up pgh

Gen 6: Introduces Mega Evolutions, a way for older pokemon to receive a possibly much needed power boost. About half of the pokemon with mega evolutions are (originally) from Kanto.

Gen 7: Introduces regional variants, a way for older pokemon to receive a possibly much needed power boost. All of the pokemon with regional variants are from Kanto.

Gen 8: Introduces Power Equipment, a way for older pokemon to receive a possibly much needed power boost. 99% of the pokemon with power equipment are from Kanto. (The 1% is just a new legendary that’s linked to Power Equipment.)

… etc etc

Gen 23: Introduces Death Laser 5000, a way for older pokemon to receive a possibly much needed power boost. All of the pokemon that can use Death Laser 5000 are from Kanto.

I picked one of these up at the Level Up Studios booth at Pgh Comicon and now I have a BLU Scout c:

These things are adorable! And has anyone taken a look at what is on the box? “Beware of back injury when lifting” (because the box is designed to look like a crate haha) and a “Do not feed” sign with Pyro? Pyro, what have you done?

I have always wanted to meet a patient with Down’s syndrome in Pedia. 

The boy had flat nasal bridge, slanted palpebral fissures, a flat back, small hands for his age and most notably- a delay in the skills a boy in his age must already have.

At 6 years old, he can only speak three words: mama, papa, and ayaw. These three words are the only words he used to verbally express his thoughts. When his words failed him, he relied on sound and body movements as expressions of his inner being.

What moved me was the grandmother who took care of him. I remember another patient we saw who had a similar condition. The other child was rather hostile, in sharp contrast to this well-behaved child we saw. 

The boy has his own share of stories. He got lost in Binondo for hours after being abducted by some unknown men and left him at another place. Good thing, there were some good souls who notified his lola. Thanks to the posters she printed and posted on the streets. Thankfully, this little boy loved taking pictures of himself so they were able to include photos of him in the posters.

I simply admire the grandmother for her time and effort. My hat’s off to her. 

The boy is a living reminder that people with developmental disorders can live normal lives, through rehab and by living in an environment who make these special people feel really special. As a reminder, there is always hope.  

Clerkship in 10 minutes

Day 1: My first duty at the OPD Minor OR. Just fixed some specimens after biopsy and sat the rest of the time. I thought my day was over. But in the afternoon, I was asked to see a patient at the OPD, a probable malignancy. In the evening, I saw another patient, this time at the wards, a case of oral cancer. 

Day 2: Happy independence day. Went home to QC, via a bus (dissuading my mom who wants to pick me up). Then, went back to Manila to unload stuff and then met some friends. Late evening, I saw a couple of classmates roaming around the hospital. Saw another patient, this time, a pedia patient with cleft lip palate. My day ended at around 11 PM. :)