united states border patrol

anonymous asked:

Historical spotlight: Emma Tenayuca (December 21, 1916 – July 23, 1999) was a Mexican American labor leader & union organizer. She is best known for her work organizing Mexican workers in Texas during the 1930s, particularly for leading the 1938 Southern Pecan Shelling Company worker's strike. She was highly involved in both the Worker’s Alliance of America and Woman’s League for Peace and Freedom & organized a protest over the beating of Mexican migrants by United States Border Patrol agents.

Thanks for this Nonny!

mod m

‘Cartel’ Author Spins An Epic Tale Of Mexico’s Sadistic Drug Wars

Don Winslow, author of The Cartel, on how America’s drug problem relates to Mexico’s drug problem:

“We are the largest drug market in the world. We’re five percent of the world’s population — we consume 25 percent of the world’s illegal drugs. Mexico has the misfortune to share a 2,000 mile border with the largest drug market in the world. … At the end of the day, they’ll run out of products. It’s the illegality that makes those territories so valuable. If you criminalize anything only criminals can sell it. If only criminals can sell it, there’s no recourse to law, there’s only recourse to violence. That’s created the cartels. It’s our simultaneous appetite for — and prohibition of — drugs that makes those border territories worth killing for.”

Credit Source: United States Border Patrol

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Mass Graves of Immigrants Found in Texas, But State Says No Laws Were Broken

Texas says there is “no evidence” of wrongdoing after mass graves filled with bodies of immigrants were found miles inland from the U.S.-Mexico border. The bodies were gathered from the desert surrounding a checkpoint in Falfurrias, Texas, in Brooks County. An investigation was launched after the mass graves were exposed last November in a documentary by The Weather Channel in partnership with Telemundo and The Investigative Fund. The report also found many of the migrants died after crossing into the United States and waiting hours for Border Patrol to respond to their 911 calls. We speak with reporter John Carlos Frey, who found rampant violations of the law.

Jose Antonio Vargas, who has chronicled in minute detail the twists and turns of his life as a Filipino living illegally for years in the United States, was detained by the Border Patrol for most of the day on Tuesday and then released with a notice to appear before an immigration judge.

The detention of Mr. Vargas, probably the most high-profile leader of the immigrant rights movement, posed an awkward dilemma for the Obama administration. The surge of Central Americans, including many children, crossing the border illegally — saying they are fleeing criminal violence at home — has made all decisions about immigration politically fraught, and administration officials were keenly aware that the backdrop to their decision to release Mr. Vargas was a border where thousands of migrants are being held.

Mr. Vargas was detained at a Border Patrol checkpoint in the airport of this city in the Rio Grande Valley before he was to board a flight to Houston, on his way to Los Angeles. In a terse statement, Department of Homeland Security officials said they had released Mr. Vargas because he had no prior immigration or criminal record. They said their focus was on deporting immigrants who posed security threats.

It was the first time Mr. Vargas, who has been living without papers in the United States since 1993, had been arrested by immigration authorities. Lawyers assisting him said that they would seek to have the action against him suspended, and that it was unlikely he would be deported.

Mr. Vargas insisted that he never intended to be detained when he came to South Texas. But he and his supporters wasted no time turning his arrest into a day of high drama, using it to publicize their cause on social media and at a news conference in front of the Border Patrol station where he was held.

“I was released today because I am a low priority and not considered a threat,” Mr. Vargas said by telephone shortly after his release. “I would argue that the 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country are not a threat either.”

I’ve been leading the fight in the senate to triple our border control, create funds for walls, armed patrols and bio metrics.
—  Ted Cruz before being cut off (even though the United States spent $18 Billion on border patrol in 2014). We need rational immigration policy that helps lift people up, not one which wastes money forcing them out. Bernie Sanders 2016!