united states service

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Federal immigration agent looking for fourth-grader at NYC school blocked from entering

  • An officer from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services was denied entry Thursday to an elementary school in Queens, New York, when they arrived looking for a fourth-grade student, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office reported.
  • A school safety agent and administrator turned the agent away when they arrived at Public School 58 without a warrant, Gothamist reported.
  •  Mayoral spokesman Eric Phillips tweeted that the agent left when school officials failed to provide assistance, and that it was unclear why the agent was trying to locate the student. Read more (5/15/17)

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Now, more than ever before, the people are responsible for the character of their Congress. If that body be ignorant, reckless, and corrupt, it is because the people tolerate ignorance, recklessness, and corruption. If it be intelligent, brave, and pure, it is because the people demand these high qualities to represent them in the national legislature. If the next centennial does not find us a great nation…it will be because those who represent the enterprise, the culture, and the morality of the nation do not aid in controlling the political forces.
— 

Congressman James Garfield of Ohio, remarks on the 100th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1876. 

Garfield’s comments can and should be applied to the White House, as well, and have never been more fitting. When you’re seeking the source to blame for the sorry state of our political culture, our broken system of government, and the “public servants” who make the decisions that impact our lives, remember that it is our fellow Americans who elected these people to represent us. Elections have consequences.  

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Happy Independence Day! On June 30, 2017, we were honored to host our fourth annual Independence Day naturalization ceremony with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. On this day, 196 immigrants from 56 countries became U.S. citizens at The New York Public Library. Many used the Library’s free classes and services throughout the application process - find out more about our Citizenship Resources here.

I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time – when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.
—  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

The following is a list of people who killed and the jobs they had prior to their capture:

Jeffrey Dahmer- army combat medic, mixer at the Ambrosia Chocolate Factory

John Wayne Gacy- shoe store manager, KFC manager, children’s birthday party clown

Ted Bundy- grocery store bagger and stocker, shoe clerk, bus boy, campaign volunteer, suicide hotline worker

David Berkowitz- letter sorter for the United States Postal Service, army veteran

Dennis Nilsen- British army cook, police officer in London

Dean Corll- vice president of a candy factory

Andrei Chikatilo- literature teacher, regional sports manager

Harold Shipman- doctor

Dennis Rader- ADT alarm installer 

Donald Harvey- worked various jobs in the medical field

Fred West- ice cream truck driver

Robert Pickton- pig farmer

Miyuki Ishikawa- midwife

Cary Stayner- motel handyman

Jack Unterweger- author, radio host, journalist

Karl Denke- church organ player

Peter Sutcliffe- factory worker, grave digger, truck driver

Norman Afzal Simons- grade school teacher

Richard Angelo- nurse

Randy Steven Kraft- bartender, forklift driver

Arthur Shawcross- Watertown Public Works Department employee

Doug Clark- mechanic, boiler operator

Daniela Poggiali- nurse

Michael Swango- physician, laboratory technician

Thomas Neil Cream- physician, surgeon

Arnfinn Nesset- nurse, nursing home manager

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev- lifeguard, marijuana dealer

Dylann Roof- landscaper

Some Things Your Local Librarians Would Like You To Know

It is not a stupid question. Even if it is a stupid question, we have been thoroughly trained to answer your question without judgement or second-guessing. Besides, we’re mostly just glad you’re not asking us about the noise the printer is making again.

There are probably (at least) two desks in the library. One is where you check out books and is mostly staffed by people wearing nametags that say “Circulation Clerk.” These people can answer your questions about damaged or missing books, fines, and how many forms of identification we’ll need if you want to get a library card but your mailing address is in Taiwan. The other one is closer to the books and computers and is mostly staffed by people wearing nametags that say “Librarian.” These people can answer your questions about spider extermination, how to rent property to the United States Postal Service, and the number of tropical island nations in which you could theoretically establish the first United States Embassy. We would love to answer these questions for you. It would be a nice change from the printer.

We probably own a 3D printer by now. 3D printers, are cool, right? Please, please come use our 3D printer, it’s so lonely.

We spent a lot of money to hire this woodworker to come and teach a class at the library which you can attend for free. You will probably be the only person between the ages of ten and fifty in attendance, but your presence will fill the librarian with an unnameable joy. They will float back to their manager in a daze. “A young person came to my program,” they will say. You will have made their entire job worthwhile.

Every time you ask us for a book, movie, or music recommendation, a baby librarian gets their first cardigan.

Somewhere in the library, there is a form. If you fill out this form with your name and library card number and the details of the thing you are looking for, we will find you the thing. Sometimes the answer is “the thing is in Great Britain and they will not send it to us,” but more often the thing will just appear on hold for you, and one day you will pick up a copy of that out-of-print book you never thought you would read and maybe you will say, “Wow, the library is amazing,” and the librarian’s heart will glow. 

Please bring back book #2. The rest of its series misses it very much.

Five dollars is not a large library fine. Believe me, before I started working in libraries, I too wondered how someone could sleep at night, knowing they owed money to the library. When we laugh as you sheepishly apologize for your $2.50 in overdue fees, we are not mocking you, we are thinking of the ten people we sent to debt collection already today.

We really don’t care why you’re checking out Fifty Shades of Grey. Maybe you have a specifically-themed ironic bachelorette party to plan. Maybe you’re working on a thesis paper about mainstream media’s depiction of female sexuality. Maybe you just got curious. We will give you the benefit of the doubt. 

Whatever you’re smoking in the family restroom, please stop.

Somewhere on the library’s website, buried under “Links” or “Research” or “On-line Resources,” is a page that a librarian spent a month’s worth of work on. It contains many links to websites you thought everyone knew about, and one to a page that you could never have imagined existed that perfectly solves a problem you never expected to be resolved. 

Imagine the kind of person who would think to themselves, “Library school sounds like a thing I should do.” For the most part, you are imagining the kind of person who is now a librarian. We want very much to help you, but we’re not entirely sure how to do that unless you ask. You are not bothering us. Please, come and say hi.

Whatever you're going through, you don't have to go through it alone.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a United States based service available 24/7/365. You do not have to be thinking about suicide to call. The Lifeline supports anyone struggling emotionally. If you need someone to talk to, reach out: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also chat with a counselor online

Your life matters to us. ❤️

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Dear Lord, before we eat this meal, we ask forgiveness for our sins, especially Boyd, who blew up a black church with a rocket launcher, and afterwards, he shot his associate, Jared Hale, in the back of the head out on Tates Creek Bridge.

Let the image of Jared’s brain matter on that windshield not dampen our appetites, but may the knowledge of Boyds past sins help guide these men. May this food provide them with all the nourishment they need.

But if it does not, may they find comfort in knowing that the United States marshals service is offering $50,000 to any individual providing information that’ll put Boyd back in prison.

Cash or check. We can make it out to them or… to Jesus… whoever they want. In Your name, we pray. Amen.

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Revere, Missouri
Population: 79

“Founded on October 22, 1887 by the Santa Fe Railroad, Revere was ‘probably named in honor of Paul Revere.’ During the period prior to 1900, Revere flourished as an intermediate stop for the railroad.

Revere was a town into the 2000s, but it became a village after a change in state law: a 2009 law provided for the conversion of all towns with fewer than five hundred residents into villages. On July 26, 2011 the United States Postal Service announced plans to consider closing the Revere post office as part of a nationwide restructuring plan. On May 9, 2012 it was announced that a new strategy would preserve the nation’s smallest post offices, reversing the earlier plan.”

Warrior Wednesday: 12 years ago on this day (06.28.05), Lt. Michael P. Murphy valiantly gave his life in order to try to save the lives of his fellow SEALs. His actions and sacrifice that day would lead him to posthumously receiving the Medal of Honor. Below is the citation describing his selfless act of heroism that fateful day. 

MEDAL OF HONOR CITATION:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005. While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy’s team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers, who revealed their position to Taliban fighters. As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men. When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team. In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

New Consultant

Hey! My name is Soren, and I’m currently 20 years old. I’m Transgender(ftm), asexual, pan romantic, and in a loving relationship with my boyfriend, who is also trans. My pronouns are he/him/his and I’m also a Hufflepuff, Therian, Neo-pagan, college student (junior), and a punk. I’m disabled by Generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, PTSD, panic disorder, hypomutism, asthma, eczema and self-diagnosed autism. I’m very open about my life and love to educate individuals where I can. I would like to pursue an official diagnosis for autism, however I am in a situation that prevents that. I’ve been researching service dogs extensively (my special interest) for the last 4 years, as well as dogs and dog training in general. On top of that, I’ve also been working on my own to get a potential service dog for myself. I currently have high hopes for a golden retriever puppy in the following year, and will be owner training where I can. I asked to become a consultant for this blog when I noticed a service dog question that went unanswered. While I am constantly learning, I’d love to share the info and knowledge that I have regarding service dogs within the United states with any who are interested in the topic that stumble upon this blog. I promise to do my best in answering any of your questions and, should I be unable to do so, I will do the research necessary. I look forward to working with you all! [Gif shows an illustration of a German Shepherd wearing a blue and black vest that has a black patch saying service dog and a red and white circle patch saying stop. The background is pink with blue lettering that says “I’m cute, but I’m working!” The word working is underlined. ]

Originally posted by draikinator

A 20-cent commemorative stamp honoring American author Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was issued August 1, 1984, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, the setting for his novel Moby Dick.

The stamp was designed by Bradbury Thompson of Riverside, Connecticut, and modeled by Frank J. Waslick, based upon the portrait by J. O. Easton.