usa&tod

Shout Out 2 All Bisexual+ People

Shout out to the bisexuals out here slutting it up. Shout out to the bisexuals who enjoy threesomes (or foursomes+) and take advantage of those opportunities. Much love to the polyamorous bisexuals and the bisexuals who say they’re bi-curious and those who don’t like sex at all.

Glory be to the trans, gender non-conforming and nonbinary bisexuals. Y'all foine AF.

Hugs to the bisexual+ women/femmes who leave their lesbian partners and eventually end up with male partners and vice versa. Relationships of all orientations end and don’t let anyone make you feel guilty for getting out or for moving forward with whomever you please. It’s your life. Fuck their judgment.

Bowing deep to all my black and brown bisexuals who have been shining in every way since humanity was a thing. Sending prayers of protection to all my immigrant and refugee bisexuals, restorative justice to my indigenous bisexuals and two-spirit folks, profound respect and recognition to all the elder bisexuals who got us here, and access to every single differently-abled bisexual on this planet.

Protection and healing to all the closeted bisexuals who feel like they have to use gay, lesbian or straight labels to survive. We’re here for you when and if ever you decide to take the glorious and terrifying leap.

Love to the bisexual+/pansexual/polysexual/omnisexual/asexual/biromantic/aro/fluid/no label/queer/questioning/OMG-I-don’t-know-sexuals just trying to find their way. Shout out to all the bisexuals under the vast bi+ umbrella who feel like a more specific label suits them a little better.

Love and light to the bisexuals who will hold onto their bi+ label and you’ll have to pry it from their cold dead hands. Bi+ is not binary (or transphobic) and pan is not sanctimonious (or transphobic). We are a community and we had better act like one because we can’t win without each other.

Eternal love, familial bonds and transformative wisdom to all the bisexuals out here trying to live our best lives, whether we fit their dusty and falsely monolithic stereotypes at times, or nah. We are more of the queer community than anyone else and our expressions of bisexuality are not always going to look or be the same. That’s ok. Just know that when the bi+ bat signal goes up and the bat phones ring, whatever your label, or lack thereof, we had better show up and show out. For all of us.

ID #37751

Name: Voss
Age: 17
Country: USA

I’m a teenager that has no clue what they’re doing.

I like astronomy, astrophysics, particle physics, (forensic) psychology/profiling, linguistics, literature and writing, computer science/programming, biology, chemistry, gardening. Pretty much anything that happens to exist within this universe (and some things that may or may not exist outside of it), if it is presented in a way that is not terrible, interests me, however.
I’m a gay guy from the northern part of VA, I have no clue what I’m doing in my life, and I hope that we can get along.

Preferences: I literally don’t care as long as you don’t actively despise me

maddkat98  asked:

Do you have any archives of racism between white and black American soldiers? While black and white soldiers were fighting in Vietnam, America was in the midst of the civil rights movement, so I'm wondering how much of the racial conflict was carried over to the front lines. Perhaps they united in being racist toward the Vietnamese at the time, but I'm not so sure. Vietnam war movies don't usually depict these conflicts, so I'm curious.

Funny you should ask, as I’m writing a paper this semester that focuses largely on the issue of racism in the military during the Vietnam era. It’s a very good question you ask, because you’re right in saying that popular culture does not offer any meaningful insight.

Yes, there was widespread racial tension in the military during the Vietnam War.

As the Civil Rights movement at home continued while American involvement in Vietnam drastically increased, these racial tensions grew. There seems to have been less racial incidents among combat troops while in the field, presumably because it benefited all parties to get along well. In the rear, however, there were numerous incidents. By 1968, the military was beginning to realize these tensions existed and were not going away.

Systematic, or institutional, racism also heavily affected African Americans. They were more susceptible to being drafted. They were less likely to access technical fields in the military due to poorer education, and therefore more heavily concentrated in combat units, and therefore had high casualty numbers. There was a lack of promotions for black soldiers. The military justice system was also a great source of this institutional racism. (See Westheider)

“United in being racist toward the Vietnamese” is an interesting thought. You might have heard the quote from Muhammad Ali: “I ain’t got no quarrel with them Viet Cong.” While it’s debated if he ever said this, the sentiment nonetheless rang true with many African Americans at the time. Their fight was at home, for their own rights and freedom, not against another brown-skinned man who had (and still was) experiencing oppression under the white man.

Books on the subject: