union-general

buzzfeed.com
Hundreds Of Thousands Of Workers Will Strike May 1, Organizers Say
A major union local and a coalition of worker centers have voted to strike on International Workers Day, calling for others to join.
By Cora Lewis

Almost 350,000 service workers plan to strike on May 1, a traditional day for labor activism across the world, in the most direct attempt yet by organized labor to capture the energy from a resurgent wave of activism across the country since the election of Donald Trump.

Tens of thousands of members of a powerful California branch of the Service Employees International Union will participate in the strike, according to David Huerta, the president of the chapter.

“We understand that there’s risk involved in that,” Huerta told BuzzFeed News, “but we’re willing to take that risk in order to be able to move forward in this moment, while the most marginalized are in the crosshairs of this administration.”

Since Donald Trump’s election, there has been no shortage of wildcat strikes by groups disproportionately affected by his administration’s policies. But this time around, organized labor is driving the effort. According to a coalition of groups leading the strike, more than 300,000 food chain workers and 40,000 unionized service workers have said they will walk off the job so far.

Huerta’s union chapter represents tens of thousands of workers, including janitors, security officers and airport staff, while the Food Chain Workers Alliance, which represents workers throughout the food industry, says hundreds of thousands of its non-unionized members have committed to striking.

“We are a workforce made up mostly of immigrants, women, African Americans, and indigenous people….Without workers, who does Trump think will harvest the crops, craft the food, transport it to market, stock the shelves, cook in kitchens, and serve the meals?”

It’s on!

This is how Leila Khalid views/viewed “western leftism” and it’s so, so incredibly accurate. I made it a bit easier to read:

“The training schedule was exacting, but occasionally left us time for a little fun. We were “entertaining” a group of foreign students and trying to lead a Bedouin kind of life in order to politicize our Bedouin population. The students had been attending an international solidarity meeting in Amman held under the auspices of the General union of Palestinian Students. Most were graduates of the 1968 university upheavals in the West. We found it very amusing that they honestly believed they were making a “revolution” if they undressed in public, seized a university building, or shouted an obscenity at bureaucrats. I was initially opposed and refused to talk to them, even though some believed in violent revolution, because I didn’t want to be another experimental “guinea-pig” to Westerners.

I finally relented and I am glad I did. I hadn’t met Western “revolutionaries” before. It turned out they represented an unfamiliar cultural rather than a political phenomenon. Some seemed to have read the history political literature of the left, but most regarded the Marxist-Leninist leaders disdainfully, with the exception of the “Young Marx”, who held some sort of fascination for revolution. Some Americans were quite serious and believed in the historic mission of the working class and were making plants to integrate themselves with the masses. 

What astonished us most about this group was that they were opposed to nationalism, a doctrine we hold dearly as a colonized and dissipated people. Some believed in violence for “the hell of it” and in students as revolutionary agents of history. But the majority were inclined towards guerrilla theatre as a means of “making revolution”. They performed a little for us.

As they were departing I was rather struck by a French anarchist student who proclaimed “Let chaos reign” and by a German who echoed the same sentiment. I exclaimed that the Palestinian people were an example of a society in chaos without authority and leadership, which as a result, was left at the mercy of the Zionist oppressor. I asked them what could they prescribe for us in order to overcome our kind of “alienation” -beards, long hair, and toy guns? They merely paused, they smiled, they reflected, they inhaled and passed their joints on in universal wonder.”

Today children, you are going to learn about MOTHERFUCKING DAN SICKLES, one of the weirdest American Civil War Veterans EVER!

^ This man spent most of his life partying and sleeping around, but he needs to have his crazy life mentioned!

THIS ASSHOLE was a lawyer and a “political machine” he did dirty deals, messed with votes, and was into highly illegal stuff. You know what happened? Went to trial, never jail, marries a 16 year old when he’s 33, becomes a  CONGRESSMAN! 

His wife cheats on him (he’d done the same for years), He CHASES DOWN the man add shoots him 5 TIMES (2 ended up as misfires). The man dies. He goes to trial. FIRST MAN EVER declared NOT GUILTY due to TEMPORARY INSANITY!

CIVIL WAR occurs. They make him a GENERAL. He knows NOTHING about military tactics. They leave him on the sidelines until the Battle of GETTEYSBURG, one of the bloodiest battles EVER in the US. Where they put him in the middle of EVERYTHING!

So this MORON breaks the line and risks the UNION ARMY for this tiny bitty piece of land that is slightly higher than where he was, because somewhere someone told him it was better to have the high ground.

What happens?

His men get their ASSES KCKED, and he gets his MOTHERFUCKING LEG blow off by a canon! And while he was getting carried off the battlefield HE LIGHTS A CIGAR AND HAS THEM GO BACK FOR HIS LEG! Afterwards none of his men even blamed him for the deaths because they all liked him so much! GETS THE MEDAL OF HONOR! and DONATES HIS LEG for medical science.

After the war? He becomes MINSTER OF SPAIN, his wife dies, and he DATES QUEEN ISABELLA II in France!

Remarries someone else, moves back to the US and becomes a congressman AGAIN!

He died, in debt, at 95 but still manages to have a BIGASS FUNERAL!

DAN SICKLES!!!!

Soviet troops on the American medium tank M3 “General Lee” come into the liberated city of Vyazma.

In the pictures the tank is well marked rubber tracks — the biggest drawback of the M3 “General Lee”. During the battle, the rubber is burnt out and the caterpillar was falling apart — the tank was a sitting target.

Louise Otto-Peters (1819-1895) was a German author, journalist, and activist, widely seen as the initiator of the women’s movement in her home country. She began writing fiction in order to support herself financially, but ended up getting involved in social and political issues, inspired by the revolutionary ideas of her time.

She founded the newspaper Frauen-Zeitung (Women’s News) in 1848, which led to the formation of several women’s circles around Germany. In 1865 she co-founded the General Union of German Women, an organization that grew to more than 11,000 members in a matter of years.

buzzfeed.com
Hundreds Of Thousands Of Workers Will Strike May 1, Organizers Say
A major union local and a coalition of worker centers have voted to strike on International Workers Day, calling for others to join.
By Cora Lewis

Almost 350,000 service workers plan to strike on May 1, a traditional day for labor activism across the world, in the most direct attempt yet by organized labor to capture the energy from a resurgent wave of activism across the country since the election of Donald Trump.

Tens of thousands of members of a powerful California branch of the Service Employees International Union will participate in the strike, according to David Huerta, the president of the chapter.

“We understand that there’s risk involved in that,” Huerta told BuzzFeed News, “but we’re willing to take that risk in order to be able to move forward in this moment, while the most marginalized are in the crosshairs of this administration.”

Today in labor history, February 25, 1941: The February Strike begins. It was a general strike in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands by workers against the pogroms and deportation of Jews in Amsterdam. It was the only direct action of its kind during World War II in Europe against the Nazis’ treatment of Jews. The strike is commemorated annually on February 25 at the statue of the De Dokwerker (“The Dock Worker”) in Amsterdam.

youtube

On The Frontlines: A Weekend as a Civil War Reenactor

TIME reporter Nate Rawlings joins a group of devout reenactors at Gettysburg, in a season of reenactments honoring Civil War anniversaries.

Reenacting the American Civil War began even before the real fighting had ended. Civil War veterans recreated battles as a way to remember their fallen comrades and to teach others what the war was all about.  

Motion picture and television producers often turn to reenactment groups for support; films like Gettysburg, Glory and Gods and Generals benefited greatly from the input of reenactors, who arrived on set fully equipped and steeped in knowledge of military procedures, camp life, and tactics. 

In a documentary about the making of the film Gettysburg, actor Sam Elliott, who portrayed Union General John Buford in the film, said of reenactors:

“I think we’re really fortunate to have those people involved. In fact, they couldn’t be making this picture without them; there’s no question about that. These guys come with their wardrobe, they come with their weaponry. They come with all the accoutrements, but they also come with the stuff in their head and the stuff in their heart.”

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June 19th 1865: Juneteenth

On this day in 1865, the abolition of slavery was formally proclaimed in Texas, in an event which has been celebrated as ‘Juneteenth’ (a contraction of ‘June 19th’). President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves in rebelling Confederate states not under Union occupation, on January 1st 1863. However, the proclamation had little effect in areas like Texas which were not under Union control. It was two years later, in June 1865, when Union troops under Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, that abolition came to the state. The Union contingent brought the news that the American Civil War was over, following the surrender of Robert E. Lee in April. Upon his arrival, General Granger read General Order Number 3 declaring slavery abolished, leading thousands of former slaves to leave the state to seek employment or to find their families. Slavery was formally abolished throughout the entire United States with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution in December 1865. Juneteenth was one of the first celebrations commemorating the abolition of slavery in the United States, and served as a poignant time for the black community in Texas and elsewhere to come together in solidarity as they endured the hardship of Jim Crow which followed emancipation. The celebration of Juneteenth waned during the early twentieth century, largely due to financial concerns, but resurged with the onset of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1980, Juneteenth became an official state holiday in Texas, making it the first state-recognised emancipation celebration. Now, Juneteenth is spreading beyond Texas, and has become a day for celebrating African-American achievement, and remembering the legacy of slavery.

“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free”
- General Order Number 3, read by General Granger June 19th 1865

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Whitworth target rifle

Designed in 1858, manufactured in Birmingham, United Kingdom c.1863.
.451(bore)/.475(rifling), hexagonal lead bullet, caplock, single shot.

One of the most sough-after long-distance rifle in both side of the American Civil War, one such rifle was used by a Confederate sniper at the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse to land a hit just below Union Major General John “Uncle John” Sedgwick’s left eye, who himself probably gave us the best last word ever uttered :

“What? Men dodging this way for single bullets? What will you do when they open fire along the whole line? Why are you dodging like this? They couldn’t hit an elephant at this distance.”

Another Whitworth rifle fitted with a William Malcolm scope.

White regiments, black regiments, regulars and Rough Riders, representing the young manhood of North and South, fought soldier to soldier, unmindful of race or color, unmindful of whether commanded by ex-Confederate or not, and mindful only of their common duty as Americans.

John J. Pershing

Today in labor history, June 15, 2000: In Quito, Ecuador, union and student demonstrators participating in a general strike are met with tear gas when they try to approach the Government Palace. Trade unions and grassroots organizations called for a general strike in the country against International Monetary Fund economic “reforms,” which included privatization of state-owned companies and other measures.