unha-3

Seoul tracked Pyongyang rocket's successful space launch

Seoul, Feb 7 (IANS) South Korean’s military has seen a rocket launched by North Korea successfully entering into space, regarding it as a intercontinental ballistic missile similar to the Unha-3 rocket test-fired in late 2012.


South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff reported on the launch to the parliamentary defence committee on Sunday, according to Rep. Yun Hu-deok of the main opposition Minju Party, a member of the committee, Xinhua reported.

The South Korean military estimated that North Korean rocket was a three-stage ICBM similar to the Unha-3 rocket, launched by Pyongyang in December 2012.

The rocket is believed to have a range of about 5,500-10,000 km. The first stage of the rocket fell in waters near South Korea’s western border island of Baengnyeong, with the second stage landing off the southwest of the southern resort island of Jeju.

Where the third stage landed has not been identified as it disappeared from radars of South Korea’s military.

To track the North Korean rocket after the launch, South Korea had deployed surveillance assets, including Aegis-equipped destroyer, ground-based Green Pine radar and Peace Eye airborne early warning and control aircraft.

No civilian damage in South Korea has been reported from aircrafts and shipping. The rocket did not fly over South Korea’s territory.

North Korea’s state media reported on Sunday that it had successfully launched a Kwangmyongsong-4 earth observation satellite into orbit just nine minutes and 46 seconds after the launch at 9.30 a.m. (local time).

Pyongyang has claimed the rocket launch is a space programme for peaceful purpose, but Seoul has denounced it as ballistic missile development. Rockets and ballistic missiles have lots of overlapping technologies.

The launch came a day after North Korea announced its revised plan to move up the launch window to February 7-14 from the previous February 8-25.

On January 6, Pyongyang said it had tested what it claimed was its first hydrogen bomb in violation of UN Security Council resolutions.

North Korea is banned under UN Security Council resolutions from testing a rocket by use of ballistic missile technology and staging a nuclear test. Pyongyang detonated atomic devices in 2006, 2009 and 2013.

South Korea’s presidential office criticised the launch, saying that it came in defiance of repeated warnings from the international community. Seoul called for tougher new sanctions against Pyongyang at the UN Security Council.

President Park Geun-hye convened an emergency meeting of the national security council, and Seoul’s foreign ministry requested an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council to discuss counter-measures.

South Korean Defence Minister Han Min-koo held a meeting with General Curtis Scaparrotti, commander of the US Forces in Korea (USFK), saying Pyongyang’s missile launch was a direct challenge to the international community as it came amid ongoing discussions at the UN Security Council about new sanctions against Pyongyang’s fourth nuclear test.

Han stressed the need for additional pressures on North Korea to make it recognise a fact that the country cannot survive unless it gives up nuclear weapons. He called for close cooperation between Seoul and Washington in response to a series of recent North Korean provocations.

Where Is North Korea's Missile Program Headed?

February 5, 2016

Satellites, Warheads and Rockets: Is North Korea’s Space Program Really about Missile Development?

John Schilling

38north.org

February 5, 2016

Editor’s Note: While it’s unclear what SLV model North Korea will use in its upcoming satellite launch, if they use the Unha-3 rocket again, John Schilling discusses what lessons North Korea could learn. This article was originally published on September 28, 2015. 
When the Soviet Union shocked the world and opened the Space Age on October 4, 1957, it was not a coincidence that its first satellite was launched into orbit on a modified R-7 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). For many observers, that was the message of Sputnik-the rocket that did this, can deliver hydrogen bombs to your cities. Nor was the message sent only once. The first 96 Soviet satellite launches were conducted using modified ICBMs, before Russian engineers bothered to design a rocket specifically for space missions. China still hasn’t bothered to field a space launch vehicle (SLV) that isn’t also a ballistic missile. On the other side of the world, every ICBM design the United States has ever put into service has been adapted to launch satellites at some time or another.
So when North Korea launched its first satellite on December 12, 2012, many observers thought the message was clear: the rocket that did this, can deliver atomic bombs to your cities. And indeed it can. But is this really the purpose of the Unha-3? Is it an ICBM masquerading as an SLV, or an SLV that might someday be repurposed as a missile? There is precedent for both. Or, as Pyongyang claims, is the Unha-3 intended purely for peaceful space exploration?
There are sound technical reasons for using the same rocket in both applications. The fundamental requirement for an ICBM is to accelerate a hydrogen bomb sized payload to roughly 16,000 miles per hour, just above the atmosphere and aimed about 20 degrees above the horizon. To launch a satellite, you want to be a little bit higher, flying horizontally at 18,000 miles per hour. Until your satellites grow larger than your bombs, there is no reason to develop a second rocket, and no way for suspicious outsiders to know for sure what your real goals are.
But if the Unha-3 is intended for use as an ICBM, it’s not a very good one . The second- and third-stage engines don’t have enough thrust to efficiently deliver heavy warheads; a militarized Unha might deliver 800 kilograms of payload to Washington, DC. The North Koreans can probably make a nuclear warhead that small, but it would be a tight fit. With bigger upper-stage engines, which we know the North Koreans have, they could deliver substantially larger payloads. This would allow bigger and more powerful warheads, more decoys to counter US missile defenses, and a generally tougher and more robust system.
The Unha is also too heavy and cumbersome to be survivable in wartime. Too big for any mobile transporter, it can only be launched from fixed sites. Its highly corrosive liquid propellants require hours of pre-launch preparations. That’s a bad combination for North Korea; their fixed launch sites are going to be watched very closely, and particularly in a crisis, any indication that an ICBM is being prepared for launch could trigger a pre-emptive strike.
The same could be said of the old Soviet R-7. As an ICBM, it was pretty much a dud-the USSR never deployed more than 10, and retired them after less than a decade. As a space launch vehicle, its descendants are still in service today.
The North Koreans could press the Unha-3 into limited service as an ICBM, just as the USSR did with the R-7-a temporary measure, until something better is available. They can almost certainly build something better, and they appear to be trying. The KN-08 missile mock-ups, twice paraded through Pyongyang, are exactly the sort of thing a nation like North Korea would build if it wanted to use its eclectic mix of early 1960s rocket technologies to build an ICBM. It is small enough to be mobile and therefore survivable but with the performance (barely) to reach the enemy’s homeland. The Unha-3, by comparison, looks like it was designed to launch satellites rather than warheads.
Read the full analysis at 38 North.
Imágenes por satélite confirman actividad en base norcoreana de misiles

Seúl, 29 ene (EFE).- Imágenes por satélite de la base norcoreana de Sohae confirmaron hoy que hay movimiento en las instalaciones y que Pyongyang podría estar preparando el lanzamiento de un proyectil de largo alcance, tal y como han advertido Seúl, Tokio y Washington.
Las imágenes publicadas y analizadas hoy por la web especializada en Corea del Norte 38 north, muestran “actividades de baja intensidad” en esta estación de lanzamiento situada en la provincia de Pyongan del Norte, en el extremo noroccidental del país.
Esto indica que el régimen de Kim Jong-un estaría en las “fases tempranas de preparación para el lanzamiento de un vehículo espacial”, una acción que el año pasado Pyongyang aseguró que realizaría en un futuro próximo.
Los lanzamientos de satélites a bordo de cohetes son sancionados por la comunidad internacional, que los considera ensayos encubiertos de misiles balísticos intercontinentales.
Corea del Norte lanzó por última vez un cohete Unha-3, con el cual puso en órbita un satélite de su programa Kwangmyongsong (“Estrella brillante”), desde esta misma base en diciembre de 2012.
Los movimientos detectados y reportados en la víspera por Japón y Corea del Sur, y más tarde confirmados por Estados Unidos, se producen poco después de que el régimen Juché realizara el pasado 6 de enero su cuarta prueba nuclear subterránea, la primera supuestamente con una bomba de hidrógeno.
38 north, web ligada a la universidad estadounidense Johns Hopkins, indicó que, aunque es “poco probable” que el lanzamiento se produzca a lo largo de la próxima semana, “es importante subrayar que hay un alto grado de incertidumbre” en torno a lo que sucede en Sohae.
La principal razón de esto, apunta el portal especializado, es que Corea del Norte mantiene cubierta la torre de lanzamiento y otras instalaciones próximas desde mediados del año pasado, lo que impide ver si el proyectil está siendo acoplado dentro de la estructura.
Además, indica que los técnicos norcoreanos pueden aprovechar la noche o los momentos en que el cielo esté cubierto (cuando los satélites son incapaces de obtener imágenes) para trasladar las fases del proyectil con las plataformas móviles y armarlo dentro de la torre recubierta.
El informe concluye diciendo que si “Corea del Norte mantiene las prácticas” de anteriores lanzamientos, en los próximos días se vería un incremento de actividad en toda la base de Sohae. EFE

Corea del Norte prepara un nuevo test de misil de largo alcance, según Tokio

Tokio, 28 ene (EFE).- Corea del Norte podría estar preparando un nuevo ensayo de misil balístico de largo alcance tras su reciente cuarta prueba nuclear, según señalaron hoy fuentes del Gobierno de Japón a la agencia local de noticias Kyodo.
Los servicios de inteligencia japoneses han observado una intensificación de la actividad durante los últimos días en las instalaciones de lanzamiento de Dongchang-ri, al nordeste de la península coreana, a partir de imágenes tomadas vía satélite, explicaron las citadas fuentes.
Según estos indicios, la inteligencia nipona cree que el lanzamiento podría tener lugar hacia finales de la próxima semana, al tiempo que los países del Consejo de Seguridad de Naciones Unidas contemplan imponer sanciones adicionales a Pyongyang por su ensayo atómico de comienzos de mes.
El último lanzamiento de este tipo tuvo lugar en 2012, cuando el régimen “juche” logró poner en órbita un satélite con su cohete de largo alcance Unha-3, una acción que la comunidad internacional consideró como parte de su programa de desarrollo de misiles balísticos intercontinentales y que dio lugar a nuevas sanciones de la ONU.
En la víspera, China acordó con EEUU la necesidad de impulsar una nueva resolución del Consejo de Seguridad de la ONU contra Corea del Norte por su ensayo nuclear ejecutado el pasado 6 de enero, aunque ambos países no lograron una postura común sobre su contenido y la incorporación de sanciones.
En dicha prueba atómica, el régimen liderado por Kim Jong-un aseguró haber detonado por primera vez una potente bomba de hidrógeno, aunque la mayoría de expertos considera exagerada la afirmación y sostiene que Corea del Norte probablemente hizo estallar una dispositivo de fisión potenciada.
Los expertos advierten del peligro de que Pyongyang consiga miniaturizar dispositivos nucleares para equiparlos sobre misiles y logre también desarrollar tecnología de misiles balísticos para submarino, cuya naturaleza móvil ampliaría enormemente el alcance de su arsenal y haría difícil detectar sus lanzamientos. EFE

La Corée du Nord se remet en orbite balistique

La Corée du Nord se remet en orbite balistique

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Photo du site de lancement de fusée Unha-3 au centre spatial de Tangchai-ri, en Corée du Nord, le 8 avril 2012 Photo PEDRO UGARTE. AFP Un mois après son quatrième essai nucléaire le régime nord coréen a procédé ce dimanche un tir de fusée en violation de toutes les résolutions du Conseil de sécurité qui va se réunir en urgence. La Corée du Nord se remet en orbite balistique Pour la deuxième fois…

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What N. Korea rocket launch may mean for region and world

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Science

What N. Korea rocket launch may mean for region and world

After several repeated failures, North Korea successfully put a satellite into orbit aboard its three-stage Unha-3 rocket in December 2012. The North’s space agency said Sunday it successfully put a new Earth observation satellite, the Kwangmyongsong 4, or Shining Star 4, into orbit less than 10 minutes after liftoff, and vowed more such launches. The United States and South Korea are still analyzing the launch.

South Korean defense officials say that a North Korean missile developed earlier than the Unha-3 rocket of 2012 has an estimated potential range of up to 10,000 kilometers (6,210 miles), which puts Hawaii and the northwest coast of the U.S. mainland within reach. But critics say the North still has some technical barriers to surmount to achieve reliable nuclear weapons that can attack faraway targets.

S.Korea sees DPRK rocket's successful launch into space

S.Korea sees DPRK rocket’s successful launch into space

South Korean’s military has seen a rocket launched by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) successfully entering into space, regarding it as a similar intercontinental ballistic missile to the Unha-3 rocket test-fired in late 2012.

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AP Photos: Rocket models in North Korean propaganda displays

The Unha 3 rocket that launched the “Bright Star” satellite into space in 2012 is a symbol of North Korea’s technological successes and a matter of great national pride. The country plans another launch to put Earth observation satellite into orbit this month. Although the equipment it will use is not yet known, the launch could also advance its military-use missile technology further.

Corea del norte anuncia el lanzamiento de un satélite al espacio

Corea del norte anuncia el lanzamiento de un satélite al espacio

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“Hemos recibido información de Corea del Norte respecto al lanzamiento de un satélite de observación de la tierra Kwangmyongsong entre el 8 y 25 de febrero”, informó una portavoz de la OMI. Corea del Norte realizó su último lanzamiento de un cohete de largo alcance Unha-3 en diciembre de 2012, poniendo en órbita un satélite de comunicación. El ministro norcoreano de Telecomunicaciones, Kim…

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North Korea plans to try again to orbit satellite (and test ICBM tech)
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The Unha-3 rocket, the platform for North Korea’s (sort of) successful satellite launch in 2012. Another launch has been announced for February.

Watch the skies. In an alert filed with the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization, the government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (otherwise known as North Korea) announced plans to launch a satellite sometime in February. The nation also provided warnings for the areas where its boost stages might plummet back to the surface. Japan’s Ministry of Defense has since announced that Japan will shoot down the rocket if it flies toward Japan.

The launch, from North Korea’s western coast near its border with China, will likely be the latest version of North Korea’s Kwangmyŏngsŏng (“Bright Star”) satellite series, aboard the latest version of the Unha (“Galaxy”) rocket. The splash locations given by North Korea for the launch—the first stage landing in the Yellow Sea between South Korea and China and the second in the Philippine Sea east of the Philippines—are nearly identical to those of North Korea’s last orbital effort.

The launch announcement comes just a month after a surprise nuclear weapons test in which the regime of Kim Jong-un claimed to have detonated a thermonuclear bomb. North Korea also claims to have developed a miniaturized nuclear warhead that could be placed atop a ballistic missile, though US intelligence officials have downplayed those reports.

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North Korea plans to try again to orbit satellite (and test ICBM tech)
External image

The Unha-3 rocket, the platform for North Korea’s (sort of) successful satellite launch in 2012. Another launch has been announced for February.

Watch the skies. In an alert filed with the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization, the government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (otherwise known as North Korea) announced plans to launch a satellite sometime in February. The nation also provided warnings for the areas where its boost stages might plummet back to the surface. Japan’s Ministry of Defense has since announced that Japan will shoot down the rocket if it flies toward Japan.

The launch, from North Korea’s western coast near its border with China, will likely be the latest version of North Korea’s Kwangmyŏngsŏng (“Bright Star”) satellite series, aboard the latest version of the Unha (“Galaxy”) rocket. The splash locations given by North Korea for the launch—the first stage landing in the Yellow Sea between South Korea and China and the second in the Philippine Sea east of the Philippines—are nearly identical to those of North Korea’s last orbital effort.

The launch announcement comes just a month after a surprise nuclear weapons test in which the regime of Kim Jong-un claimed to have detonated a thermonuclear bomb. North Korea also claims to have developed a miniaturized nuclear warhead that could be placed atop a ballistic missile, though US intelligence officials have downplayed those reports.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments



via www.computechtechnologyservices.com

1. Ande suavemente.
2. Cubra as suas palavras com mel, mas mantenha as suas unhas como garras.
3. Ouça os fantasmas.
4. Leve sempre um pássaro no seu peito e um leão na sua cabeça.
5. Saiba que a idade não é sabedoria, e há tanto a ser aprendido a partir das árvores, a partir dos livros.
6. Você não nasce com uma família. Faça uma.
7. Lembre-se que uma coisa não precisa de propósito para ter beleza.
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9. Deleite-se com o caos, então dobre-o com a sua vontade.
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13. Você é a criança changeling, magia nascida em pequenos corpos com corações ainda não experimentados… Não os desperdice.”