united arab states

Some governments have “kill switches” that can turn off the internet in their country. Egypt did this during the Arab Spring uprising in 2011 to make it more difficult for protesters to coordinate their activity. Turkey and Iran have also shut off internet connectivity during protests. China is rumoured to have a kill switch of its own. And American senators have proposed creating one in the US as a means to defend the country from cyberattack. Building a kill switch is not easy, however. The larger and more developed the country, the harder it is to shut down the internet completely ­ there are simply too many connections between networks both inside and outside national borders.
—  Rachel Nuwer, ‘What if the internet stopped working for a day?’, BBC
huffingtonpost.com
Stop Calling Me White. I Am Arab.
To say I am white is to say that I have the ability to exercise the comfort of white privilege.

Excerpt:

To say we are white is to say that we have the ability to exercise the comfort of white privilege. It implies that we are void of discrimination and that our white counterparts accept us. Yet, it seems that the majority of discrimination we receive is from the very members of the group we have been placed in. To be called white, while simultaneously being taunted by Arab stereotypes, was detrimental to my own ethnic identity.

Countries, in alphabetical order, that have an Independence Day celebrating their departure from the United Kingdom: Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Bahrain, Belize, Botswana, Brunei, Cameroon, Canada, Cyprus, Dominica, Egypt, The Gambia, Ghana, Guyana, India, Iraq, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Lesotho, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, the United Arab Emirates, The United States, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Countries, in alphabetical order, that don’t deserve an Independence Day celebrating their departure from the European Union: The United Kingdom.

Muslim Countries Refuse to Take A Single Syrian Refugee, Cite Risk of Exposure to Terrorism - Five of the wealthiest Muslim countries have taken no Syrian refugees in at all, arguing that doing so would open them up to the risk of terrorism. Although the oil rich countries have handed over aid money, Britain has donated more than Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar combined - 6 September 2015

Between 10 and 12 million Syrians have been displaced by the bloody civil war raging in their country. Most still remain within Syria’s borders, but around four million have fled over the borders into neighbouring countries, mostly Turkey Jordan and Lebanon, and beyond.
Lebanon, which has 1.1 million Syrian refugees, shut her borders to the Syrians in June of last year. Jordan, host to another 630,000, followed suit in August last year, preventing more Syrians from abandoning their country.
By early August 2015, European states had received nearly 350,000 asylum applications from Syrians, nearly a third of whom applied to Germany for asylum. Another 65,000 have applied Sweden and 50,000 in Serbia. Hungary and Austria have received close to 19,000 applications each although that figure is likely to rise, while the UK is processing 7,030 applications, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR).
Yet amidst cries for Europe to do more, it has transpired that of the five wealthiest countries on the Arabian Peninsula, that is, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, Kuwait and Bahrain, not one has taken in a single refugee from Syria. Instead, they have argued that accepting large numbers of Syrians is a threat to their safety, as terrorists could be hiding within an influx of people. Sherif Elsayid-Ali, Amnesty International’s Head of Refugee and Migrants’ Rights, has slammed their inaction as “shameful”.
He said: “The records of Gulf countries is absolutely appalling, in terms of actually showing compassion and sharing the responsibility of this crisis… It is a disgrace.” None of the Gulf States signed the 1951 Refugee Convention, which legally defines a refugee as “A person who owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality”. However, they have taken refugees in the past.
Twenty-five years ago, hundreds of thousands of Kuwaitis fleeing Saddam Hussein’s invasion were given refuge. According to Arabian expert Sultan Sooud al-Qassemi: “in Abu Dhabi, the government rented out entire apartment blocks and gave them to families for free.”
Instead the countries, all of which are within the Top 50 list of wealthiest nations by GDP, have opted to donate aid to those affected by the crisis. According to the , the UAE has funded a refugee camp in Jordan giving shelter to tens of thousands of Syrians, while Saudi Arabia and Qatar have donated funds, food, shelter and clothing to Syrians in Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan.
Total donations from the Gulf States are believe to total £589 million, less than a quarter of America’s £2.8 billion, and a fraction of the £65 billion they spent on defence in 2012 alone. The UK has handed over £920 million so far, but the Prime Minister yesterday pledged to increase that figure to £1 billion. He also promised to take in thousands more refugees.
Al-Qassemi has argued in the that the standing that the Muslim countries now have in the world confer on them a moral obligation to step in. “The Gulf States have emerged as the nerve centres of Arab diplomacy, culture, media production, commerce and tourism, amassing an unprecedented degree of soft power unrivalled in the region and beyond,” he said.
They also form “the most influential bloc within the 70-year-old Arab League.”
“But with great power comes great responsibility. The Gulf must realise that now is the time to change their policy regarding accepting refugees from the Syria crisis. It is the moral, ethical and responsible step to take.”

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The Morality Police, USA, 1920. 

Just as compulsory as morality polices today in Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, and formerly Gaza Strip and Sudan. 

It is so bizarre and sporadic to pay policemen to arrest women who practice their right of dress. If it was changed in the USA, it can be changed in everywhere else; if enough people are standing up against retardation.

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Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPonthego

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes and hashtags. For a chance to be featured, follow @instagram and look for a post every week announcing the latest project.

#WHPonthego asked community members to make photos and videos that capture people and objects in motion. Each week, we feature some of our favorite submissions from the project, but be sure to check out the rest here.