us public health

Children with type 1 diabetes can’t go to public school

Woah, hold on. I know that this statement is obviously an enormous, ignorant lie. You know that this statement is obviously an enormous, ignorant lie. But some school officials in the U.S. DO NOT think this is an enormous, ignorant, lie. Actually, they think it’s completely reasonable and are ignoring federally regulated protocol by refusing to provide care for children with type 1 diabetes.

Originally posted by laviedunpanda

What am I talking about? An article in today’s New York Times reported that in some U.S. states children with T1D are being denied access to public school, field trips, or physical activities because school officials basically do not want to deal with the “risks” associated with the disease.

Perhaps the most jarring quote in the article is this one: 

“Parents have been told no school employee is willing to inject lifesaving glucagon even if their child falls unconscious.“

In other words, there are schools in the U.S. that would rather have a child DIE on their premises than provide them with proper care for their completely manageable disease. 

Originally posted by katsgiflibrary

I’m not usually one to throw about this type of terminology, but I CAN’T EVEN right now. 

684. Harry, taking the scrapbook with his parents' memories that Hagrid gave him, finds a few empty pages in the back and fills them with pictures of him and Ginny. It is now one of the most treasured items in the Potter house.

submitted by the-littleoak

3

The U.S. Army has kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers since 2009 for “misconduct,” after they returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and were diagnosed with mental health disorders and traumatic brain injuries. That means many of those soldiers are not receiving the crucial treatment or retirement and health care benefits they would have received with an honorable discharge.

The Army has taken these actions despite a 2009 federal law designed to ensure that troops whose mental illness might be linked to the wars aren’t cast aside.

That’s the finding of a joint investigation by NPR and Colorado Public Radio that listened to hours of secret recordings, looked at hundreds of pages of confidential military documents and interviewed dozens of sources both inside and outside the base.

One of the Army’s top officials who oversee mental health, Lt. Col. Chris Ivany, told NPR and CPR that the Army is not violating the spirit of the 2009 law by dismissing those soldiers for misconduct.

He says the soldiers’ “functional impairment was not severe” enough in some cases to affect their judgment. In other cases, the soldiers’ disorders might have been serious when they were diagnosed, but their “condition subsequently improved” before they committed misconduct — so they can’t blame the war for causing them to misbehave.

NPR and CPR also obtained the soldiers’ records, with their permission, and asked three independent psychiatrists to review them. Two of those psychiatrists served as top medical officers in the military. All three say that based on the records they saw, they would have advised the Army not to kick out these soldiers for misconduct.

“Especially for our soldiers who are coming back, not just with post-traumatic stress disorder, but with traumatic brain injury and other wounds, I really think that we as a society need to take that into account,” says Col. Elspeth Ritchie, who served as the Army’s top adviser on mental health during some of the worst fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. “I think as a society, they deserve to have us do everything we can to support them. I absolutely would want them to get the benefit of the doubt.”

Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

Photos (from top): Eric James with his mother, Beverly Morris, and father, Robert James. Eric secretly recorded more than 20 hours of sessions he had with behavioral health specialists and Army officials; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio. James Vanni, at his home in Colorado Springs, Colo. Vanni was dismissed from the Army without benefits; Theo Stroomer for NPR. Larry Morrison, who is appealing the Army’s decision to dismiss him for misconduct; Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

On Being a Non-Native

Dear Tumblr,

I am surrounded by beauty.  Each day I am greeted by the sun rising over the mountains on my morning walk to work.  Weekend hikes take me to awe-inspiring views.  This is sharply contrasted by the people I am here to serve.  People who are marginalized and forgotten about by most of society.  People who have welcomed me into their lives.

I elected to spend a month working for the Indian Health Service because, quite frankly, I am ignorant about Native Americans.  I come from a white, middle class background and my exposure to cultures not my own is lacking.  Though many of my peers are seeking to do audition rotations or overseas trips for 4th year, I wanted to broaden my experiences here in my own country.  So my girlfriend and I packed up the car and drove to our assigned Native American reservation.

The health problems here are dramatic.  Crime and violence reach rates seen in downtown L.A.  Patients are brought to the Emergency Department with BACs of 0.80 and walk out with BACs of 0.40 (for the record you are considered driving impaired when your BAC is 0.08).  Some areas of the reservation seem more like 3rd world countries in regards to poverty and living condition.  The impact of western culture is ever present in the sky-high diabetes rates.  

But the people are kind and noble.  They are more than the statistics presented about their population.  They are intelligent, yet quiet.  After just a few weeks I am finding myself comfortable in their presence, and more adept at making them comfortable in mine.  My introduction now includes a brief joke; my interview is less direct than what I might use with anglo people in my own community. 

The hospital we work for is small enough that providers literally work in all departments.  Board certified pediatricians see adults; internists see pregnant patients.  Hospital Wi-Fi is non-existent, and sometimes the internet is so slow we use paper charts.  It is a magical community where doctors practice the type of medicine I dreamt about before med school.  My heart feels a longing to stay in this simpler place forever. 

But this cannot last.  Before long I have to return to the hustle and bustle of an academic medical center.  My hospital has its own magic, thought it has lost its luster from the hours and hours I have spent inside its walls.  Perhaps it will seem a bit shinier when I return; or perhaps I will shine a bit brighter from this experience.  And maybe I will return one day, to this mountain hospital.  But for now I have to begin preparing for my next big training adventure.  

T-minus 6 months until I officially become an MD.      

Hopefully I will have time to write more about my experiences in the coming days.

Always yours,

The Disagreeable Doctor

Light It Up Blue is an annual reminder that Autism Speaks can't make us go away

Today is Autism Acceptance Day, and April is Autism Acceptance month. It’s also an annual reminder that we are strong, we are still here, and that attempts to eliminate us are failing. When they light it up blue, they’re admitting that they’re weak and they’re failing.

Autism Speaks and others who wish that autistic people didn’t exist think that it’s Autism Awareness Day. They’re calling us a public health crisis, and they’re trying to get others to agree with them and give them money. They want to get rid of us. They try to pretend they have any chance of succeeding.

I realized today that April 2nd is actually an annual reminder that, no matter how hard they try, they can’t actually get rid of us. When Autism Speaks supporters are turning on blue lights, what they’re really saying is that they have just spent another year wasting a lot of money in a completely futile attempt to get rid of us. They are acknowledging with those blue lights that we are still here, and that we’re not going anywhere.

We are more powerful than they want us to believe. We have persisted in existing despite their pervasive attempt to eliminate us. We are succeeding in spreading love and supporting one another in power and pride.

We are speaking up. We are being heard. People who care about autism, autistic people, education, and communication are listening. The tide is turning.

Their hate symbols are a sign that, even though we have far less money and far fewer resources, we are more powerful than their ineffectual attempts to make us go away. We are right, and we are strong, and we will be here long after Autism Speaks is gone. We ought to keep that in mind when we see the pathetic hate symbols they’re displaying today.

youtube

Surgeon General and Elmo team up to talk vaccinations

youtube

Worse Than We Thought

The 1964, the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health found that smoking causes lung cancer. Today, we know the impact of smoking on health and well-being is far worse. Worse Than We Thought” explores the staggering health effects of smoking that are outlined in this year’s 50th anniversary Surgeon General’s Report. 20 million people have died from smoking in the last half century, including 2.5 million nonsmokers who died from diseases caused by exposure to secondhand smoke. 

(From CDC)

theguardian.com
At least 33 US cities used water testing 'cheats' over lead concerns
Exclusive: A Guardian investigation reveals that testing regimes similar to that of Flint were in place in major cities including Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia
By Jessica Glenza

At least 33 cities across 17 US states have used water testing “cheats” that potentially conceal dangerous levels of lead, a Guardian investigation launched in the wake of the toxic water crisis in Flint, Michigan, has found.

Of these cities, 21 used the same water testing methods that prompted criminal charges against three government employees in Flint over their role in one of the US’ worst public health disasters.

The crisis that gripped Flint is an extreme case where a cost-cutting decision to divert the city’s water supply to a polluted river was compounded by a poor testing regime and delays by environmental officials to respond to the health emergency.

The Guardian’s investigation demonstrates that similar testing regimeswere in place in cities including Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Detroit and Milwaukee.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal:

  • Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water.
  • Officials in two major cities – Philadelphia and Chicago – asked employees to test water safety in their own homes.
  • Two states – Michigan and New Hampshire – advised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels.
  • Some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.