united state's army

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Hell in My Hands

“Today I was able to hold and photograph something that absolutely stopped me in my tracks. One person I shared this with said "you had hell in your hands” He was right. I hope the hero who died with this at his side went quickly.

This is so representative of what the heroes of WWII went through…. . Not only in the Pacific theatre, but the German front also. This was Bastogne in 1944. It’s in a friends private collection and it took some doing to be able to photograph it. I was shaking when I handed it back. I took these photos today.. A gentleman I know was kind enough to allow me that privilege. 

Often times we get so caught up in the gun we forget the sacrifices. This one really brings it home. It is believed that the this damage is from artillery fire. This weapon was very likely holstered at the time, and the soldier was facing the explosion. I can’t begin to tell you how powerful of a sentiment this raised in my heart to hold this.

I shared this in a few historical groups I belong to, so some of you have already seen this, but it’s just too powerful of an artifact not to share with the rest of you. Today I held hell in my hands.“


Credit to Daniel MacMurray on Facebook.

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Native tribe files legal challenge to Dakota Access Pipeline

  • In a last-ditch effort to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, one of the Native American tribes directly affected by construction filed a legal challenge in a federal court on Thursday morning, according to the Associated Press.
  • The legal action follows news that acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer ordered the United States Army Corps of Engineers to complete the $3.8 billion pipeline, despite mass protests from Native peoples whose land and water could be devastated by its construction. Read more

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In honor of Memorial Day: Capt. Oliver Burgess Meredith, United States Army Air Force during World War II. Photo taken at US Army Headquarters in London, June 10th, 1943. This is a photo of Burgess before his assignment to the 8th AF. Notice his Aviation Cadet wings. 

The only fan page solely dedicated to Burgess Meredith // Lovingly ran by his grandniece in attempt to keep his legacy alive.

During World War II, there was a large push for recruitment of some of the best art students across the country to join the United States Army.  They formed a “deception unit”, or a “ghost army” that appeared to look like a huge mass of soldiers, tanks, trucks and artillery.  However, it was all smoke and mirrors, consisting of inflatable tanks, sound design, and clever applications of fake tank tracks overnight.  Actors also met in pubs, planting false information.  This distracted the enemy from the real troops who were gathering.

To learn more about this fascinating undertaking, which was only de-classified fairly recently, check out the podcast on the subject from 99% Invisible.  (Photo from Retronaut/Mashable, England, c. 1939) 

Tactics Group MG14Z

MG-14Z - a twin barreled dual feed machinegun based on the MG42/MG3 chassis.

A small yet dynamic company located in the German city of Frankfurt, the Tactics Group GmbH corporation has drawn a lot of attention upon itself during the latest trade shows in Europe, thanks to its P-18 pistols − modern versions of the Austrian Steyr-Mannlicher GB Barnitzke-type gas-brake pistols − and thanks to its fancy modernized variations of the German World War 2-era “Fallschirmjägergewehr” Fg42 rifle.

However, the Tactics Group company is also well introduced in the field of defense manufacturing: it is the sole European distributor of the C-More M26-MASS modular assault shotgun system also used by the United States Army, and cooperated with Rheinmetall to take part to the “Kampwertsteigerung” program, which led to the spawning of the Mg3-KWS 7.62x51mm-NATO modernized general-purposes machinegun for the German Bundeswehr.

That’s why the Tactics Group’s latest and more fancy creation − the MG-14z − might actually have a future: conceived to enhance the firepower of these military units that still issue the Mg3 or other Mg42 variants − including the Italian MG-42/59 or the former Yugoslavian SARAC-53 − the MG-14z is as close as you could get to a double barrel MG.

Only the receivers of two separate MG3s remain in the MG-14z; everything is re-engineered and rebuilt from the ground up: new barrels with ventilated metal shrouds, new feeding ports, new twin feeding systems with downwards ejection, new single pistol grip and trigger, new common chassis.
As the project is currently ongoing, there’s no further information currently available about the MG-14z; the Tactics Group GmbH company however seems to believe in it, going as far as to call it “a low-cost alternative to Miniguns”.