us documentary

7

Happy Steven Moffat appreciation day!

‘Heroes are important. History books tell us who we used to be, documentaries tell us who we are now, but heroes tell us who we want to be and a lot of our heroes depress me. But you know when they made this particular hero (The Doctor), they didn’t give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver to fix things. And not a tank or warship or X-wing fighter. They gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And they didn’t give him a superpower or pointy ears or a heat ray. They gave him an extra heart. They give him two hearts and that’s an extraordinary thing because I don’t think there will ever be a time when we don’t need a hero like the Doctor.’

7

Today in Japan, it is March 31st and Shiota Kouhei’s (Tanaka Ryuunosuke)’s birthday~!!!

Happy 27th birthday, to Kouhei, Karasuno’s best senpai!!!  This will be his second year in a row celebrating his birthday while working on Haikyuu!  And this year, his birthday lands on the opening night of their Miyagi tour!!!

You can wish him a happy birthday on his Twitter (x) or his Instagram (x)!  
He’ll appreciate knowing he has western fans so feel free to leave a message in English, but if you’d like to say Happy Birthday in Japanese, just copy paste
お誕生日おめでとうございます!

Thank you everyone for helping me reach the 300 followers milestone! As a gift, I’d like to present you with some of my tips :)

Recently, I met a group of very motivational people, and they gave me tips on how I could manage my time better. I obviously took notes and thanked them so much because it definitely helped me out a lot.

Note: These tips won’t apply to all people as it is mostly focused on junior students (I’m a junior, so it might not be as helpful for the students in uni/college??)

It is a common thing for all students to have struggles with organising their time (especially me– why am I giving tips; wtf??), so I present to you: how to sort out your time!! 

What I’m going to cover:

  • Finding time to do work
  • How you can beat procrastination
  • Homework
  • Revision
  • Assignments + Exams

Be prepared, because this is an immense post. *Looks down* Yeah, it seems like I’m about to jump down a cliff made of tips. 

Keep reading

youtube

Born Rich is a 2003 documentary film (filmed primarily between 1999-2001) about the experience of growing up in wealthy families. It was created by Jamie Johnson, an heir to the Johnson & Johnson fortune. The film consists primarily of Johnson interviewing 10 other young heirs.

  This short documentary is enlightening, fascinating, and slightly horrifying; I can’t count the number of times I’ve watched it in the last few years and I figured it would be a good time to share. If this is what the wealth gap looked like more than a decade ago, you can imagine how the rich are living now that they have an even higher percentage of our money in their pockets. 

1943: Burgess explains how an English pub differs from American saloons. This educational documentary (which was narrated, written, and co-directed by Burgess) was made to introduce American soldiers to Britain during World War II. 

The only fan page solely dedicated to Burgess Meredith // Lovingly ran by his grandniece in attempt to keep his legacy alive.

a concept at an unholy hour:

Since Harry’s been away a lot lately because of all of the album and movie promo, you two haven’t had a chance to have some intimate time in quite a while.

And so when he tells you he’ll be going back home to you for a short break, you take it upon yourself to make this experience a fulfilling one. You go out and buy a nice new pair of lingerie. Nothing too fancy– just a simple baby pink bra with lace detailing at the brim, along with matching panties that are all lace across the back with a tiny bow at the waistband at the front.

And the second night after he’s back home (you wanted to give him the chance to sleep off all the jet lag), you find yourself in the bathroom, palms propped against the counter as you hype yourself up for the moment. Since it had been so long since Harry had seen you naked, saying you’re “shy” is the understatement of the year. And you can hear him calling for you from the bedroom, whining because he wants you to come cuddle him while he watches a The Story of Us documentary on ancient Egypt.

And so you wander into the bedroom meekly, standing before the bed in front of the TV to get his full attention, fiddling with your fingers as you stare up at him through your lashes.

Harry’s expression changes from once of slight annoyance (from being interrupted) to one of utter surprise. His eyes go all wide and his mouth parts as he ogles your chest under all the lace (the bra does a decent job in making them look plump) and raking his gaze down to the tiny diamond-detailed bow on your bottoms.

He looks frazzled with his hair in messy tuffs, all cozy in an old pair of sweatpants that have holes and an old Nickleback t-shirt and he just really wasn’t expecting anything like this. But he swallows thickly and just about bursts through his briefs when you reach up and tuck your hair behind your ear, smiling at him bashfully and, “D'ya like it?”

Harry’s crawling across the bed before you know it, nodding so hard his eyeballs rattle and he’s grabbing you by your wrist, pulling you into his lap and cupping your breasts over the soft material of the lingerie, kissing and sucking at the cleavage, voice strained and low between suckling pecks. “Fuck– yeah. Love it– s'much. Christ, you’re–a fucking– godsend.”

He leaves the bra on for show, laying you down on your back and tucking himself out of his sweats, moving your pantries to the side to allow him easy access and, “You’re really gonna fucking get it now, sweetheart. Gonna fuck you bloody raw.” He fucks into you hard and rough, full of jerky thrusts and lots of shoulder biting and fluttery kisses all around your face. He sits back on his heels, gliding into you with ease as he places a huge hand on your lower tummy while the other holds your thighs open. He’s rapidly thumbing over your clit, his two blocky front teeth digging a new shade of red into his lower lip as throaty whimpers force their way out of his mouth.

He pats his four other fingers against your abdomen as he hums a chuckle, a shit-eating grin twitching the corners of his lips. “Can feel me all the way in your tummy, can’t ya, pet? Nice and thick. Filling you all up, innit?”

Harry’s hair is flopping over his forehead and sweat pours down the sides of his neck as he bends down over your body, noses rubbing gently as he nibbles at your chin and licks at the corner of your mouth. “Tight little cunt gonna make me come. Naughty thing you are, waltzing in here with that lace and those big innocent eyes and those pretty lips. How could you not expect me to fuck the living daylights out of you?”

“That’s exactly what I expected.” You grin against his skin, nipping at his mouth tauntingly as he tuts in a warning tone.

“Careful, peach. You’re biting off more than you can chew.” He gives your clit a few sudden hard slaps, causing you to buck up against his thighs, to which he responds by shoving you back down with another hard slam of his hips. You can really feel him in your stomach now and the shattered moan you release is truly pitiful.

Harry licks his way down the valley of your chest, love bites marking the exposed skin as he rocks into you slow yet strong. His nails dig crescents into your thigh as he smolders up at you from under his furrowed eyebrows, quirking them challengingly when he sees you nod.

“You’d be surprised how much I can take. Been building up my stamina since you left.”

“Let’s put it to the test then.” He slips out of you suddenly, patting your lower hip as a signal for you to flip around. “Get on your tummy, ass up fo’ me. Atta girl, angel. Spread those pretty legs, will you? Be right back with my rings.”

4

Starfleet’s moral relativism problem: is it ever ok to condemn another culture?

Central to all of Star Trek has always been the Prime Directive – that set of rules that governs our intrepid space explorers from Captain Kirk to Captain Janeway and everyone in between. Poor Captain Archer existed in a time before, and I’ve often pitied him for having to shoulder the burden of having to make some really questionable ethical decisions without having a Prime Directive to shift the blame to when it turned out his decisions really sucked.

At its core, the Prime Directive dictates that Starfleet cannot interfere with the internal affairs or development of alien civilizations. Some of the best Star Trek episodes involved our heroes clashing with the ethics of a rigid application of this doctrine, but there was always one implication of the Prime Directive that bothered me – the idea that we shouldn’t judge other cultures through the lens of our own because who’s to say what’s right and what’s wrong?

This philosophy of moral relativism argues that there are no universal moral standards – sentient beings are completely at the mercy of their own societies to impart a code of moral behavior and whatever it comes up with is “good enough.” There may be common themes among many societies in terms of morals – most seem to agree it is wrong to commit murder, for instance – but ultimately, what is “right” according one society is not guaranteed to be “right” for another. And let’s be honest with ourselves – even with the topic of murder, we still fiercely debate exceptions to the “no murder” rule such as war, capital punishment, or self-defense.

Our own society provides an incredible patchwork of thorny moral and ethical issues that we still have yet to decide upon. We debate things like abortion, torture, slavery, free speech, and more. We probe these issues by asking ourselves questions like, “At what point does life truly begin?” and “Is torture ever justified?” We explore them by posing philosophical experiments like the Trolley Problem and asking ourselves whether it is morally acceptable to kill one person to save the lives of two or more others. 

How does that line go again? Something about “needs of the many” or something? 

But at the end of the day, might (in terms of numbers) makes right in moral relativism. While I don’t subscribe to that theory, there are times when our beloved Star Trek characters do under the guise of defending the Prime Directive. On the surface, it sounds very peaceful and anti-colonialist. After centuries of watching many empires from the Romans to the British set fire to cultural diversity – and given arguments that many Western nations continue to do this today, just without being quite as invadey – this sounds like a nice change of pace. Live and let live. But this also creates a mind-boggling acceptance of suffering, genocide, exploitation, and oppression within Starfleet.

One of the first chronological examples of the faults of moral relativism is found in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode, “Cogenitor.” Archer and his crew meet an affable, three-gendered species called the Vissians, but we quickly learn that only two of the society’s genders have any real rights. The third gender is referred to as a “cogenitor,” and Trip Tucker ends up on Captain Archer’s shit list for teaching it how to read and putting ideas in its head. When the cogenitor later begs for asylum, Archer refuses. It gets worse – the cogenitor is sent back to the people who basically treat it as chattel and commits suicide, and Archer points out that Tucker’s interference led to its death and will mean the Vissian couple will probably never get to have a child. No winners in this ethical dilemma of an episode, only losers. Until you remember none of this would have happened in the first place if the Vissians had just treated the cogenitors like people.

In the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, “Angel One,” we encounter the cringe worthy society of Angel I, a planet of misandric women who oppress men. We all got a few giggles at the ladies of Enterprise-D being suddenly held in higher regard than their male counterparts, but things get very dark when Beata, the Elected One of Angel I, decides some dudes need to die for spreading heretical teachings that imply men are equal to women. We get a sort of cop out solution in which Beata has a change of heart and decides to banish rather than execute these “heretics” after Riker makes an impassioned speech about basic rights, but Riker was more than willing to let things go bad if need be, because, “The Prime Directive” and “Just because I don’t like it doesn’t mean it’s wrong.”

The 80′s were a weird time. That outfit is a few inches of fabric away from having a codpiece.

In another Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, “Symbiosis,” we’re introduced to the Ornarans and Brekkians and we find out that after an ancient plague, the Brekkians started peddling an expensive and addictive drug to the Ornarans and calling it a “treatment.” There’s no plague anymore – the Brekkians just control the Ornarans through their drug addiction. Dr. Crusher finds a way to synthesize this drug and offers to help wean the Ornarans off their addiction, but what does Captain Picard do? He tells her to mind her own damn business because it’s not the Federation’s place to tell the Brekkians that it’s wrong to deceive and enslave the Ornarans through an addictive drug.

This episode also gave us one of the weirdest brawls in Star Trek history. Like a Reefer Madness for the 24th century, if you will. 

And this is the most uncomfortable part of moral relativism – who gets to draw the line and where do we draw it? On one end of the spectrum, we have moral relativism which claims anything goes – societies should be able to torture animals, employ the slave labor of children, and oppress women as they see fit – just as long as enough people agree it isn’t wrong to do so. At the other end of the spectrum sits moral absolutism, a theoretical construct that would result in a perfectly unified, homogenous culture, but one that would also strip away many facets of culture that lead to human diversity. 

If Star Trek is supposed to serve as a guide for how we might become a more progressive society, it does a terrible job a lot of the time. Now, there are many instances of our protagonists saying “to hell with the Prime Directive!” and taking what most of us would agree is the more morally praiseworthy route. But there’s no rhyme or reason to it. Just look at how they treat the Borg. Why is it ok to let some societies oppress men or drug another species into submission but it’s not ok to let the Borg assimilate the galaxy in their ultimate quest for perfection? 

I’m going to guess the answer is that until the Borg decided to stick nanoprobes in a Federation citizen, the cheerful little robots simply weren’t the Federation’s problem. We might argue that the Prime Directive certainly has provisions for self-defense - how ridiculous would it be to consent to being annihilated or assimilated just because the Federation is afraid of offending another culture and refuses to draw a line in the sand where right stops and wrong starts? The slope gets slippery here though. We could say this mirrors the concept of large Western nations trying to police the rest of the world and impose their customs on other societies - but how many of us watched documentaries about the Holocaust in school and wondered why the hell previous generations allowed shit to get that bad? How many of us continue to stand by while people in Iraq and Syria live under the threat of the Islamic State? I doubt most people even realize what’s going on in the Philippines or Venezuela right now because hey, “Not my country, not my problem.” It is a huge gray area for what constitutes forcing certain customs on unwilling societies and trying to genuinely help people, but if we can’t agree that Nazi extermination camps and religiously motivated beheadings are bad and need to stop (even when they aren’t happening to us personally), I’ll be surprised if we ever make to the 24th century. It makes me wonder how exactly Earth “solved its problems” and created a utopian society in the first place with this attitude of moral relativism.

Let’s face it – we have no shortage of modern travesties that sound ridiculous in the context of this philosophical approach. The Chechen Republic has been reportedly rounding up gay men and torturing them in recent months, and moral relativism would have us shrug and say, “But their culture says homosexuality is a sin.” 

To anyone who actually thinks that, fuck you. 

Bacha bazi, a practice where adolescent boys are groomed for sexual relationships with older men, remains pervasive in many Pashtun societies. Moral relativism would tell us that we shouldn’t condemn predatory pedophilia because to do so would mean unfairly imposing our Western beliefs on their culture. 

Just because one culture says widespread sexual coercion is ok doesn’t make it so. 

I could keep going on, but this post is already long enough. The bottom line is, all too often, Star Trek lazily glosses over a lot of moral and ethical dilemmas by using the argument, “Who are we to judge?” June is Pride Month, and in honor of LGBT individuals all over the globe who all too often have less rights than their cisgender heterosexual counterparts, maybe we should avoid looking to the “progressive” future of Star Trek and instead ask the question, “Who are we to not judge?” 

While I can’t resolve one of the greatest philosophical questions ever devised, someone once gave me a great piece of advice that I think applies to this idea of moral relativism: no person’s belief is inherently worthy of respect, but every person is. 

ritalinkin  asked:

why do you believe steven avery to be guilty? i very firmly think he's innocent!

From watching the documentary? Because it’s ridiculously bias. The documentary makers portray him to be something he’s not and downplay his disturbing past. For example, the part detailing what happened to the cat wasn’t accurate. It wasn’t a teenage mistake. He poured gasoline over a cat and threw it into a bonfire. Additionally, he allegedly raped his 17-year-old cousin and threatened to kill her family if she told anybody. She came forward after he was arrested but the case never went to trial because she was too afraid. A lot of evidence against him was also left out of the documentary.

For example, he specifically asked for Teresa to come to his house but did so pretending to be his sister and the reason he did this was because Teresa was scared of him. He opened the door to her naked previously and creeped her out so much that she said she would never return. It also didn’t acknowledge that he kept calling her on the day of her murder but withheld his number. After she was killed, he rang her again however this time he didn’t withhold his number, and it’s assumed because he knew she wouldn’t be answering, regardless of who was on the end of the line.

A number of her belongings were found burnt in his barrel and two witnesses at his trial testified seeing him putting things into the barrel. A number of barrels containing human remains were also discovered on his property. Ballistic evidence showed that the bullet containing Teresa’s DNA was fired from Avery’s rifle. Had the bullet been planted, how did it get her DNA on it and how could it have been shot from his gun when it was confiscated at the beginning of the investigation? Furthermore, in regards to the hole found in the blood sample that the documentary tries to pen as evidence of a framing, a nurse came forward straight away to confess that she had made the hole. They didn’t include that in the documentary, of course, because that didn’t fit with their theme. Another thing they didn’t mention was that sweat containing Avery’s DNA was discovered on the hood of her car and on her car keys.

In my opinion, they wanted a documentary that would sell and painted the case as something I don’t believe it to be and something the evidence doesn’t point towards it being. He wasn’t found guilty for nothing like the documentary leads us to believe. There is a profusion of corruption in the justice system and there were many legitimate cases they could have chosen to do a documentary on. They chose this case, in my opinion, so that idealistic viewers could transfer their shock and anger about the initial miscarriage of justice (and distrust of the police) to the murder case and use it as reasonable doubt.

Thought I would make this ask public if that’s okay with you because a couple of other people are asking why I believe him to be guilty!

ID #80856

Name: Elliot
Age: 20
Country: USA

Hiya! My name is Elliot and I love mangoes!

I’m not much of a interesting person but I can try to make a sale’s pitch about me… for example: i know about 10 facts about jellyfish, I watch documentaries about cryptids, I think zooming on people’s faces is the funniest thing in the world, and I live with about 5 dogs and 1 cat.

I’m going to college this year to study for Marine Biology and my backup plan was to either do animation or comics (not an avid drawer but I’m trying!). I know a lot about animals, sea animals are my favorite though, and I’m hoping to travel across the ocean. The comic book thing is still iffy since I mostly draw for fun since it gets difficult to try to draw everyday with such little motivation. I read lots of comic book though, one of my favorites being Morning Glories, Low, Lumberjanes, and Monstress (of course many more but oh my it would be too long).

I try to play video games from time to time, mostly on a PC since I find free games easier on there haha. I play a lot of RPG type of games, sometimes horror depending on what time it is. Been getting back into Legend of Zelda. Oh boy I downloaded a bunch of games online that I never got the chance to play yet… I keep procrastinating because wow so many things on the internet.

Hmm, I’m a bit of writer, just recently got back into it. I watch a lot of cartoons and TV shows. A few of my favorites has to be Avatar The Last Airbender, Teen Titans, and How To Get Away With Murder. Those are just the basics though! I read a lot too!! I love suggesting books to others and letting people borrow them!

I really want to get back into pen palling again since it’s so fun hearing about someone’s day and what things they like! I don’t have much friends here and I barely get time to really go out and about. It would be nice to explore the world from my own home

Preferences: I’m nonbinary so anyone who is not welcoming of LGBTQ+.

18-25 of any gender