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Under Obama, Trump called job reports “phony.” Now he loves ‘em.

  • Employers added 235,000 new jobs in February, dropping the unemployment rate to 4.7%, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced in their monthly jobs report released on Friday.
  • It’s a number Trump touted, retweeting a Drudge Report headline saying the economy is “GREAT AGAIN” in all capital letters.
  • But Trump once called the same report he is now celebrating “phony,” saying real unemployment numbers were much higher than the what the BLS reported. Read more (3/10/17 9:41 PM)

“Should any political party attempt to abolish social security, unemployment insurance, and eliminate labor laws and farm programs, you would not hear of that party again in our political history. There is a tiny splinter group, of course, that believes that you can do these things. Among them are a few Texas oil millionaires, and an occasional politician or businessman from other areas. Their number is negligible and they are stupid.”

President Eisenhower

anonymous asked:

I get that Millennials aren't perfect or absolved of the issues that Boomers have, but shouldn't Boomers tale the brunt of the blame seeing as they are the ones with all the powers in government right now and make up most of the work force? And if there are issues in the Millennial generation, well, who raised us?

Look, I’ve got a long-standing beef with Millennial v. Boomer discourse that I could spend a few hours on, but lemme try to sum it up briefly. 

Many of the modern economic problems that affect many Millennials that are often blamed on Baby Boomers (unemployment/underemployment, soaring costs of education, loan debt, comparative lack of opportunities, poverty, etc. etc.) started well before our generation came of age. Most of these same economic issues fucked up Generation X before us, but because they were a smaller generation, people didn’t hear about it as much. And most of these problems grew directly from right-wing political and economic policies that began in the Reagan presidency in the 1980s, before the Boomers were in political ascendancy. (Yes, there were a few young Boomers in Reagan’s administration, but the leading neocons/neoliberals, using the actual meaning of the term, not the tumblr left’s version of it, who led the move rightward were older.) Boomers, by virtue of their age, enjoyed the unique benefits of the post-War (1945-1980) economy and many managed to escape the worst effects of the Reagan Era cuts, but not all did equally (see below.) And many of them, personally, are total clueless assholes about how unique their experience was. I have Boomer parents born in the early 50s, so like I know.  But one of the biggest problems I have with Millennial/Boomer discourse is that it de-politicizes and de-contextualizes important social/political/economic shifts that were the direct result of Republican policies. It reduces it all to just a generational conflict in which one selfish group of people just didn’t want to share their toys with their kids. And even if you accept the idea that one generation can personally screw over another via political means, the idea that Boomers would target their own children specifically is particularly odd. Though I’ll also point out that the “who raised us” issue is more complex, as the Boomer generation ends in 1964, and quite a lot of people born in the 90s who could still be considered Millennials, have parents born after that. 

As for the idea that Boomers make up the majority of the workforce, actually Millennials are now the largest segment of the workforce, slightly ahead of Gen X, with Boomers well behind. The oldest boomers are 71 now, and the youngest are 53. A lot of the oldest ones have retired and the younger ones are on their way there. X  As for having “all the powers in government” that’s a pretty hard thing to quantify. Trump and many of his key advisers are Boomers, but there are a number of GenX and Millennials too. Which is why I get annoyed at the idea that Millennials are somehow innately more compassionate and kind than older generations, because not really. Millennials overall are more democratic/left leaning than older voters, but Trump still won among white millennials.  Many baby boomers, too, were very liberal in their youth, and became more conservative with age, especially the white ones. It’s a pretty common thing to happen. It’s not as if that fate is going to magically spare our generation, so most of this discourse is not going to age well.

Which brings me to the other issue, that you can legitimately talk about Millennials and Baby Boomers as distinct groups with similar characteristics and experiences. Most of this discourse is highly race and class based but people don’t seem to acknowledge that. It’s focused around the experiences of middle to upper class white boomers and their kids, who presumably don’t have it as easy. And in many cases, this is probably true. Though if you’ve read any financial news in the last few years, they’ve been talking a lot about the huge amount of “wealth transfer” that has started from well-off Boomers to their kids. But for many other Boomers, this wealth never materialized. Plenty of people never had access to it thanks to their race or immigrant status. So the idea that one generation “owns everything” or needs to “take the blame” blurs the fact that within any generation there are huge differences in wealth and access to power.

Basically millennial/boomer discourse is ahistorical, apolitical, and focused on the experiences and expectations of middle class white kids, and that’s why I’m not here for it.

Millennial College Grads, Reblog if you:

Are unemployed

Underemployed (working less than part time or working on-call or seasonally)

Can’t find a job in your field

Are not working full-time but have been seeking full time employment for a long time

Are not financially stable or are struggling financially

Are drowning in student loans that you can barely afford to pay off

Have seldom received call-backs for jobs you applied for

Are under-qualified for nearly every job that you find (especially entry level jobs wanting multiple years of professional experience and skills with software you’ve never heard of)

Come from a low-income or poor background and only have financial support from your parents or parent 

Still live at home

Want to go back to school to pursue another major or earn your master’s degree but you don’t have the money

You know exactly what you want to do as a career but can’t get a foot in the door

If any of these apply to you, please reblog. I’m currently going through an existential crisis and I just want to know that I’m not alone. I have friends who are in similar situations but they are always somehow able to find jobs or some kind of help before I do and I have been stuck in the same situation since I graduated from college. I’ve been applying for jobs for 2 years and have yet to find anything permanent. I haven’t found a summer job and I only have one more month until summer if over and I am pretty much out of money. My mom has been helping me out, though. And my job as a teacher’s assistant during the fall and spring are usually 4-8 hours a week since I work after-school only. And I can’t survive on what they pay me. In the midsts of constantly hearing from older generations that millennials are lazy and that we have character flaws that are causing us these problems, I guess I need to be reminded that these problems still affects a lot of people in our generation. We’ve worked our asses off and we still are and we’re not getting the same opportunities and job security that the many non-college educated generation X and Baby Boomers have had.