids on the grass. Then he returned his family to the spectator side of the ropes, and he walked, the way he always walks, back to the podium, now empty. He sat down and pulled his legs close to himself.

The stadium lights started going out. These were some of his last public moments as a young man, the start of his inevitable slipping away. He enjoyed them not alone, but he was almost alone, and not invisible, but he was almost invisible.

He pulled down his socks and removed his shin pads, shining with sweat. He rested, and he savored, and he soaked. More lights went out, and finally he lifted himself back to his tired feet. He walked just a little more, this time toward the sideline. The few remaining fans reached out to him from the stands in worship.

He smiled and waved to them, took a few steps down toward the tunnel, and disappeared.



-Chris Jones is a writer for ESPN FC

Touch! Chapter 1

A Klance Fencing au

A/N: I’ve finally started it! My first real fic, not just a ficlet or a one-shot! It’s about Lance and Keith meeting at a fencing match, and Lance being oblivious to Keith’s pining. I really hope you enjoy. It’s from Lance’s point of view.

Chapter one: Salute, Salut!

A salute is a blade action performed by both fencers before a bout that indicates respect and good sportsmanship.

Keep reading

queensolace  asked:

I'm very hurt by something my mom said when I finally tried to come out to her about what I went through when her ex husband was around, so now I need you to rant about it please. The words were "at least he didn't beat you". (Which completely invalidates everything he DID do to me, physically and mentally, as well as how it affects how I function to this day) Please answer this ask.

My mother has used that excuse in the past, but in her case it was so she wouldn’t feel guilty about it, which may be different to why your mom said it. And you’re right, it does invalidate everything he did to you. ‘At least he didn’t beat you’ is not an excuse for everything he did. She shouldn’t be giving him excuses for his actions anyway. It’s shitty and doesn’t help you at all. There is more than one form of abuse, and the damage that the emotional, mental and physical abuse caused can be just as bad and long-lasting as beatings. Also, every person reacts to abuse differently. For example, my brother was beaten regularly as a child/teenager, but he has managed to become a well-adjusted, stable and happy person. But I haven’t. I wasn’t beaten, but I was emotionally and mentally abused growing up (and sexually, but I’m still struggling to accept that), and I struggle a lot to function on a daily basis.

Since it has been a while since you asked this, has anything happened since? Have you spoken to her about it? 

anonymous asked:

Could you list all of the tropes that you consider "feel good violence"?

Okay, “Feel Good Violence” is very simple as a concept. It’s violence that feels good, when you’re reading it, when you’re watching it on screen, because for the perpetrator violence can feel really damn good. However, that is violence when taken outside of context. It is violence without consequences. It is violence for the sake of violence. Violence that serves no purpose but to prove the character or person is tough.

Protagonist Sanctioned Bullying - Bullying in general is a fairly popular method to achieve “Feel Good Violence” because bullying does feel good. The audience sympathizes with the protagonist, so when the protagonist acts they cheer for it. Its not presented as bullying by the narrative, but it is still bullying. Usually it’s a rival or a character set up to “deserve it”, but sometimes not.

Making people afraid makes you feel tough. Many authors will fall prey to the sweet lure of bullying and not even know it because bullying is violence without fear of consequence. Most often, they’ve been the recipients rather than the perpetrators, and acting as the bully is a very different ballgame. It is an emotional and psychological high. You feel big, strong, safe, and untouchable. Powerful. In their worst incarnations, most superheroes become bullies.

Bullying is all about control, protected status, and freedom from consequences. An entirely fictional world creates the opportunity for all these things, with the narrative itself siding with the bully. Bullying is Feel Good Violence writ large in real life. It’ll follow you into the fictional world just as easily. Power is a high you never forget.

This is very common trope for characters who also act as a means of self-insertion by the author. For them, it isn’t bullying. It’s an example of how awesome their character is and how tough they are.

Everything But Dead - When the only morals applied are if someone died, the rest is sanctioned without comment. There are no narrative consequences for the character’s behavior, and everyone cheers them on. Anyone who calls them out is an acceptable target, usually evil, or the protagonist wins them over in the end because their actions are “justified”.

By Any Means Stupid - This is the “by any means necessary“ trope, where the violence really isn’t necessary and the author just wanted an excuse to paint the room red.

Unprovoked Violence Is Always the Solution - This is the one where the protagonist skips all the other steps and goes straight to preemptive violence against a total stranger, for no reason other than it makes them appear tough. Usually not framed by the narrative as bad, but it is. Oh, yes, it is. Worse there usually aren’t any consequences for the hero physically assaulting someone in a room full of witnesses because everyone knows they’re the hero, right?

Random Violence Before Strangers is A-Okay -  The protagonist disembowels a bully in front of their victim in order to protect them and receives effusive thank yous. Nothing comes from this. The bad guy is dead. We all feel good. All is right in the world. Except… violence freaks people out.

Acceptable Targets - These are people designated by the writer as non-entities and targets for violence regardless of narrative context. A very slippery slope that is ever descending. But, you know, it feels good? Sure, so long as you’re not on the receiving end. This kind of dehumanization happens in real life too, just in case you were wondering.

Beating Up My Source - You have a character who collects information from an old standby, they threaten and beat up that standby regularly to show they’re tough. At what point does this seem like a terrible idea? Never! Hey, they’re a bad person so you feel good, right?

Waving My Gun Around - Trigger discipline is just the beginning of this problem. A gun is not a toy. but you’ll find a vast array of narratives who use it that way in order to look tough.

Killing Your Way to the Top - You can’t really destroy organizations like this. Killing the people at the top will just lead to someone else taking their place. Whenever you create a power vacuum someone will fill it. You can’t destroy an organization by killing. It doesn’t work. But, it feels good!

Must Obviously Be Boy - Because female fighters are unicorns and the mooks have never laid eyes on a woman before. Usually part of a larger narrative issue with violence, but acts as a “get out of jail free” card.

Clear the Building - That time the character decided to knock everyone out to prove that they are tough. Weirder when it happens on stealth missions.

I Am Not Gaining Levels - When you’re reading a book and the character is fighting like it’s a video game. They fight everyone like they’re in an RPG chasing XP. Why? We don’t know, but it makes them feel good.

Let Me Shoot Him Twenty Times - We could call this spray and pray, but let’s pretend for a moment the magazine could run dry.

Magic Bullets - The bullets that go where you want, stop when you want, and don’t cause accidental casualties. You know, like the protagonist blind firing through a wall and hitting a four year old playing in the yard across the street.

Body Armor Always Prevents A Blow-through - Nope!

New to Training, Perfect Sparring - That time the main character took on their evil rival (school’s top/better trained student) in a sparring match and won, especially when it was their first day.

Sparring Just In General - The vast majority of Western media doesn’t understand the concept or purpose of sparring. Many authors seem to think its a UFC match where you just beat each other up and the first thing you do during training to “assess your capabilities”.

Queuing for Combat - This is an old Hollywood trick where the burden of a group fight is lifted as the stuntmen wait their turn to fight the protagonist. Particularly egregious in written action sequences where the author doesn’t grasp the concept of teamwork. It also warps the understanding of how many people its possible for a human to fight at once.

Terrible At Torture - Torture is a terrible way to gain information in general because it doesn’t lead to a confession so much as confirmation bias. The subject will tell you whatever you want to hear because they want the pain to stop. It’s even worse when done poorly, which it is 90% of the time. Usually, media uses it for shock value or to prove how tough a protagonist is. Torture is not putting a blowtorch to someone’s foot and hoping for the best. It’s far, far more complicated than that. Neither torturer nor subject come out of the experience whole. Besides, the unimaginative protagonists say, “screw you!” The clever ones lie.

What Is: Dress for Success - How we dress our characters is often necessary for crafting a sense of narrative realism. This comes in often as a reason for why its so difficult to take female action heroes seriously, but it happens to the guys too. Not a bad trope on its own, but often symptomatic of a larger narrative approach to violence that ends with “feel” and “good”.

Beautiful and Badass - This one is a very specific female fantasy, which is that you can meet all the cultural standards and definitions for beauty while being in direct defiance of them. These are the female characters who are never touched by the combat they engage in. They are always graceful, always elegant, always beautiful in motion and the narrative will pause to tell us this often. “She fights like she’s dancing.” For these characters, their supermodel-esque beauty is a natural extension of their being. They don’t work at it. Combat is incidental. It’s a set piece to tell you how awesome the character is. It generally amounts to nothing, serves no real narrative purpose, but by god the author is going to walk us through it in excruciating detail. Combat and character are separate, and consequences are for other people.

My Instincts Performed A Wheel Kick - Your instincts just don’t work that way.

There’s probably more, but that hits most of the major sins.

Keep in mind that many of these tropes are not issues by themselves. They often work when context and consequences are taken into account by their narrative/setting. Generally, this results in characters with no accountability for their behavior and exhibit no responsibility for their actions. The issue, of course, is that responsibility and accountability are what make well-written violence work. Violence often drives the narrative. It’s part and parcel to who the character is, and their decision making. It’s the difference between a character who presents themselves as tough or skilled and one who actually is.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

Concerning Shinsou Hitoshi’s Quirk

Was saving this (still using this) theory for a fanfiction, but it serves as a good canon theory fodder too – and I’ve already lagged behind in updates and it’s not fair to hold the theory off too long. I am of the belief that there is more to Shinsou Hitoshi’s quirk - or, that it has been misdiagnosed. So, let’s go through this logically!


What We Know

Shinsou has a tired demeanor, which may or may not be related to his quirk. Hooded eyelids, eye-bags, mild slouch, some sluggishness … this could simply be a character design, but considering he’s one of the few with eye-bags, it’s more likely to be quirk-related.

He needs a verbal response to his own provocations for his quirk to function.

He can do it for a relatively extended period of time. At least for ten minutes at a time - enough to last the Calvary battle, and to multiple individuals - as seen in both the race and the Calvary battle:

He can manipulate one’s actions but not one’s words, and their actions are sluggish and fairly simple. He also seems to have to keep his commands simple and short. It’s something relatively noticeable whenever he implements his quirk, this his commands are never extremely difficult to follow:

A punch or some external force can actively knock someone out of his quirks’ control. And, some people do remember what is going on while under the control, whereas others do not. For example, Ojirou did not remember until he was disturbed:

But it becomes clear that Izuku does remember what happened before an external force was used on him. Otherwise he would have no memory of the vision of previous OfA users. This could be the influence of OfA as a quirk itself, but it does not have to be.


What It Boils Down To

  1. Shinsou has a tired demeanor, which may or may not be related to his quirk.
  2. He needs a verbal response to his own provocations for his quirk to function.
  3. He can manipulate one’s actions but not one’s words, and their actions are sluggish and fairly simple.
  4. He can do it for a relatively extended period of time and for more than one command, but he has to keep his commands simple and short.
  5. A punch or some external force can actively knock someone out of his quirks’ control.
  6. Some people do remember what is going on while under the control.


What Makes Sense

That which is above does not add up to brainwashing. Brainwashing is, by definition:

“[to] make (someone) adopt radically different beliefs by using systematic and often forcible pressure”

Brainwashing would imply that the commands would have greater permanence or be effective beyond the immediate control. It comes with greater complexities, and longer-lasting effects.

Common steps in brainwashing, as noted by psychologist Robert Jay Lifton, include:

  • assault on identity
  • guilt
  • self-betrayal
  • breaking point
  • leniency
  • compulsion to confess
  • channeling of guilt
  • releasing of guilt
  • progress and harmony
  • final confession and rebirth

But Hitoshi has implemented none of these steps against any individuals: brainwashing is a more conscious ordeal than an unconscious one.

Logically, it means that his quirk is not brainwashing. Instead, it is closer to sleepwalking because of its unconscious and impermanent nature.

Or, at least, the ability to cause others to sleepwalk. So, let’s talk sleepwalking, which is by definition:

“walk around and sometimes perform other actions while asleep”

Hitoshi victims perform simple tasks while under his control, lacking verbal response and permanence in the thereafter of his control. The above shows Izuku walking because of a particular command, but the logic behind this is not not just because that the command was to turn around and walk out-of-bounds. It’s that everything Hitoshi does in utilizing his quirk matches the symptoms of sleepwalking, which include:

  • get out of bed and walk around

Hitoshi’s victims can walk around, though it is a slow crawl / mechanical set of movements.

  • have a glazed, glassy-eyed expression

Izuku is not the only character to have had the glossy-eyed look when under Shinsou Hitoshi’s control.

  • not respond or communicate with others
  • be difficult to wake up during an episode
  • be disoriented or confused for a short time after being awakened
  • not remembering the episode in the morning

The four points above explain the effects that all of his victims have had in some form or another. None of his victims have been able to communicate or easily wake themselves from an episode, and anyone who has sleepwalked usually needs a punch or hit of some kind to snap out of it. Sleepwalking (and its sibling, sleeptalking) is simple-task-based, and sleeptalking is rarely more than five words strung together. Hitoshi likely cannot give complex (or too many) commands to someone, and his victims likely cannot perform complex tasks. In essence, he is using sleeptalking to control someone’s sleepwalking, the “sleeptalking” being his quirks’ way of getting in control over someone’s actions.

Hitoshi loses all control and influence when the dreaming / sleepwalking ends; if it was brainwashing, Izuku would have continued to walk out-of-bounds even after regaining control.

Extremely few are able to remember what happens during sleepwalking, but active dreamers are more likely to remember sleepwalking. Considering Izuku’s imagination and innovative skills, I would not be surprised if he is an active-dreamer, in which he has some control over his dreams and sleepwalking decisions. This explains why he remembers it from the moment he went under, and remembers it even after coming out (the vision) while Ojirou could only remember what came after being bumped by another team (and not during). Also note the use of colors during the animated sequence, which tend to match the way our brains work during dreams and in storing memories: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVSjXooP7D4

  • have problems functioning during the day because of disturbed sleep
  • have sleep terrors in addition to sleepwalking

These two points above are likely the blow-back Hitoshi faces for using his quirk: his tired demeanor, the eye-bags, and abrasive attitude are all good indications of poor sleeping habits. Sleepwalking also occurs during the REM sleep stages, which is the level of sleep needed to feel well-rested (and Hitoshi does not look well-rested): this may also explain his absurd time limits in controlling people, for at least ten minutes and on multiple individuals, because REM sleep cycles last for 90 - 100 minutes at a time. This could be the maximum he can do on any one individual at a time, or at least the maximum time he can divide up among those he does have under his control.


The Plot-Contributing Point of it Being Sleepwalking?

By and large psychological. If you believed your quirk was brainwashing for most of your life, you likely would not have tested it to any extent. Certainly not to an extent where you figure out the confines of your quirks’ abilities are closer to something else. It would provide immense relief for Shinsou Hitoshi to learn that his quirk isn’t as mind-altering as originally interpreted to be, and likely serve as an opening for him to become a better hero.


Further Evidence

Can I just add in the soundtrack from the anime for a passing moment? When I first heard this, my instinct wasn’t that it was brainwashing. The use of lullabies and scattered voices, creepy as they are, alludes to sleep-related themes.

Would love to hear more thoughts on this!

Domestic Garden Witch: Shrines in the Garden

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

A Practice As Old As Time

In previous Domestic Garden Witch articles, I’ve covered setting up altars and arranging gardens so as to be living altars. As witches, we are often looking for ways in which we can reconnect with nature and find harmony with its ebb and flow. For as long as mankind has been around trees, it seems as though these impressive and beautiful plants have inspired and drawn us closer to the divine.

Nearly every culture has something to say when it comes to trees - their growth patterns, their spiritual significance, and even the varying properties of their constituent parts. Roots, leaves, branches, seeds or fruit, and wood… all have a part to play in many religions. This is particularly true for modern druidic practice, which draws from Celtic lore and centers around the magic in certain woods. And as can be seen from my current Runic Friday series on the Ogham, certain woods were prominent enough in Celtic lore to inspire a form of divination symbolized by Irish Celtic writing.

There are many ways in which we can bring the magic of trees into our lives, but when it comes to garden magic, I have yet to see a method so endearing as building shrines on or near them.

Simple or Complex, Religious or Spiritual

Shrines are most often associated with religion - especially religions such as Hindu, Shinto, and Buddhism. In short, a shrine is a type of altar which is usually dedicated to a specific god, spirit, or ancestor as opposed to being devoted to whole pantheons. Depending on the practice, these shrines can be ornate or very simple.

But shrines aren’t limited to religion or ancestor worship. Like altars, they can be places of meditation or magical working, and therefore can have a place in spirituality regardless of the faith practiced.

Tree shrines are a great way of integrating your practice with your garden, providing a place to meditate or work magic, or to honor deities. As an added benefit, they can be used to honor the spirit within the tree if desired. For those on a budget, the shrine need not be overly fancy - a small altar made of stone or wood at the base of the tree is sufficient. But if fancier shrines are more your style, inspiration can be drawn from real world shrines, which are often built into the hollows of trees or carved into them. Here, offerings can be made or deities worshipped as you see fit.

Consider the role the tree plays in your garden, and build your shrine with that in mind. Is your oak tree a silent protector? Or perhaps you feel that your maple tree brings luck and money to your home? If this is a tree in your orchard, the shrine may be a way by which you can ask for healthy and bountiful harvests!

A few examples:

-Oak: Oak trees are common, and are often symbolic of protection, knowledge, wisdom, and strength. Building a shrine decorated with acorns and fallen oak branches may be a way of encouraging the oak to protect your home, or inspire the drive to learn in your heart. Or even, perhaps, it can be a way of honoring the Oak King if you follow the Wiccan Wheel of the Year!

-Maple: Often associated with the moon, maple trees are linked to both magic and healing. Shrines dedicated to bringing about good health and happiness are ideal with maple trees, allowing them to extend their healing energies to you!

-Pine: Pine trees, a mainstay in the northern hemisphere, are trees of strength and raw power. They are ancient and invoke a sense of mystery. Shrines built at the base of a pine tree can be dedicated to finding that primal strength that lives within all of us, and for helping us connect with the past. These are excellent trees for ancestor shrines, depending upon your practice.

-Apple: Speaking of ancestor worship, apple is associated with otherworld. Its link to the dead is on a mythical scope, lending its energies quite well to ancestor shrines. However, it is also a tree of fertility and choice. As such, shrines meant to encourage fertility in the garden or one’s own fertility are great when built at the base of an apple tree. Furthermore, it helps encourage decisive action, inspiring quick decision making and wise undertakings.

In Conclusion…

While this week’s article is quite different from most, it calls us back to a time when the gardens we tended were the ones planted by nature itself. Whether your shrine is dedicated to the tree or some other spirit, or if it is built to honor an altogether different plant, it is a useful tool for the garden witch who thrives when working magic outdoors.

Consider how your garden can benefit from the added spiritual energy of shrines. Perhaps the trees have more to offer than we may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

me: complains about supergirl

someone, inevitably: watch wynonna earp or the bold type! those are WAY bette-

me: i watch both, and i like both. but i am allowed to complain about supergirl and the shit they pull. when i say i want a better show, i don’t mean a different one. i want supergirl to get their fucking act together. i want sanvers to stop being sidelined. i want james to be more of a central character. i want mon el to be held accountable for his actions. i want, at the very least, for supercorp not to be a running gag for the cast. i’m glad you’re able to move on and watch something else, but i’d like to complain about a show i used to love and wish for it to be better without recommendations being shoved down my throat. AND i’d like it if you could stop comparing how your wlw are better. i didn’t ask.

Some tips about dynamism:

-Your sketches will always be dirty as fuck at the beginning. It’s normal and it’s okay. What you’re looking for is the right movement, intensity and direction, not drawing the next Mona Lisa.

-Try a lot of different posings, the first one will rarely be the right one. Some posings will feel better than others. You can then focus on the ones you like best and push/exaggerate them.

-Use!!! references!!! Analyze the action you want to draw! Look at what moves and when it moves (the hand moves faster than the elbow maybe? the hip rotate to follow the bust maybe? analyyyyze!)

anonymous asked:

I don't know if you watch GOT, but how hard would it be to fight someone like the mountain hand-to-hand? (well, armed, like in the show). Does being big like him really makes for a better fighter?

Hand to hand is a bit different from armed, especially armored, but okay. The answer is pretty simple.

Start low.

Tall fighters, especially male fighters, have a rather serious issue that’s often overlooked: their center of gravity. It’s higher up off the ground than the average person, and a great many men (like the Mountain) do not drop low enough into their stances to compensate. The taller they are, the lower they need to go to counterbalance their size. Attack their feet, or their legs. Attack their center. Whatever you need to destabilize them. A lot of tall fighters have issues with their base. There are other flaws, but that’s often a big one.

Cutting the legs out from under of your enemy is a real tactic, or I should say: cutting them down to size.

Stab him in the foot. (Yeah, no, real combat tactic.)

Here’s a question: you ever hear the story about David versus Goliath? Probably, most people know the story of the shepherd boy who defeated the greatest, largest warrior in single combat with a sling.

The story is a parable, and a life lesson. It’s also a little more complicated than just brains over brawn. If you take anything from the story, the big one is going to be: never fight your enemy on their terms. Understand where their strengths are, where you’re strengths are, and change the rules.

What a big fighter has going for them is the intimidation factor, and mind games in combat are a huge deal. It’s not so much about physical prowess as much as what your enemy believes about your physical prowess. Or you believe about your opponent’s. What you believe will affect how you fight, how hard you fight, and how well you fight. Go into a fight believing you’re at a disadvantage or will lose and you’ll lose.

Assessing your enemy’s strengths for their weaknesses is the winning strategy. If never addressed, big fighters will have a lot of flaws because their opponents often cede them the field in their minds. This is especially true when in training, and training is the foundation of skill. When people treat you like you’re invincible, you’ll start to believe you are. And that’s how you get an over reliance on a natural advantage with no compensation for the flaws it brings.

The problem is that many people treat size and body types like they’re all or nothing. For every advantage one has, there’s a disadvantage to go with it. A fighter with a heavy reliance on what nature has given them (size, strength, what have you) often neglects more crucial skills if never addressed. You can have big fighters with exceptional levels of skill, but those are the ones who’ve realized they can’t brute force their way through every problem. When they don’t, their technique is sloppy.

Now, really, really, really big people often have to work doubly hard to develop their coordination because fighting with a big, lanky body is difficult.

The trick when you have (or feel like you have) the disadvantage is not to meet the enemy on their terms. The best fighters figure out how to exploit their opponent’s strengths in order to expose their weaknesses and fight with an advantage. The bad fighters are the ones who choose to fight at a disadvantage, who don’t prepare to face their enemy, and try to use the same tactics over and over. The smart ones change up, they are proactive, and understand the battlefield flows.

Ultimately, that’s what makes for the “best” fighter.

Fear is the biggest strength for someone who is massive in size, not their strength and not their bulk. When you are frightened, you become reactive, you cease to actively think, and fail to problem solve. The moment you are defeated in your mind, that is the moment you lose. It doesn’t matter how many steps it takes in the real world after the fact, cede the field in your mind and it’s over. Intimidation can win that fight before the battle ever begins, and the biggest kid on the playground is as natural as intimidation gets.

The Mountain isn’t great because of his skill, but the fact that he makes everyone around him afraid. His personal ruthlessness and cruelty back up that size, and strengthens his ability to intimidate. When facing the Mountain, you’re faced with fear over the (very real) consequences of what he’ll do to you.

He’s valuable because he’s frightening, not because he’s good at fighting. The good at fighting is the bonus that makes him more frightening.

Understanding the affect the mind has on combat is like 70% to victory. Understanding the assumptions made and why we make them is important to writing scenes with characters like this. If you put stock in the Mountain’s size, rather than the Mountain’s reputation then you miss where his strengths actually lie and why people are afraid of him.

The Mountain’s reputation is as a ruthless killing machine who delights in rape, murder, and pillage. Torture is his specialty. He does not abide by the code of chivalry or rules of knightly honor. He’s a sadist. For him, there’s no such thing as just warfare. He thirsts for blood and battle. He’s protected by one of the most powerful houses in the GOT universe, and he earns his pay as their enforcer.

His size is just a plus. He could be just as terrifying at 5″4, and then you’d have the joy of underestimating him before he put a knife through your eye. If he was small, he’d be even more terrifying because there’d be more bodies. His size doesn’t change who he is under the hood, it’s just one more attribute he’s utilizing to its fullest potential.

Stereotypes about tall and short people are just that. Stereotypes.

Every body type has its drawbacks, and their natural advantages can be made to work against them. Tall fighters are more gangly, their center of gravity is further away from the earth, their weight puts additional stress on their joints (especially their knees), and if they never work at addressing their issues they can be slower to start. You can also have overweight/heavy weight martial artists like Sammo Hung, where there’s virtually no difference between them and a martial artist half their size. Skill can close the gap. Understanding of your own strengths and weaknesses also helps. Knowledge is power. Training yourself out of society’s instilled biases is hard, but necessary. This is especially true if you perceive yourself to be the underdog.

Not automatically assuming bigger equals better is the first step. The second is realizing that the best warriors are not decided by outside metrics, but rather through an inward understanding of how to utilize their strengths and address their weaknesses.

On that note, I’ll leave you with a compilation of Cynthia Rothrock’s fight scenes. Cythnia Rothrock is a Hong Kong action star, a winner of world championships in the 80s, she has a wide variety of black belt level training in multiple martial arts, and is one of the most famous westerners to make it in the Hong Kong action scene.

Why end with this? Well, exposure to female movie martial artists runs the gamut between low to non-existent and that lack of exposure to different body types is where most misunderstandings about size come from.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

Hey guys! Here’s some advice for writing that rhetorical analysis essay on the ap lang/comp exam in a few weeks:

intro paragraph: 

This should only be 3-4 sentences long. Don’t spend too much time on it! Make sure you cover the SOAPS. 

This is how I like to do it:

  • speaker, occasion, subject (1 sentence)
  • purpose (1 sentence)
  • audience (1 sentence)
  • thesis (1 sentence)

Your thesis should tell what you’re proving about the effects of the author’s techniques– it shouldn’t straight up list the techniques you’re discussing! Also, your thesis will ideally be a complex-compound sentence, which means it will have at least one dependent clause and two independent clauses. That makes your writing more sophisticated! 

Here’s an example thesis (that I wrote for an analysis of a single paragraph):

“As Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail’ addresses the criticism of his actions and defends his methods, his twenty-third paragraph declares his complaints against the intransigence of the white moderate, defining the white moderate’s innate complacency as the single greatest obstacle in the Negro pursuit towards freedom.”

body paragraph:

There should be 2-4 body paragraphs, depending on the length of the passage. Remember: go with the flow of the text, and don’t force yourself to write exactly 3 body paragraphs. 

The paragraphs should be organized chronologically through the text, not by technique! This means sectioning the text by paragraph (1, 2, 3) or breaking it into parts (beginning/ middle/ end), depending on the format of the passage. 

My body paragraphs generally follow this structure:

  • topic sentence- briefly describe what the paragraph is about. use transition words to identify the segment of the text you’re talking about 
  • 2-3 CSAs (basically examples)
    • claim: your position on the use of a rhetorical strategy
    • support: the quote, summary, or paraphrase of the text
    • analysis: explain how the strategy enhances the meaning and purpose of the text
  • synthesis to tie together the examples and state how they work together
  • closing sentence

Limit yourself to 2 strategies per paragraph to keep your essay focused. When writing under time constraints, I tend to be able to provide 2 examples of one strategy and 1 example of a second strategy, per paragraph, but that’s not a hard and fast rule.

conclusion paragraph:

Make this short and relevant. You’ll still have one more essay to go after this!

  • restate your thesis using different wording (1 sentence)
  • call to action, reflection, or extension (2-3 sentences)- it can be any of the following:
    • ask readers to evaluate the message of the piece
    • ask readers to agree with writer’s purpose
    • ask readers to examine how message is pertinent in modern-day
    • ask readers to reflect on the appropriateness of the piece in modern-day
    • another closing idea

anonymous asked:

What do you do when art block hits you?

GASP! THE BEAST. IT STRIKES WHEN YOU LEAST SUSPECT. LEADING TO FAILED ARTS. NO MOTIVATION. AND WORST OF ALL when you put it that way it sounds pretty painful.

So I’m going to preface this with this is how I combat my own lack of motivation. People are different than me. What works for me might not work for you. Sorry it got lengthy. I guess I had a lot to say about it. For that reason I’m putting it under a cut.
Also because I wanted to draw froggits.

Keep reading

Elizabeth Swann is easily one of the very top few fictional characters I consider a role model alright.

And if you think about it, she was more of a pirate than Will Turner like the movies led us to believe.

She was resourceful as all hell. Almost the exact same to Jack, but with some differences. While jack had the ability to see things 10 steps ahead and make fully thought out plans and be able to just watch everything fall into place, Elizabeth had the ability to adapt and evolve with new obstacles. She could maneuver situations in ways that almost no other character could. She even outplayed Jack fucking Sparrow. On more than one occasion if I might add.

She was well educated. And not like with maths and sciences and philosophy and shit like that. I mean educated in the way that she understood exactly how others thought and how they were most likely to act, and played them accordingly. She had educated herself on the pirates code well before even thinking of setting foot on a pirate vessel, and knew it well enough to save her neck or someone else more than once.

Now on to the more “pirate-like” shit.

She didn’t originally know sword fighting, but in the first movie she goes to grab a decorative sword off the wall in her manor (which doesn’t work, for comedies sake, but moving on) with the intention of fighting the pirates ransacking her home. Not run, like literally everyone else in the manor, but actually fight. Two men versus one untrained woman I might add. What a queen. But during the second movie we learn that Will taught her the art of sword fighting. And she very clearly was an excellent student, for throughout the next two movies we see her go toe-to-toe with several badass and notorious pirates, and easily hold her own. And if she didn’t have access to a sword, she made do and made a weapon out of whatever was near her at the time.

When her wedding got crashed and she and Will arrested, Will was told to find Jack in order to gain them both freedom again, and so he set off to do so. Elizabeth on the other hand, with some assistance, was able to escape prison, and then proceeded to hold the man who arrested them at gunpoint until he gave her signed and sealed papers containing the pardon they needed.

She also later figured out that the Kracken was really after jack, and knowing he wouldn’t give himself up for the good of the others, she kissed him long enough as a distraction at the last minute to handcuff him to the mast, effectively becoming the only person to be able to kill Jack Sparrow.

She also knew the power of carefully made lies and crafted deception. She knew being a woman could get her certain places and certain perks, so she made it work in her favor. She knew the same but with being a man, so she figured out how to also make that work in her favor. She was mistake for a feared sea goddess, and instead of denying it, she rolled with it knowing it would be to her benefit. Which it did, considering it then aided in her achieving the status as captain of a pirate ship later on, and in effect earning her a place as a Pirate Lord. And then was voted in as the Pirate King.

She used every piece of knowledge and tools accessible to her as intelligently as she could. She crafted lies and deceptions to work to the advantage of herself and/or her companions. And she never apologized for these actions or for being anyone but herself.

Will thought and planned more in reference to his heart or sometimes rash feelings. Elizabeth was an analyzer and thought and planned through both logic and impeccable gut feeling.

Elizabeth Swann was one of the best pirates in this whole series, and no one can tell me any different.

2

Tatiana Maslany by Brooke Nipar for Marie Claire, 2017

Playing so many strong and smart women who take down a mediocre man—it was the best. It was getting to put all the rage and fear and disappointment and need for action into our work. We were telling that story from day one about autonomy, and about community as opposed to individual, and about our differences actually uniting us and making us stronger. So to get to actually talk about this mediocre man at the top, take off his head, it was really cathartic. I remember the Women’s March was happening when we had press so I couldn’t go, which was totally devastating. But we were reading this script that was saying the things we all wanted to say and we were having these discussions on set constantly. And it was all feeding back into the work. I’m so grateful I was on a show where I got to do that, because I don’t know how I’d get through it otherwise.

Norse Magic: A Simplified Introduction

The terms “seiðr”, “spá”, and “galdr” are a few of the terms that get thrown around when discussing Norse magic. What do all of these words mean?

For starters, “seiðr”, “spá”, and “galdr” are not different words for the same type of practice. While these can all fit together, and usually those that do one often do the other, they each hold individual roles in Norse magic.


Seiðr

Seiðr, at its basic form, is trance induced magic that can be done while soul traveling the nine worlds. You can alter your destiny or even affect the destiny of others. If you are familiar with chaos magic, seiðr is like a school of shamanistic chaos magic (for example you can control your reality through actions done in trance work instead of through sigils). You can make use of energy work and heal yourself or others, alter someone’s opinion, thoughts, or actions concerning a certain situation, and even commune with the gods themselves and act as a channel for them to speak through. There is so much more concerning seiðr that can’t be covered in this paragraph, but will be expanded upon in future entries.

Spá

Spá or spá-craft is the art of seeing one’s fate. Just like the work of a seer, a spákona or spámaðr is able to tap into the threads of one’s fate, seeing what is to come or what they and their ancestors have experienced in the past.

Galdr

Galdr, meaning “incantation”, is the practice that uses the chants or songs of runes when practicing runic magic. Since you are working with focused vibrational energy, the practice of galdr can be extremely powerful when used properly.


While these are tremendously simplified descriptions of tremendously complex practices, it’s a good jumping off point for the different articles I’m going to write that will further explain them in detail. In future entries, I’ll start with discussing the foundations of seiðr and sharing ways in which you can start learning how to utilize it in your practice. Eventually, I will have articles concerning spá-craft and galdr. I look forward to sharing what I’ve experienced with everyone!

-Úlfeiðr

Noun modifier endings

Today I’ll give you an overview of noun modifier endings. I’m not sure if this is actually the proper term for it, but it’s what my teacher used back in the day!

Noun modifier endings are  actually applied to action verbs and descriptive verbs to change them into forms that can then be used to modify following nouns. More simply, they turn action or descriptive verbs into what we would in English call relative clauses and adjectives respectively

A relative clause is a clause starting with a relative pronoun, such as “that, who, which, etc,” that describes a noun. You can think of it as a long adjective. Let’s check out some examples in English first:

This is the cake that I ate.

In this example, “that I ate” is a relative clause that describes the cake.

The school where I met my friend is over there.

In this example, “where I met my friend” is a relative clause giving more information about the school.

And of course adjectives are simpler:

That pretty girl is my friend.

My brother is a friendly guy.

Now, let’s build some relative clauses and adjectives in Korean!


Action verbs

Present tense: -는 — The present tense noun modifier ending for action verbs is -는. Just slap it onto the root of your verb (keeping in mind any changes with irregular verbs) and you’re good to go!

  • The cake that that person sells is delicious. -> 그 사람이 파는 케이크는 맛있어요.
    • 팔다 - 다 = 팔 —–> 팔 + 는 = 파는 (ㄹ irregular verb- drop ㄹ before ㄴ)
  • The books that she reads are fun. -> 그녀가 읽는 책들은 재미있어요.
    • 읽다 - 다 = 읽 —–> 읽 + 는 = 읽는

Past tense: -(으)ㄴ — For verb roots that end with a consonant, add -은. For roots that end with a vowel, just add -ㄴ. Make sure to keep changes for irregular verbs in mind!

  • The kimbap that I ate was bland. -> 제가 먹은 김밥은 싱거웠어요. 
    • 먹다 - 다 = 먹 —–> 먹 + 은 = 먹은
  • The movie that we saw was boring. -> 우리가 영화는 지루했어요.
    • 보다 - 다 = 보 —–> 보 + ㄴ =

Past habitual: -던 — If you want to refer to an action that was done repeatedly or habitually in the past, attach -던 to the verb root.

  • The school that we attended is gone now. -> 우리가 다니던 학교는 이제 없어요.
    • 다니다 - 다 = 다니 —–> 다니 + 던 = 다니던
  • My mom sings the songs that grandma used to sing. -> 우리 엄마는 외할머니께서 부르시던 노래를 부르세요.
    • 부르다 - 다 = 부르 —–> 부르 + 던 = 부르던

Future tense: -(으)ㄹ —  Again, depending on if the root ends with a consonant (-을) or vowel (-ㄹ), you use a slightly different form.

  • The place I will go is far. -> 제가 곳이 멀어요.
    • 가다 - 다 = 가 —–> 가 + ㄹ =
  • The shoes I will wear tomorrow are new ones. -> 내일 신을 신발은 새 거예요.
    • 신다 - 다 = 신 —–> 신 + 을 = 신을


Descriptive verbs

Present tense: -(으)ㄴ — The present tense noun modifier endings for descriptive verbs look like the past tense noun modifier endings for action verbs. Make sure you use -은 for roots that end with consonants and -ㄴ when the root ends with a vowel.

  • That tall building is Lotte World Tower. -> 저 높은 건물은 롯데월드타워예요.
    • 높다 - 다 = 높 —–> 높 + 은 = 높은
  • That singer is a handsome man. -> 저 가수는 잘생긴 남자예요.
    • 잘생기다 - 다 = 잘생기 —–> 잘생기 + ㄴ = 잘생긴

Past tense: -던; -았/었던 — Just as we can use -던 with action verbs to indicate a habitual past action, we can use it with descriptive verbs to indicate that a state was continuous in the past. Using just -던 on its own gives a feeling of looking back on or reminiscing about something that may still be continuing to the present time. On the other hand, -았/었던 carries a feeling of “was X in the past, but is no longer.”

  • The girl who was pretty when she was young became a beautiful woman. ->어릴 때 예뻤던 소녀는 아름다운 여자가 됐어요.
    • 예쁘다 - 다 = 예쁘 —–> 예쁘 + 던 = 예뻤던
  • Mingyu, who was very diligent, still works hard. -> 부지런하던 민규 씨는 지금도 일을 열심히 해요. 
    • 부지런하다 - 다 = 부지런하 —–> 부지런하 + 던 = 부지런하던

Future tense: -(으)ㄹ — The future tense noun modifier endings for descriptive verbs are the same as for action verbs. As always, make sure that you make any needed changes for irregular verbs. Also, please note that [descriptive verb + -(으)ㄹ NOUN] is not a very commonly used structure unless it’s followed by the noun 것 (thing). However, that starts getting into full future tense, which isn’t the point of this post.

  • I am looking for a gift that will be good to give to my friend. -> 친구에게 주기에 좋을 선물을 찾고 있어요.
    • 좋다 - 다 = 좋 —–> 좋 + 을 = 좋을


Nouns

Nouns on their own can’t take noun modifier endings, but the endings can be attached to 이다 (to be). My notations of the forms the noun modifier endings take will include 이다 and be written as single units, but just be aware that they are actually 이다 plus the actual noun modifier ending.

Present tense: -인 — It’s the same regardless of whether the noun ends with a consonant or a vowel!

  • My friend, who is a teacher, is very smart. -> 선생님인 제 친구가 정말 똑똑해요.
  • That lady, who is an actress, often appears in dramas. -> 배우인 그녀는 드라마에 자주 나와요.

Past tense: -이었/였던 — -던 makes another appearance! This time it appears with 이다 conjugated to the past tense. Add -이었던 if the noun ends with a consonant and -였던 if it ends with a vowel.

  • Jimin, who was a model student, of course ended up attending a good university. -> 모범생이었던 지민이는 역시 좋은 대학교에 가게 됐어요.
  • Seungjin, who was Jimin’s friend, doesn’t contact him anymore. -> 지민 씨의 친구였던 승진 씨는 더 이상 지민 씨랑 연락을 안 해요.

Future tense: It’s sort of weird to use the future noun modifier ending -(으)ㄹ directly on 이다. Rather, you would use [NOUN이/가 될…]. This way, you are using the action verb 되다 to say that something or someone will be come something else. 

  • The man who will become Somin’s husband is very good-looking. -> 소민 씨의 남편이 될 남자는 정말 잘생겼어요.
  • Chanhyeong, who will become a doctor, has studied hard since he was young. -> 의사가 될 찬형이는 어릴 때부터 공부를 열심히 해왔어요.


Happy studying~

Cleric Week: New/Converted Spells

image credit: Josu Hernaiz

It’s hard to come up with new healing and buff spells for a system like 5e, so I converted a bunch of D&D 3.5e ones! They then gave me a few ideas so I sprinkled in a few of new spells, as well.

Delay Death

Necromancy spell. Clr 3.

One dying creature you can see within 30 ft. is warded from death and damage while you maintain concentration for up to 1 minute. That creature does not need to make death saving throws and damage does not cause them to gain an automatic failed death save. Only if the creature takes more than 20 damage from a single source do they gain a failed death save.

Divine Agility

Transmutation spell. Clr 4.

One creature you target has a DEX score of 20 for one minute using while you maintain concentration. This spell has no effect if the creature already has over 20 DEX.

Extract Poison

Transmutation spell. Clr 3.

One creature you touch is cured of poison and no longer suffers from the Poisoned condition as you extract the poison from their body and into a plain stone that could fit in the palm of your hand. The stone turns black and can be thrown at a range of 20/60 ft. When a creature is hit with a poisoned stone, it deals 1d4 bludgeoning damage plus 6d10 poison damage and the creature becomes Poisoned for 1 minute. A successful CON saving throw halves the poison damage and negates the Poisoned condition.

Faith Healing

Evocation spell. Clr 1.

As Cure Wounds, except that it heals 1d12 + your spellcasting ability modifier. However, this spell does not have any effect on creatures that do not worship your deity.

Holy Star

Conjuration spell. Clr 7.

You summon a mote of radiant light that hovers just over your shoulder. It remains there for 1 minute as long as you maintain concentration. The mote of light will do one of the following options of your choice during each of your turns. Each turn you may change what you wish for it to do. The star takes up no actions as it acts completely on its own through your will.

  • The star will negate the effects of up to 1d4+3 spell levels of spells cast that target only you until your next turn.
  • The star grants you +2 AC as it shields you from attacks until your next turn.
  • The star casts Sacred Flame using your spellcasting ability modifier and caster level against a target of your choice.

Mystic Aegis

Abjuration spell. Clr 3.

You may use your reaction to cast Mystic Aegis. The next time that a harmful spell targets only you, you may force the caster of the spell to make a CHA saving throw against your spell save DC. If they succeed, you reduce the damage of the incoming spell by half. If they fail, their spell has no effect on you and is wasted.

Resurgence

Abjuration spell. Clr 1.

You may cast Resurgence as a bonus action. One creature of your choice that can hear you may make another saving throw immediately against an ongoing spell or effect that is currently afflicting them. If the new saving throw succeeds, the effect ends.

Soul Vessel

Necromancy spell. Clr 4.

When a living creature dies within 60 ft. of you, you may use your reaction to cast Soul Vessel. The creature’s soul, instead of departing to the afterlife, is drawn into a focus of your spell. The focus must be a vessel of some kind (a jar, a vial, a basket, etc.). The creature’s soul is stored in the vessel and can be spoken with as if it was still alive. As long as the creature’s soul vessel is not destroyed or damaged, the creature can be resurrected up to 1 year later without the need for a body. A new one is formed out of material from the astral and ethereal planes.

Spiritual Adviser

Divination spell. Clr 3.

For up to ten minutes using concentration, a small whispering mote of light hovers just by your ear and gives you advice that you can only hear. While it is active, you have a +1 bonus to Insight and Perception skill checks. You can cast Augury up to three times while the spiritual adviser is active. After the third casting, the adviser vanishes and the spell ends.

Surge of Health

Evocation spell. Clr 2.

You may cast Surge of Health using different actions, having varying effects. You target one creature within 15 ft. that you can see.

  • If you cast Surge of Health as a reaction, the creature regains 1 hit point.
  • If you cast Surge of Health as a bonus action, the creature regains 1d4 hit points.
  • If you cast Surge of Health as an action, the creature regains 4d4 hit points.
  • If you cast Surge of Health over the course of 1 minute, the creature regains 8d4 hit points.

Unburden

Transmutation spell. Clr 1.

One creature you touch is no longer afflicted by a condition that you choose, a poison, a disease, a curse, or a spell currently afflicting it. You then become afflicted with the same condition, poison, disease, curse, or spell as if you had just gained it.

Vigor

Transmutation spell. Clr 2.

One creature you touch regains 1 hit point each round that it has at least 1 hit point for 1 minute. This spell does not require concentration. 

It’s really hard to put into words just how good the Power Rangers movie was, on many different levels. It was good as a Power Rangers movie. It was good as a summer action movie. It was good as an origin story and as a character piece.

It had just the right amount of cheese and heart and product placement that was hilarious in it’s bold, unapologetic use.

It was one of the only American produced films to have an Asian lead, and the majority of the cast were fully developed characters of color. A nerdy, sensitive, Black autistic teenage boy was the heart of the film.

I went in expecting nostalgia and aome good fights and left genuinely emotionally connected to those characters and I seriously hope they make the sequel they left a stinger for.