usable web

The Need for Web Design Standards

The entire concept of “Web design” is a misnomer. Individual project teams are not designing the Web any more than individual ants are designing an anthill. Site designers build components of a whole, especially now that users are viewing the entirety of the Web as a single, integrated resource.

Unfortunately, much of the Web is like an anthill built by ants on LSD: many sites don’t fit into the big picture, and are too difficult to use because they deviate from expected norms.

Several design elements are common enough that users expect them to work in a certain way. Here’s my definition of three different standardization levels:

  • Standard: 80% or more of websites use the same design approach. Users strongly expect standard elements to work a certain way when they visit a new site because that’s how things always work.
  • Convention: 50-79% of websites use the same design approach. With a convention, users expect elements to work a certain way when they visit a new site because that’s how things usually work.
  • Confusion: with these elements, no single design approach dominates, and even the most popular approach is used by at most 49% of websites. For such design elements, users don’t know what to expect when they visit a new site.

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OK IF YOU GET SOMETHING LIKE THIS THAT IS AN ADVERTISEMENT, GAME FROM SOMEONE YOU DO NOT KNOW, OR WANTS TO GET YOU TO FOLLOW LINKS ON THEIR BLOG. CHANCES ARE THEY ARE A PHISHING SCAMS

Phishing is the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money), often for malicious reasons, by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.[1][2] The word is a neologism created as a homophone of fishing due to the similarity of using fake bait in an attempt to catch a victim. Communications purporting to be from popular social web sites, auction sites, banks, online payment processors or IT administrators are commonly used to lure unsuspecting victims. Phishing emails may contain links to websites that are infected with malware.[3]Phishing is typically carried out by email spoofing[4] or instant messaging,[5] and it often directs users to enter details at a fake website whose look and feel are almost identical to the legitimate one. Phishing is an example of social engineering techniques used to deceive users,[6] and exploits the poor usability of current web security technologies.[7] Attempts to deal with the growing number of reported phishing incidents include legislation, user training, public awareness, and technical security measures. Many websites have now created secondary tools for applications, like maps for games, but they should be clearly marked as to who wrote them, and users should not use the same passwords anywhere on the internet.

Phishing is a continual threat that keeps growing to this day. The risk grows even larger in social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Myspace etc. Hackers commonly use these sites to attack persons using these media sites in their workplace, homes, or public in order to take personal and security information that can affect the user and the company (if in a workplace environment). Phishing is used to portray trust in the user since the user may not be able to tell that the site being visited or program being used is not real, and when this occurs is when the hacker has the chance to access the personal information such as passwords, usernames, security codes, and credit card numbers among other things.

IF YOU DID NOT WANT TO READ ALL THAT, IT MEANS THEY TRICK YOU AND YOUR COMPUTER INTO GIVING UP EVERY PERSONAL INFORMATION THEY CAN. IMAGINE MOM OR DAD LOOKING THROUGH YOUR PRIVATE MESSAGES ON YOUR CELLPHONE. THESE PEOPLE CREATE IDENTITY THEFT AND EVEN USE YOU TO EXPAND THEIR REACH BY CONTACTING ALL OF YOUR FRIENDS AND SO ON AND SO FORTH. AND WORSE. 

JUST AVOID THEM LIKE THE PLAGUE AND DELETE THEM!