us men's soccer team

Bill Hamid: Homegrown Hero

For DC area native Bill Hamid, playing for his hometown MLS club, D.C. United, is a dream come true. Here’s his story:

His love for the game started at a young age. His father, Sully Hamid, started Premier Athletics Club, which serviced youth teams in which Bill featured. Bill is top left, holding a trophy in the picture below.

Growing up, Bill often towered over his peers and those older than him. Here he is playing goalkeeper against kids two years his senior.

In addition to starring for youth clubs, Bill and his father regularly attended D.C. United games. From his spot in the stands, Bill saw a bright future for himself.

When Bill was 18, D.C. United signed him straight out of high school, making him their first Homegrown signing.

At 19-years-old, Bill broke Tim Howard’s record as the youngest goalkeeper in MLS history to make a start. 

Bill’s meteoric rise continued when, in 2011, he recorded his first USMNT start, a shutout to boot.

In 2013, Bill faced his biggest professional test to date - featuring for a D.C. United squad that recorded the worst season in MLS history. After such a rough campaign, Bill’s focus became reclaiming the pride of a city. 2014 became a remarkable year, both on the team and individual ends.

Now just 24-years-old, Bill’s future continues to look incredibly bright. What will come next? You’ll just have to keep tuning into MLS to find out :D

nytimes.com
United States Misses World Cup for First Time Since 1986
The stunning defeat to Trinidad and Tobago, combined with wins by Honduras and Panama, means the U.S. men’s team won’t be playing in Russia next summer.
By Andrew Das

Watch me continue to not care about the US men’s soccer team and instead lament about how the women’s deserve equal (if not higher tbh) pay and respect.

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It’s 2015. Women from each major political party are running for President. Combat jobs in the Army and Air Force are opening to women. But women still make $0.77 for every dollar men earn. In professional sports, the gender wage gap is even more profound. Female athletes receive a fraction of the prize money, pay, and media coverage men enjoy. Consider, for example, that the US Women’s soccer team was awarded $2M for winning the World Cup, while the Men’s team got $8M for being eliminated in the round of 16. Or that the average annual NBA salary in 2013-14 was $4.9M, compared with $72K in the WNBA. And until this year, the best female hockey players in the world couldn’t even get paid to play.

“Fine,” you say, “but people prefer men’s sports.” That could be because we barely hear about ladies who are making layups. Just 2% of sports news coverage focuses on female athletes.

Back this kickstarter to create a documentary about the the first and only professional women’s hockey league in North America to pay its players 

NWHL: History Begins

by Rachel Koteen/540 Films

14 MLS players named to the USMNT roster that will face Mexico.

Dos a Cero *clap clap clap clap clap*