us mexico

independent.co.uk
Donald Trump is going to publish a weekly list of crimes committed by immigrants
Donald Trump has ordered his new administration to publish a weekly list of crimes committed by immigrants. The US President’s sweeping new executive order on immigration, which he signed on the fifth day of his presidency, includes a paragraph mandating the Secretary for Homeland Security to “make public a comprehensive list of criminal actions committed by aliens” in the US. The list will also include details of so-called “sanctuary cities” that refuse to hand over immigrant residents for deportation.

Donald Trump is a Nazi. He has assembled a cabinet of Nazis to run his fascist regime. He doesn’t call himself a Nazi, because Nazis never do. From the start “Nazi” was an insult. We all now face a choice in how to respond to this. We can either resist or collaborate. There are no other options. This is a decision we all face, but it is a particularly pertinent choice for the American people, and, crucially, the political establishment in America. Both Republican and Democrat politicians need to choose, are they going to resist or collaborate?

Make your choice now, before people start being rounded up and put in camps, before tanks roll out and bombs start falling. If enough people choose to resist now then the worst can still be avoided.

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#happysuhoday 🐰🎉 // one day one suho from the start of 2017 to may 22nd!
↳ Junmyeon said in 2016 he’d like to travel more in 2017 and share his trips and daily life with us, he kept his promise! He has travelled to the US, Mexico, Switzerland, Paris and many other countries all in less than 5 months, he also bought a camera just for his travels! There are still many countries to visit and selfies to take!

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So it turns out that a remarkably large amount of the US-Mexico border is defined by the Rio Grande. Like, Texas’s border with Mexico. 

The river doesn’t provide a meaningful barrier to migration: the Amazon it ain’t. But its existence poses a core problem for Trump’s wall that no one seems to mention: where do you put the border wall in relation to the river?

–you could put it on the US side, as we are legally entitled to do, but then the US effectively cedes the water to Mexico. I imagine farmers and ranchers across Texas might not be enthused by this option.

–we could put it in the middle of the river, on the actual border, and magically divide the water in half … if, you know, you wanted to build a wall in the middle of a river, and thought that hydrodynamics were the same as cutting a piece of cake.

–Trump could build it on the Mexican side of the river, take all the water, and commit an act of war by seizing Mexican territory … if the US didn’t mind being a pariah nation and potentially fighting an honest to god war on the southern boundary of Texas. Again.

This seems like something that ought to be worked out before we start building the wall. It’s not a detail to work out later.

On Jan. 25, President Trump signed an executive order instructing construction to begin on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Environmentalists and civil rights activists say the proposed wall on the southern border with Mexico is a threat to the environmental rights of the people who live on both sides of the border.

“When you have such beautiful wilderness areas as we have here in Arizona, the idea of putting this large wall that prevents the migration of animals, that scars the earth itself, and especially knowing how ineffectual it is, is something that is just sad,” said Juanita Molina, the executive director of Border Action Network, an organization that advocates for the health and wellness of people who live along the border. “The reality is that border communities are porous by nature.”

Molina, who lives in Benson, Ariz., said the wall could cause flooding and debris build-up on both sides of the border. (Chris Clarke of KCET has reported that a concrete wall “would cause catastrophic flooding in the desert.”) Molina also said there could be legal and ethical consequences if people try to build on the land of the Tohono O'odham Nation, whose reservation straddles the border, and whose leaders have spoken out for years against a border wall. But even if no part of the wall materializes, she said, the rhetoric around it has already caused rifts in her community.

The Environmental Consequences Of A Wall On The U.S.-Mexico Border

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge encompasses some of Alabama’s last remaining undisturbed coastal barrier habitat. The name Bon Secour is French for “safe harbor,” very appropriate considering the sanctuary it provides for native flora and fauna. This refuge is a natural oasis of wildlands, where wildlife can exist without harm. It may be too cold to go in the water, but even in winter, a walk on the beach can be a beautiful experience. Photo by Stephanie Pluscht, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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When you think of illegal immigration in the U.S., do you picture a border crosser or a visa overstayer? A family or a single person? A farmworker or a waiter?

People living in the U.S. without legal status are frequently invoked in American politics — especially in recent months. But the conversation is often short on facts about the millions of people who fall into this category.

There are, however, outdated beliefs: A Pew Research Center survey in 2015 found that very few Americans are aware of recent changes in immigration patterns.

And, of course, there are stereotypes, which often don’t always match up with reality. Most people in the U.S. illegally have been here for years, for instance, and people working service jobs far outnumber migrant farm labor.

Here’s a look at the actual statistics about people living in the U.S. illegally.

How America’s Idea Of Illegal Immigration Doesn’t Always Match Reality

Charts by Alyson Hurt

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Trump wants $1B to build a portion of the border wall that would barely span Rhode Island

  • President Donald Trump is set to ask for $1 billion to fund the first stage of his border wall, a chunk of change that will cover just 48 miles of new wall, CNN reported Tuesday.
  • The 48 new miles of border wall is a chunk so small it would just cover the length of Rhode Island — the smallest of the 50 states. Another chunk of the requested $1 billion is to repair 14 existing miles of border fencing. Read more. (3/28/17, 1:03PM)
EXO'rDIUM In México

1. Junmyeon said we were on their top 3 concerts.

2. They remembered the song “Sabor a mi” but they just performed a little verse because EXO-L start to sing along with them.

3. During Transformer the sound stop but we kept singing and they kept dancing. However they decide to start all over again saying that this has never happend to them before.

4. Junmyeon said we were crazy, but then he said EXO were crazy too.

5. They promised to return on their next tour.

6. They said to the upper zones that they look like little stars.

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Think about the avocados you mash for your Super Bowl guacamole, or the fresh tomatoes you enjoy in the winter. There’s a good chance they came from Mexico.

Our southern neighbor is the United States’ leading supplier of fresh produce, providing 70 percent of the fresh vegetables we import and more than 40 percent of our fresh fruit imports. That trade has boomed since NAFTA — the North American Free Trade Agreement — was signed in 1994.

President Trump’s repeated campaign threats to pull out of NAFTA and impose a tax on Mexican imports have caused jitters for Wholesum and other businesses on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Amid Talk Of Tariffs, What Happens To Companies That Straddle The Border?

Photos by Elissa Nadworny/NPR