us support groups

anonymous asked:

Lololol I thought "team mom" was just the therm people used to group the "supportive parent" team leaders in haikyuu, the squad thing just giving a name to a group of characters with a similar feature? Like the "I have a thing for my ace squad" or the "loud squad" or the "stoic/ poker face" squad, I never thought of it in a negative way so thanks I feel more informed now

none of those other “squads” are aggressively gendered. they’re characteristics. and they aren’t associated with being feminine. 

also, daichi is way more of a “supportive parent” than suga. suga wants to watch the world burn. 

noelann  asked:

Hi! I am screwed and have a week to unfuck my habitat. I changed my unsername to protect the not innocent... me. I have a week to unfuck the apartment or i'll be evicted. depression, anxiety a heat wave and broken ac did me in. How do i post on twitter I could really use this group's support over the next week/ or i am totally fucked. I am new to tumbler so can't figure out how to post on the page! Thanks! N.

OK, folks, we have an unfucker who needs some support!

While you’re doing this (and honestly, good for you for reaching out and making the commitment to doing this!), make sure to take care of yourself and your health. Take plenty of breaks, stay hydrated, check in with your mental state pretty often, and don’t beat yourself up if you get off track a little. Give yourself plenty of rewards, listen to some good music or a favorite podcast, treat yourself gently and kindly, and keep your goal in sight.

You can do this!

I don’t want to be angry anymore. I want to be calm. I want to stop hurting people and blowing up all the time. I hate myself for it. It’s straining my relationship. It’s made my mom cry. I just lose it and blow up on anyone that’s near me when I’m mad and I know it isn’t fair but I feel like I can’t control it, and every time I go off I just get more angry at myself and it makes it worse. My anger is out of control and I don’t know how to fix it. I feel like the worst piece of shit.
—  Posted by Anonymous

anonymous asked:

Noctis? About him: Shiva ended up meeting me. She told me she took him to fulfill the prophesy while I was out to hand send the message and packages to you. There's nothing that can be done on my side of things, unfortunately. The astrals are stubborn mules who aren't bothered to clean up the consequences of their actions.

Shiva did WHAT, NAO?

… Shiva, you mah bitch n all, but I stg…

Wouldn’t be the first time I challenged the gods.

… lowkey tho, can we talk about how effed up (…spoilers) Noct’s fate is? Ifrit went and betrayed them all and unleashed the Starscourge. And instead of being like, “that’s fucked up let’s take care of our own mess here”, they was like “k so this human line is going to be created for the sole purpose of protecting this Crystal and breeding a savior that we sacrifice to get rid of this shit”.

Why are gods so fucking extra with it? Noct helped get rid of Ifrit and still had to die in the end. Hurts me deeply.

If Yuna in FFX could escape her own fate of dying in some stupid ass millennia old sacrificial lamb shit, there’s no reason why Noct couldn’t find himself a loophole.

lgbt used to be a support group for minorities to find love and acceptance from others. straight allies were welcomed and appreciated.

now lgbt is just a game of whos the most oppressed and talking about cishet genocide and made up microlabels :/

if you talk about the “dirty cishets” you get no support from me

This took longer than I would like to admit 

Sooo apparently @artsymeeshee and me are creating a club for awkward potatoes like us! 

If you’re ever too scared or shy to talk to someone don’t fret, we’re all scared and shy too xD But we should try to push that fear aside and still give it a shot! Who knows? Maybe you’ll find a new friend! :D 

 Come join us  in this support group of awkward people! Everyone is welcome to join! 

hey so I was just thinking about this because all of the friends that I’m out to are heading to our local Pride tomorrow and due to family beliefs, I’m not allowed to go. A lot of them are cishet and going purely to support their friends, like me. so if this pride month you can’t celebrate openly for any reason, know that my friends are out there for you, and they promised me to bring you all along in spirit.

anonymous asked:

Any advice for parents wanting to home school? I'm scared people are going to advise me of being a brain washing cultist.

I’ve been SOOO excited to answer this ask because I have so many good things to say about homeschooling! Actually, if I’m honest, I have absolutely nothing bad I can possibly think of. I was homeschooled all the way through 12th grade and there is nothing I would change. I will ALWAYS be grateful to my parents for devoting themselves to me in that way, and especially my mom for sticking with it - from the rocky years of highschool, to back when I was an elementary brat. Looking back, we agree it was worth any struggles tenfold.

The first thing you need to know is this: you will be ridiculed. At some point, somewhere, someone is going to criticize you. Whether it be your teaching, your abilities, your discipline, or your morals, the world is going to try and push you down. Therefore, you need to be confident, you need to know your motivation as to why you are doing this, and know that, as the parent, only you know what is best for your child.

A good way to kindly explain that to someone is to know the benefits of homeschooling. And the list is long!

— Homeschooling gives you the freedom to specifically tailor the curriculum to your child’s needs. Whether going slower or faster, you can go at a pace that is comfortable to you and your child. For example, division was a nightmare for me as a child, but I was reading at a 12th grade level by early grade school. Therefore my algebra was slow moving and required a lot of repetition, but I blew through English.

— Homeschool students as a whole score significantly higher on standardized testing, with the low range being 15-30% improvement, and typically score above the average collage admission test. All of this is regardless of the education level of the parents and any degree of formal they may have. You don’t need to be a certified teacher or have lofty degrees to teach your children effectively.

— Building off both the other points, I would argue that homeschooling leaves you over prepared for college. I briefly mentioned math is not my strongest suit. I thought, in going to college, that I would be behind, but I actually placed significantly higher than I thought I would. Socially, homeschoolers are generally more prepared as well, for as where public schoolers function primarily with their same age group, homeschoolers tend to be more accustomed to a variety of ages - from toddlers to senior citizens - and that can allow one to adapt well into different class, work, and social settings.

— For those with illnesses, physical or mental limitations, homeschooling’ flexibility is a definite asset, as it allows you to modify your schedule as needed, even on a day-by-day basis, and you don’t have the stress and pressure of missing school days - you can do the work when it is convenient for you.

— Homeschooling encourages enjoyable learning and self-motivation. I going to the aquarium and watching the school kids have to breeze through it in two or three hours. But for us homeschoolers, we could spend all day there, and we did! Why? Because I found it fascinating! I would read every brochure on the tropical fish, ask questions of the staff as I pet sharks and sting rays. Homeschooling doesn’t limit learning, it encourages exploration and deep thinking. You don’t have to rush through.

— Homeschooling encourages family bonding. Most the time, we all did school in the same room, either at the kitchen counter or consuming the kitchen table in books and papers. We would take a break from math and mom would read to us everything from history to science to fiction. Reading was a huge part of my homeschool life, and even now that I’ve long since graduated, my family still likes to read aloud together.

— It saves time. Where my public school friends were in school for eight hours a day and then spent several hours on homework, I got my school done in an average of four hours max. I would be done by noon, and the out climbing trees with my brother for the rest of the day. Learn about the world and then go live in it! I would have missed out on so much if I hadn’t been homeschooled.

— This next point is very important when you’re talking about “brain washing”. Public schools are growing increasingly more aggressive toward adverse opinions, any mention of God, and in many cases are implementing revisionist history. Not even biology is taught correctly anymore with this distorted view of sexuality. Homeschooling allows multiple view points to be explored and allows for deep research into why such a point is incorrect, what actually happened historically, ect. Public schools expect things to be taken at face value too much of the time. Homeschooling promotes critical thinking and exploration. You don’t just slam the door on counter views, you talk about them and discuss it. Additionally, homeschooling is not just for the religious. There are many people, including atheists, that homeschool simply because they recognize the benefits to their lifestyle and, most importantly, their child.

— Homeschooling protects your child. We have all heard people talk about how “sheltered” homeschoolers are. The only thing I was ever sheltered from was bullying, profanity, sexual jokes and harassment, violence, and peer pressure. I had many social circles and events (the joke among homeschoolers is often that they’re never home), but it was always in a positive environment. I would have been so much more insecure if I had had to face the things all my public school friends did, but instead I grew up knowing I could be confident in who I was. On the same note, it is important to make sure your child has a healthy amount of social interaction. Awana, youth group, various clubs, sports, are just a few ways you can make sure your child is active.

— Homeschooling saves money. Both within your home, and in regard to tax dollars spent toward public schools. There are great monetary and economical benefits to homeschooling.

— Public schools are a fairly modern development. For thousands of years the bulk of one’s early learning was done at home or in a relatively small school where you still received that one-on-one instruction - very similar to homeschooling. The norm was not 30-40 kids with one teacher. It wasn’t the massed produced learning you see today.

Now a few more things before we go…

There is a HUGE array of curriculum out there, you can pick and choose from a virtually endless myriad of resources. Find what works for your child. Know that often what works for child #1 does not work for child #2. I went through three math books until I found what really worked for me. Don’t be afraid to try different things. (And also look for homeschool book sales to buy at! You can save lots by buying used)

FIND A SUPPORT GROUP. This is HUGE for you as a parent because when challenges arise, and I PROMISE you they will, you are going to want someplace to look for solid advice. A network of good friends, co-ops, homeschool church groups, homeschool academies - whatever it is, find a group of homeschoolers near you where you can ask questions, present your challenges, and get positive feedback. More so than that though, you need encouragement. The best people to give that to you are people who have been in the same spot.

Know your legal rights as a homeschooler. I would highly advice checking out the Homeschool Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). They have fantastic resources on a general basis, but it is really important to know your rights as a homeschooling parent. At the very minimum, check out the state requirements and know what you’re obligated to do. When I was homeschooled, I didn’t need to take hardly any standardized tests, but there were a lot of people saying I needed to. So even small things like that are really important to know (it saved me a lot of anxiety).

Homeschooling isn’t always easy, but I promise you that the rewards far outweigh the cost. It is worth every moment. There are few ways better than this to show your child just how very much you love them.

Last thing! I came across this nifty page with all sorts of facts and statistics on homeschooling that is an easy and enlightening read [x] and a quick shout out to my many friends that brainstormed with me on this (readers, I hope you know you’re getting the best advice out there thanks to them! ^^ )

21 things you can do now to organize in your own community, brought to you by some of our generation’s leading activists and organizers.

1. Get familiar with your elected officials. Take a couple of minutes to double check your elected officials, their voting records and public stances. Whether you agree with them politically or not, learning a bit more about elected officials can be an effective way to understand and humanize them. Find your elected representatives here. — Mallika Madhusudan

2. Call and meet with your representatives. Politics is local, so contact your elected representatives on issues that matter to you. Whether it’s a member of your local school board or your senator, here’s how to do that effectively. Document your meetings on social media, on a podcast, in video or in writing. What did you discuss? What did you learn? How did it change your opinion or make you see things in a new way? Elected officials regularly review phone calls from constituents to get a sense of how they should vote. So this absolutely matters. Make your voice heard. Literally. — Mark Kogan

3. Lead a protest at your representative’s local office. Hashtag protests might get us likes, but they rarely change policy. Remember, most elected officials are not savvy on social media. So if you really want to make your voice heard, gather a group of friends and lead a protest outside your elected official’s local office. Call your local television station before you do so and make sure they bring their cameras. Alert reporters at local media companies and make sure they write about it. Even a group as small as 20 people can make a big difference if they are vocal and get attention. This kind of pressure becomes impossible for elected officials to ignore. — Mark Kogan

4. Run for office. There are over a half million elected officials in our country, and elections happen every year! Check out the new site RunforOffice.org or RunforAmerica.us to get started. Maybe it’s for your school board, town council, neighborhood commission or something else. Running for office is the highest expression of citizenship and one of the most important contributions to our system of self-government. — Nick Troiano

5. Take action every day. Sign up at www.FightTrump.co to receive a single action you can take every day. For example, this week you can call members of Congress and read them excerpts from Breitbart stories to protest Trump’s appointment of Steve Bannon to the White House. #FightTrump will send you actions you can do every week, every month and after Jan. 20, when Trump actually takes power. Get involved. Act. — Mark Kogan

6. Understand your local and state voting processes. Registering to vote is not as easy as it sounds — particularly for certain demographics, those without access to driver’s licenses or those without easy access to online or mobile registration. Investigate how people different from you experience voting. Learn about the challenges they face, such as voter suppression and disenfranchising regulations. — Shreya Ganeshan

7. Construct local monuments. When the Berlin Wall fell and so many countries were freed from Soviet-style communism, some of the first actions they took were to bury the dead, lay flowers at important public spaces and consecrate the public spaces that were now sacred sites for new democracies. Communities in profound political transition need to mourn. What are the sacred spaces in our communities right now — those that remind us what democracy means and why we will fight to keep it alive? How do we consecrate them and make them into places where we can all continue to meet and remember why we care about this country so much? — Szelena Gray

8. Fight to reform our political system. The operating system of our democracy needs an upgrade. Many of the structural incentives work to push us apart rather than bring us together. Support groups that are working to reform our political process. For example, FairVote is working on redistricting reform, Electoral College reform and voting reform. Some of these reforms can start at a local level. — Nick Troiano

9. Meet your fellow Americans. Try to meet and hold discussions with people unlike you. Get to know your fellow Americans. Strike up pen-pal connections or organize Skype and FaceTime chats with folks in different communities from your own. Focus on discussing tough issues and getting to know what is important to one another. — Mark Kogan

10. Move your money. Donating to worthy causes is an important way to make change. But if you don’t have a bunch of money to spare, commit to changing the way you spend the money you do have. Support black-owned businesses. Or consider moving your bank account from a large bank to a community bank or credit union. I recommend Amalgamated Bank. — Joelle Gamble

11. Commit to national service. Serve your community and the country by participating in public service. Participate in projects that emphasize community building and recovery. You don’t have to join the military or AmeriCorps: Find a local community project or state effort, meet people and help improve the lives of the people around you. — Mark Kogan

12. Make a plan for civic purpose. Check out Pathways, a nonpartisan civic leadership program. It’s a unique approach that provides a space where people can identify, plan and make moves toward their civic purpose. The idea is that people have to identify and own their decisions themselves, not be persuaded what to do. It’s intentionally nonpartisan and uses methodologies from several fields to design a program structure that is as empowering as possible. — Alex Torpey, Pathways program director

13. Disrupt the two-party duopoly. Both parties are over 150 years old! They no longer represent most Americans. We’re the generation that has revolutionized virtually every other industry, and it’s time we did the same for politics. A majority of millennials are political independents who consider themselves “fiscally conservative and socially liberal.” The Centrist Project is organizing this movement. Get involved and help shape it. — Nick Troiano, Centrist Project executive director

14. Exit your bubble. Diversify your news sources. Use an aggregator like RealClearPolitics for daily opinion pieces across the political spectrum. If you’re conservative-leaning, get a subscription to the New York Times. If you’re progressive-leaning, get a subscription to the Wall Street Journal. Recognize that your social media feed is likely an echo chamber and proactively work to challenge your thinking. — Nick Troiano

15. Learn from work being done globally. There is incredible work being done overseas, which provides valuable insights that can be applied to doing better community empowerment in the United States. So much “development” at home and abroad ignores the agency of a particular community. Organizations like Spark MicroGrants do really amazing jobs at being authentically community driven. — Alex Torpey

16. “Bring us together.” Richard Nixon adopted this slogan during his campaign after his aides saw a teenager carrying a sign with those words during a rally in Ohio. This should be the message we bring to every elected official after 2016. Bring us together, please. Make this the next political sign on your lawn, the next branded message on your social media profile — just make it the next thing you ask your elected official to do. Because it is the single most important thing for any of our leaders to do now. — Szelena Gray

17. Rebuild the Democratic Party. Go join that Democratic town committee you once joked about being a retirement home, and get your friends to come. Find your state offices and ask them for a calendar of events. Recruit the bravest, smartest people you know to run for local office. Or maybe you should run. Challenge elected officials in both parties to do better. Swamp their offices, jam their phone lines, list your demands. — Frank Chi

18. Go home more often. This Thanksgiving, remember that even one’s own family members and friends might be outside your political-thinking bubble. Acceptance and change can be hard without any exposure but might be easier coming from a loved one. Are you a transplant to a city from a small town or rural area? Do you work on this every day but your family in the suburbs doesn’t think about it much? Visit your family, visit other people’s families, share what’s important to you and organize within them. We need to show our representatives that we value compromise and coming together. —  Adrienne Scott and Brenna Conway

19. Stay woke. Rhetoric can persuade and mislead. As a new administration takes hold, there will be a flood of talk about what will and will not come out of Washington. Our job is to pay attention now, not a few weeks before the next election. Politicians can make promises and change stances. But actions speak louder than words. Learn who is being put in charge of government, research their background and see if what actions they talk about actually align with the change you hope to see. Sign up for listservs and updates from organizations who care about government accountability. Follow organizations who have a mission of fighting for the communities you care about. — Joelle Gamble

20. Challenge others to keep caring. A lot of people are really upset right now — far beyond individuals who are generally politically engaged and even beyond those who generally vote. Keep bugging your friends, family and neighbors to stay engaged. When you do something political or issue-driven, bring someone along. — Dominic Russel

21. Activate your skill set and leverage your expertise. Are you a creative in advertising? Design the resistance. Are you a developer in tech? Create technology for organizers. Are you in entertainment and work with celebrities who are outraged? Make sure they amplify the voices of those on the front lines. We shouldn’t all be doing just one thing. We should all be doing what we are best at. Moments like this require us to ask what we are experts on and how we can maximize our skill sets and our networks to make the most impact. — Frank Chi

(full article)

[Petition for the Motion Picture Association of America film rating system to start a Mack specific rating.  This is all for future generations of gay women ofc. We are already hopeless.

#mackenzie davis #i feel personally attacked #every time she wears menswear #EVERY TIME]

(Snipped from this post I’ve reblogged several times already)

@spacebikechronicles I propose a rating system for future generations, and some kind of hotline for us ~elders~, and possibly support groups that hold various weekly meetings

For the people who have asked me for help with transition things who are pre hrt I’m leaving some type of info you might be able to use. I’ll also leave a small faq of the questions I get asked when it’s for help.

1. First find a gender therapist in your area. That is step one. If you’re confused about how you feel talk to them. If you know that you are trans 100% be upfront with them abount wanting to start hormones to fast track your experience.

2. Once you get a note from your therapist that says it’s ok for you to start hrt, take the note to a doctor you trust. Use google for doctors who know about trans related things. If there isn’t one that knows ask them to research it for you, they are doctors.

3. Once you get blood work done you can get your prescription. If you have money to blow and aren’t afraid of needles go for injections. They seem to work the fastest and when I was on them I noticed things v quickly. Otherwise go for pills they are generally much cheaper and easy because you just have to take them orally.

4. Hormones are different for everyone. What will generally happen though is that you will gain fat in new places that are more “feminine” being butt, boobs, face, thighs. If you’re on a diet where you don’t consume enough calories the fat will probably be minimal. It should also help with body hair growth but it’s not 100% for everyone.

5. It takes time for changes to happen. You will most likely not be “passing” within 3 months or maybe even 6 months. 

6. You are not alone. Every trans person faces somewhat similar problems. My advice now is to find a support group online. emptyclosets.com seems like a generally nice one. Personally I would not advise using tumblr as a support group but that’s based off my experiences. A real support group is not going to fetishize you from every angle. If you find a support group do not fall into a “woe is me” attitude. Try to find positive influences. Transitioning will eventually not control you’re life and realize you are more than just a trans person.

I hope everyone finds a way to make their dreams come true, transitioning is very hard. There is no simple transition with anyone but you can do it but remember to stay safe and smart.

Good luck everyone.