us president quotes

The signs as musical theatre responses to the US election results
  • Aries: No no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no
  • Taurus: I dreamed a dream in time gone by, when hope was high and life worth living
  • Gemini: You've torn it all apart, I'm watching it burn
  • Cancer: You have invented a new kind of stupid a damage you can never undo kind of stupid
  • Leo: There's a moment you know you're fucked
  • Virgo: Go and hide and run away
  • Libra: Why God, why today?
  • Scorpio: Even the darkest night will end and the sun will rise
  • Sagittarius: I know him, that can't be
  • Capricorn: See it's your fault. No. Yes it's your fault
  • Aquarius: Do you hear the people sing? Singing the songs of angry men?
  • Pisces: Holy shit, holy shit, holy shit holy shit holy shit holy shit
2

February 20th 1862: William Lincoln dies

On this day in 1862, William Wallace Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln, died aged eleven. Known as ‘Willie’, he died due to illness which was most likely typhoid fever. His brother Tad also became ill, but later recovered, though the illness greatly troubled his family, who feared they would lose another son. Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd were deeply affected by Willie’s death, with President Lincoln not returning to work for three weeks and Mary Todd being so distraught that her husband feared for her sanity. His son’s death occurred in the midst of Lincoln’s presidency, and in the second year of the American Civil War that was prompted by the election of the anti-slavery Republican Lincoln. Despite these personal setbacks, Lincoln successfully oversaw the Union’s victory in the Civil War and the abolition of slavery - leading to him being known as the ‘great emancipator’.

“My poor boy. He was too good for this earth. God has called him home. I know that he is much better off in heaven, but then we loved him so. It is hard, hard to have him die!”
- Lincoln upon his son’s death

Donald Trump is many things.

He’s the kid in school that I avoided in the hallways.

The one I made sure to never meet eyes with.

He’s the kid who cheated off me in 5th grade.

He’s the same kid that I got stuck doing a group project with in seventh grade, where I was stuck doing all the work.

He’s the teacher that didn’t listen to my friend and didn’t care to meet with them for extra help after class.

He’s the employer that belittles women when talking with the guys but claims he is not sexist.

He’s the guy who says he has no problem with ‘colored people’ but just by the way he says it you can tell he does.

He’s the guy that you wonder if they really mean what they say because what they are speaking is so awful.

He’s the adult that got mad when I asked about something I didn’t understand.

The same guy who was ready to challenge everything I said because they had a problem with being incorrect.

He’s the man who sexually assaulted my friend and somehow didn’t get jail time.

He’s the guy I’m afraid of because their ways of thinking is how wars begin.

He’s the man I would never want a daughter of mine to marry.

He’s the man I would try to teach my son to never be.

He is nothing but a bully.

He’s the guy that is showing that the U.S. is not free and can in fact be bought.

He’s everything I would never want myself nor my country to be.

—  MB
2

May 10th 1872: Victoria Woodhull nominated for President

On this day in 1872, Victoria Woodhull became the first woman to be nominated for the Presidency of the United States. Born to a poor family in Ohio in 1838, she married at age 15, but later divorced her loutish husband and married a colonel. After moving to New York, Victoria and her sister Tennessee - with whom she had worked as a clairvoyant - established the first woman-run stock brokerage company and created a radical weekly publication. In the magazine, the sisters articulated their vision for social reform embracing female suffrage, birth control rights, and ‘free love’. Their journal also advocated workers’ rights, calling for the 8 hour work day and graduated income tax, and publishing the first English translation of Karl Marx’s The Communist Manifesto. Victoria became such a prominent figure that she was invited to testify before Congress on female suffrage. In 1872, despite women being barred from voting, Woodhull was nominated as the presidential candidate of the Equal Rights Party; she selected famed black abolitionist Frederick Douglass as her running mate. Woodhull’s radical rhetoric alarmed moderate elements of the feminist and reform movements, limiting her electoral appeal. The 1872 campaign - between incumbent Republican Ulysses S. Grant and Democrat Horace Greeley -  quickly became acrimonious, and Woodhull’s opponents accused her of adultery. On election day, after retaliating against her critics and publishing accusations of adultery against them, she was in prison for distributing ‘obscene’ literature. Woodhull also did not appear on the ballot, as she was one year under the Constitutionally required age of 35, and won a minute percentage of the vote. Hounded by law enforcement and critics, Woodhull moved to England in 1877, where she continued her activism until her death in 1927. With a major American party poised to nominate a woman for president, it is fitting to remember Victoria Woodhull’s historic campaign.

“I come before you to declare that my sex are entitled to the inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

ICE CREAM MEMES
  • Obama: well America, it's nearly the end of my presidency, and overall, it has been wonderful working with you.
  • America: yeah, I'm going to miss your memes- I meant... your ice... cream!
  • Obama:
  • America:
  • Obama: I take back what I said.
Sing It With Me

“Do you hear the people sing?

Lost in the valley of the night

It is the music of a people who are climbing to the light

For the wretched of the Earth

There is a flame that never dies

Even the darkest night will end and the sun will rise.”

5

September 11th 2001: 9/11 Terror Attacks

On this day in 2001, thirteen years ago today, two hijacked planes were crashed into the World Trade Center towers in New York City and another into the Pentagon building in Virginia. The Twin Towers collapsed and part of the Pentagon was badly damaged. A fourth plane was intended to strike the US Capitol Building in Washington DC but its passengers seized control from the hijackers and crashed the plane into a field in Pennsylvania. Nearly 3,000 people died on this terrible day and thousands more injured in the attacks which sent shockwaves around the world. The attacks were planned and carried out by members of the terrorist group al-Qaeda, and masterminded by Osama bin Laden, who was since been found and killed by US forces. The aftermath of the tragedy prompted greater focus on national security both in the US and abroad and contributed to the invasions of, and subsequent wars in, Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, thirteen years on, we remember the thousands of people who lost their lives on 9/11.

“America is under attack”
- White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card telling President Bush about the attacks

3

April 30th 1789: Washington inaugurated

On this day in 1789 the leading general of the War of Independence and one of the framers of the Constitution, George Washington, was inaugurated first President of the United States on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York City. He was unanimously chosen President by the Electoral College and the runner-up, John Adams, became Vice President. At his inauguration, Washington set the first of many precedents in making an inaugural address. In office, he created a stable and strong national government with a cabinet system and ensured neutrality in the European wars. Washington was re-elected in 1792 but stepped down after two terms, thus setting the precedent that Presidents usually served two terms (this became part of the Constitution with the 22nd Amendment in 1951). Washington is still considered one of the greatest, if not the greatest, President in history for his systematic, effective and thoughtful leadership.

“Long live George Washington, President of the United States!”
- New York Chancellor Livingston upon swearing in the President