unjust

Caps- Talks about how using his culture and religion for brownie points isn’t ok, the fact he gets ignored over these things as well and wants this to be acknowledged. Gets labeled as passive aggressive.

Crystal- States the unjust things happening since day one of them joining and the anti-blackness show not only to them but other muns as well. Gets labeled as passive aggressive and manipulative.

Dani- Speaks of the anti-blackness within the community and how it affects other black muns as well. Gets labeled as passive aggressive and angry black mun.

Might I add that this is coming from the same group of people. It makes you wonder how three people of color are being labeled as such after stating their concerns over something that affects them on the daily basis. Qwhite interesting if you ask me. Qwhite interesting indeed.

The funniest thing to me is that moment in a show when a character has just died in some tragic way, and it’s just like the saddest thing ever and everyone is bawling

Then you go backstage and they’re just sitting there scrolling through their phone because now they have nothing to do for the rest of Act 2

Its not like Mon El came to Earth, woke up and was like I am the Prince of Daxam. All Hail Me! Obey Me! Treat me like Royalty!
His first instinct was the go back home without hurting anyone. And then he was locked up at the DEO where Kara spewed hateful things about him (a lot of prejudice for a 11 year old), and didn’t pull the Prince card.

He lied because of the obvious prejudice that Kara HAD and STILL HAS, but also because he was ashamed for who he was and where he came from. 

There is a reason why he kept saying he was coward, and not a hero. Because he truly believed he didn’t deserve that mantle. And Kara was unfairly pushing him towards that role without truly asking what he wanted. And when he didn’t rise to occasion they were mad at him!? Alex was like, “I dont believe in you, my sister believes in you!” He didn’t ask to be hero, he didn’t want to be hero – he lost all his people, escaped in the most brutal circumstance, discovers he has these incredible powers, has survivors guilt, feels like a coward, has no home no job, has to adjust to a culture that is directly polar to his (and he is trying so hard to adjust!), and its been like a month? a month and a half? LIKE LET THE BOY FUCKING LIVE!

Clark had probably 20+ years to decided if he wanted to be hero. Kara had 10+ years and still chose NOT to be a hero. Clark believed Kara could be a hero, but never forced her and let her decide when the time was right for her to take the mantle. Kara believes in Mon, which is GREAT!, but Mon should be allowed to decide when he is ready, not by guilt tripping!!!

Like CHILL PEOPLE!, let him adjust to being on Earth before throwing a Cape on him! He has shed his Prince roots, but let him find himself on Earth, before making him a hero of Earth. 

“Remember that all people are weak and are unjust. Learn to forgive, not to be offended. It is better to move away from what is harming you - you cannot force love… Do not look for friends among people. Look for them in Heaven - among the saints. They will never leave or betray.”

~Staretz Nikolai Guryanov

(Icon, All Saints of Scotland, via Mull Monastery)

Injustice for Vietnam War Veterans

Recently, I learned something that I feel is incredibly unjust. 

As history teaches and many people in my hometown know, during the Vietnam War, Laos was decidedly neutral. However, the North Vietnamese forces were sneaking through Laos to conduct military strikes against South Vietnam. Clearly, Laotians didn’t like this happening because it meant possible danger, so they struck up a secret alliance with the U.S. CIA. The Hmong (the largest minority ethnic group in Laos) were a significant help and essential in the American fight. These soldiers rescued many American pilots, identified locations for American bomb strikes, fought Vietnamese communist forces, protected the jungle and mountain areas occupied by American forces, sabotaged Vietnamese supply lines, and gathered intelligence for the U.S. 

It is evident that without these Hmong soldiers, the loss of American soldiers would have been far greater. Laos suffered a casualty rate five times higher than the rate experienced by American soldiers. Hmong soldiers risked their very own lives for the lives of American soldiers. How honorable is that? Many American citizens had the Hmong to thank for being able to see their loved ones come home safely from the Vietnam War. 

Unfortunately, after the Americans abandoned Laos, communists gained control of the country. They destroyed and killed off so many villages. Only 75% of the Hmong in Laos survived the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Of these survivors, one-third of these people decided to do the dangerous in order to keep themselves safe. They fled to Thailand. I’ve heard stories of how parents had to drug their own babies in order to keep them from crying and revealing their location to the communists just to get across the boarder. The treks were awful.

As many people began to realize, Thailand refugee camps are no place to raise a family, so with the help of private American organizations, some Hmong families were flown to America to give them safety as a thank you for their remarkable role in the American fight. I’m going to say it again: these were private organizations. The U.S. government played no role in helping Hmong soldiers and their families at all after the Vietnam war despite any promises that may have been made. Is that really how we thank our allies?

I am a citizen of the United States of America. I happen to live in one of the few areas that has a high population of Hmong-Americans. It may seem insignificant when I tell you that my state’s population is 1% Hmong, but as for my city, it is so much greater. My graduating high school class was 19.5% Hmong-American. I know people who have incredible family stories: their grandparents were born in Laos and fought for the Americans then fled to Thailand, their parents were born in Thailand then moved to America, and they themselves were born in America and are beginning to start their own families.

What I found to be shocking and unjust recently was that even though these Hmong people who are Vietnam War veterans that had fought for the U.S., risked their lives for American citizens, and are now U.S. veterans, they are not considered Vietnam War veterans by our American government, and therefore, they receive no benefits. This may seem like a tedious problem to the majority of America, but to me, and to my city, it is an outraging problem and we wish to thank them and for the United States Government to treat them as the heroes they are. These are beautiful, brave people who continue to inspire me everyday.

Qaasim al-Joo’ee said:

“I advise you with five matters:

1. When you are treated unjustly, do not behave unjustly.
2. when you are praised do not become happy.
3. when you are criticised, do not become upset.
4. when you are not believed, do not become angry.
5. If the people act deceitfully towards you, do not act deceitfully towards them.”

—  Related by Ibn al-Jawzee in Sifatus-Safwaa, 2/200.

anonymous asked:

Not all Muslims, not all blacks, but yes all cops? Or am I looking at your post from a wrong angle. I'm in no way "pro-police" and think the police force is nothing more than a bunch of pawns used by capitalists pigs in their hideous game of Chess, but I do also know that if someone shot my uncle and said he was a machine used by the state to kill black people, I would be absolutely disgusted by them, because he's definitely far from that.

Saying not all Muslims and not all “Blacks” (FFS) is not the same thing at ALL. Policing is a JOB. A job where every police office agrees to enforce the laws, no matter how unjust, violent, and evil they are. You acknowledge this yourself in your ask, cops choose to participate in a system that perpetuates injustice. 

Just look at the way that police LEGALLY worked ON ORDERS to break up the Standing Rock protest and prayer camp. An extremely militarized police department used tear gas, armored vehicles, rubber bullets, flash grenades, sound cannons, pepper spray, water cannons, batons, etc. against these unarmed people. They acted on the requirements of their job to perpetuate anti-Native violence and racism. 

Another example would be anti-homeless laws that some states have. There are laws in place to keep the homeless off the street, hell my state has tried to pass laws to make it illegal to feed the homeless. And who enforces these inhumane laws? Who is arresting the homeless and putting them in a system that places fines on these people? Then who is arresting them again for not paying these bullshit fines and keeping them in the system cycle? 

Your totally nice family member who is a cop is a part of this system. Every cop is a part of this system. It’s. Their. Job.

Translation:

I ask you in the name of god who made you beautiful ..

Love me .. Even when i am unjust ..

Love me .. My flaws and lies ..

Love me .. And my bitterness ..

When I was 10, I went to SeaWorld. I loved everything about it. So beautiful and magical. And the animals were phenomenal. But one animal in particular caught my attention .. Tilikum. The giant who splashed everyone. I loved him. And a certain trainer who asked me if I had any questions but I was too shy to respond. She was so nice and considerate. She said her name was Dawn and she’d hope to see me there again soon. They both held a very special place in my heart after I returned home.

A mere two months after the trip, I heard on the TV that there was a accident in the SeaWorld I visited. And when I heard the names “Tilikum” and “Dawn” .. I was heartbroken. February 24th, 2010. Tilikum pulled Dawn down by the hair or the leg, depending on which story you believe, down to the bottom of the tank and drowned her. My role model was killed by the very animal I wanted to work with when I grew up. I was distraught.

6 years later, I’m a 17 year old animal rights activist. Who openly detests captivity and fights for all animals freedom. But I admit, I hold one animal at a higher regard than the others .. Tilikum. The 32 year old giant still lives in SawWorld. After killing 3 people in his lifetime. They haven’t once considered the possibility that he’s too mentally unstable to work with anymore and refuse to put him in a seaside rehabilitation center because he is the best breeder and the most successful Orca in captivity. Everyone wants to see the poor murderer. My goal in life is to contribute my heart and soul into the release of Tilikum from his concrete prison. And to keep Dawn Bradcheau’s name alive.

The reason I posted this is to spread awareness. Dawn’s death didn’t deserve to be lied about by the very company who was supposed to protect her and keep her alive in the first place. And Tilikum wasn’t supposed to be captured at the age of 2, watch his mother die, and be shipped from cage to cage to preform for scraps. All of it is sick and twisted. Agree with me or not. It’s sick.