university of california santa barbara

Southern California Gothic
  • "It will rain." they say. They say that every day. And every day, you wait. How long have you waited? You don't know anymore.
  • You stop at a dusty intersection. At all corners, there are people with fruit stands. The cherries are 2 dollars a pound. You see the sign saying no stands. You look to the police. They have one too. The strawberries are a dollar a basket.
  • You're walking in LA along Hollywood Boulevard. You walk along the stars. It feels like forever. So many and yet so many still. You eventually find your own name on one for film. You have never been in a movie. Or so you think.
  • "Let's go to In-N-Out," says your friend. Which one? There are no other burger places around. There is only In-N-Out. There is always only In-N-Out.
  • You walk past a person in a Dodgers hat. Not uncommon. Everyone owns one. Everyone you walk past wears one. You reach up onto your head. You are one of them.
  • You go to a restaurant with a friend. Everything is gluten free. You don't mind. Everything is. What even is gluten? You don't know, but you are horrified by it.
  • The beach is nice in the summer. The beach is nice in spring. The beach is nice. The beach is your friend, your overlord. You must respect it. Bow to it before stepping on its sandy shores.
  • You get onto the 405. Siri says you only go 5 miles before getting off on the exit ramp. It has been decades since she said that last. Your hands are old and wrinkled as they grip the wheel. Siri says you have 4 miles to go. It's faster than usual.
  • You park your car on the side of the road and get out. The beach. You look at the top of your car to find a surfboard. You don't own a surfboard. You do now and have accepted it as your new way of life. You go to put on your wetsuit.
  • Your friend says she has tickets to the next concert. You ask where. She laughs. It is everywhere. The Bowl. The Forum. Staples Center. It is everywhere at once. All concerts are.
  • You debate on where to go for summer vacation. The fight ensues. Magic Mountain, Knott's Berry Farm, Universal Studios, and Disneyland. They fight for your affection and your money for when summer comes. This happens every year.
  • The palm tree outside your window waves at you in the wind. The palm trees are your ever present, looming protector. They are always watching.
  • You hear the chiming of the elotero's cart. You grab your money and run out the door. There is no elotero. The bell still rings. It always rings.
3

Sweet Nature Study Spot #2 🌱📓
Location: Caje (~5 minute walk from home)
Overall Rating: 3.5/5

Pros✅:
- Aesthetically pleasing and laid back atmosphere
- This has basically morphed into a study exclusive spot
- Has a nice menu with coffee, aćai bowls, and more!
- Indoor and outdoor seating
- Free wifi

Cons❌:
- Doesn’t have a bathroom! (This is a HUGE one and the only reason this place wasn’t ranked higher. But I got to go on a nice little adventure while looking for one :3 )
- Can be loud inside because of blenders and such (but this can be fixed with a pair of headphones.)
- Gets crowded pretty easily and indoor seating typically fills up first
- Can feel pressure to buy something because it’s kind of awkward if you study there but don’t buy anything

Overall: I liked this place and definitely plan on studying here on the mornings when I don’t have class.

🌱Nature Approved🌱

Homes: Schindler House
External image

External image

External image

External image

External image

External image

External image

External image

External image

Schindler House


The L.A. designer Pamela Shamshiri recently brought her own historic R. M. Schindler house back to its original glory.

The architect, the most bohemian of Frank Lloyd Wright’s acolytes, known for his cresting wave of dark hair and poet’s white middy blouse, built the place for a client named Richard Lechner and his wife in 1947. The house — at 3,500 square feet one of Schindler’s largest — hugs the land’s contours like a giant V, the angle nestled into rock. With long treetop views through walls of glass, seemingly endless sources of natural light from clerestory windows and a warm, human scale emphasized by humble plywood interiors, it is a classic example of the architect’s postwar “space” oeuvre, an Expressionist cliff dwelling for the modern era.

Pamela Shamshiri knew the house would complicate her life, almost unbearably, when the realtor first took her there in 2008. She was raising two children and was buried in projects for Commune, the design firm behind the Ace Hotels in Palm Springs and L.A., as well as boutiques for Irene Neuwirth and Opening Ceremony. As a result of her work with that in-­demand collective (co-founded by Shamshiri and her brother, Ramin, along with Roman Alonso and Steven Johanknecht), she was well positioned to understand the challenges inherent in bringing the house back to its original glory.

Lechner eventually lost the place in a divorce in the ’50s, and eight owners later, it had gone from majestic to mundane, a fate common to many works by Schindler, as well as his two great Los Angeles-based midcentury peers — fellow Viennese émigré Richard Neutra and John Lautner. The walls and the bold, angular, stainless-steel fireplace were covered in Sheetrock (the brick columns that flanked the hearth had been sheathed in black granite), and Schindler’s purposefully plain, hardware-free windows had been replaced with big-box-store-grade metal ones. The architect’s understated mirror-top bar and built-in pullout table were gone from the great room, and there were incongruously cheery mosaic tiles in the kitchen. Some of the outdoor spaces on the two levels had been enclosed — not necessarily a bad idea, but the work had been done shabbily. “It was heartbreaking,” Shamshiri says. “The spirit was gone.”

And yet, it haunted her. At the time, ­Shamshiri and her then-husband were living in another significant structure, a radically deconstructed ’80s Frank Gehry in Venice Beach. But the idea of “saving something that was really worth it, that you know means something to history,” was too tempting to resist.

Eight years later, the house is not merely a Schindler brought back from the near-dead, but a reflection of Shamshiri’s own unique ­aesthetic, streamlined late-20th-century California cool studded with primitive, organic touches and high-low wit, showcased now in her work with Studio Shamshiri, co-­founded with Ramin this year. The renovation also represents an ongoing dialectic with Schindler, whose unconventionality and purity of vision are inescapable in Southern California, not only in his houses for clients, but in the Kings Road house. Now a museum in West Hollywood, it was originally built in 1922 as a studio-cum-commune for himself, his wife, Pauline, and another couple. (Neutra and his wife lived there with the Schindlers for a time, until they had a falling out.)

For Shamshiri, the key to turning the Lechner house into a contemporary residence was to avoid slavish devotion to Schindler’s original design, while reconstructing his most brilliant touches. She had a few things going for her. Schindler had acted as contractor as well as architect, and all of the plans and details, along with black-and-white photographs, were meticulously archived at the University of California Santa Barbara. Once the Sheetrock was removed, Shamshiri found the original plywood, with Schindler’s own numbers scrawled in pencil in the corners. She replaced the metal windows that so violated the home’s ethos; many of them now push out simply, with minimal hardware, as the architect intended.

From there, Shamshiri strove to improve on the original. To make the flow more organic, and because food culture is now such a part of California living, she broke through the far end of the galley kitchen to connect it to the den behind, adding a Paul McCobb wine rack that looks as though it has always been there. The changes aren’t major, but they’re symbolically significant, proving that the work of great Modernist architects can be made contemporary without diluting their éclat.

Having come from a close, globe-trotting clan — her Iranian father and Roman mother split their time between Iran and Italy — Shamshiri regards family life as a cacophonous work in progress; she had no intention of living in a museum. “I would often say to myself, What would Schindler do if he were alive?” she says. “He updated houses all the time. He didn’t think it was set in stone.”

Source: The New York times Style Magazine

anonymous asked:

I'm not sure how to say something like this but I think there's only two genders, but if you wanna be non-binary, a gender, gender fluid I'm not gonna say it's wrong or stop you, like my opinion doesn't matter for anyone and they should do what they want and even though I think there's only two, I'd still support someone who's puzzled about having more than one gender, I know humans should be doing that anyway but I felt like saying this idk???

Look, pal. I hate to break this to you but if you’re going to a nonbinary blog and saying “i don’t believe that you are telling the truth about your lived experience” then that makes you a rude person. Nonbinary people exist and we are not making it up just like gay people aren’t pretending to be gay, or binary trans people aren’t pretending to be trans. 

Additionally, many ancient cultures condoned, encouraged, and even admired gender transcendence. Examples of this can be found in many cultures, both historically and fictionally. There are ancient Roman figures who transcend binary gender, namely Tiresias, Hermaphroditus, and Caeneus. Pre-colonial Native American tribes knew there were more than two genders and were known to highly respect people who neither men nor women. Ancient Mesoamerican deities do not ascribe to the concept of gender in the same way humans do, leading modern analysts to think that they would have supported and admired those who also did not ascribe to gender in a traditional way. Additionally, Jewish tradition says there are six genders. Nonbinary genders are as old as humanity itself. 

Sources: 

If you still think there is no such thing as nonbinary genders, then you should probably do some research. It’s out there. Don’t live in ignorance. 

I reiterate: going to a nonbinary blog to say “I feel like you are lying and nonbinary genders are fake” is a pretty rude thing to do. Find what makes you happy and do that. Get a life, seriously. 

3

On 23 May, 2014, 22-year-old Elliot Rodger went on a murder spree near the campus of University of California in Santa Barbara, killing six people and injuring another thirteen before committing suicide. The spree began with the stabbing of three men in his apartment, two of whom were his roomates. He then drove to Alpha Phi, a nearby sorority house, and shot three female students standing outside. One managed to survive but the other two died from their wounds. From the sorority house, Elliot drove to a local deli and began shooting, killing one male student. He then drove off while shooting pedestrians from his car and striking several others with his car. The killing spree finally came to an end when Elliot crashed his car into a parked vehicle. He then shot himself in the head. Before Elliot began this brutal killing spree, he had uploaded a video to YouTube which he had titled “Elliot Rodger’s Retribution”. In this disturbing video, he revealed his motivation for his attack. He described his desire to punish women for rejecting him. He also blamed other men who were successful with women and therefore living a more enjoyable life than him. After uploading this video, Elliot emailed a manifesto to friends and family members which he had titled “My Twisted World” and similar to his video, it described his motivation for the attack.

Historians have finally revealed the identity of the man in the iron mask

History professor Paul Sonnino at the University of California, Santa Barbara, says he’s solved the centuries-old mystery of the Man in the Iron Mask. In Search for the Man in the Iron Mask: A Historical Detective Story, published in January, Sonnino details decades of research into the enigma of the French prisoner who was jailed from 1669 until his death in 1703, during which he concealed his identity with a mask. Sonnino argues the prisoner had been the valet of a very rich, very corrupt Cardinal — and knew one too many secrets.

Follow @the-future-now

‘I will slaughter every single blonde slut I see’

A gunman went on a drive-by shooting rampage in a Santa Barbara student enclave and at least seven people were killed, including the attacker, authorities said.
Investigators believe a 22-year-old named Elliot Rodger driving a black BMW acted alone in the shootings around 9:30pm Friday night near the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown confirmed at a news conference early Saturday that that seven people were killed, including the gunman, and seven wounded.

Elliot Rodger, on his social media accounts unleashed a tirade about his ‘loneliness, rejection, and unfulfilled desires,’ and blames women for preferring ‘obnoxious brutes’ to him, ‘the supreme gentlemen.’

'I’m 22 years old and I’m still a virgin. I’ve never even kissed a girl,’ he says in the video.
‘College is the time when everyone experiences those things such as sex and fun and pleasure. But in those years I’ve had to rot in loneliness. It’s not fair. You girls have never been attracted to me. I don’t know why you girls aren’t attracted to me. But I will punish you all for it,’ he says in the video, which runs to almost seven minutes.
He repeatedly promises to ‘punish’ women and lays out his plan for ‘retribution.’

'I’m going to enter the hottest sorority house of UCSB and I will slaughter every single spoilt, stuck-up, blonde s**t that I see inside there. All those girls that I’ve desired so much, they would’ve all rejected me and looked down on me as an inferior man if I ever made a sexual advance towards them,’ he says.
‘I’ll take great pleasure in slaughtering all of you. You will finally see that I am, in truth, the superior one. The true alpha male,’ he laughs like a maniacal movie villain. ‘Yes… After I have annihilated every single girl in the sorority house I will take to the streets of Isla Vista and slay every single person I see there. All those popular kids who live such lives of hedonistic pleasure…’

Rodger’s Twitter account has only two tweets, posted on April 19 and 20.
‘Why are girls sexually attracted to obnoxious, brutish men instead of sophisticated gentlemen such as myself? #girls #perverted #sex #unfair,’ reads the first.

—  The shooting was an act of misogyny. The worst result of male entitlement.

The brief friendship of Malcolm X and Yuri Kochiyama began close to 50 years ago with a handshake.

Diane Fujino, chairwoman of the Asian-American studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, details the moment in her biography Heartbeat of Struggle: The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama.

Kochiyama and her eldest son, 16-year-old Billy, were arrested along with hundreds of other people, mainly African-Americans, during a protest in Brooklyn, N.Y., in October 1963.

“[They were] in this packed courthouse,” Fujino says. “[There were] a lot of activists who [were] waiting their hearing on the civil disobedience charges.”

In walks Malcolm X, who was quickly mobbed by adoring activists.

Kochiyama described the scene in a Democracy Now! interview in 2008. “I felt so bad that I wasn’t black, that this should be just a black thing,” she recalled. “But the more I see them all so happily shaking his hands and Malcolm so happy, I said, ‘Gosh, darn it! I’m going to try to meet him somehow.’ ”

Not Just A 'Black Thing’: An Asian-American’s Bond With Malcolm X

Photo: Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center

Editor’s note: Today would have been Yuri Kochiyama’s birthday. She died of natural causes on June 1, 2014.

Ocean Life Faces Mass Extinction, Broad Study Says

A team of scientists, in a groundbreaking analysis of data from hundreds of sources, has concluded that humans are on the verge of causing unprecedented damage to the oceans and the animals living in them.

“We may be sitting on a precipice of a major extinction event,” said Douglas J. McCauley, an ecologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an author of the new research, which was published on Thursday in the journal Science.

But there is still time to avert catastrophe, Dr. McCauley and his colleagues also found. Compared with the continents, the oceans are mostly intact, still wild enough to bounce back to ecological health.

“We’re lucky in many ways,” said Malin L. Pinsky, a marine biologist at Rutgers University and another author of the new report. “The impacts are accelerating, but they’re not so bad we can’t reverse them.”

Manatee photo by U.S. Bureau of Land Management.