undersea explorer

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Jacques Cousteau, the world famous oceanographer and undersea explorer who invented the Aqua-Lung, dared to go where no one had gone before. 

He followed his passion to both protect and better understand our world’s oceans and the creatures that inhabited them. Cousteau was 65 at the time of this recording but he was still diving and hungry for more exploration and adventure. Here’s his story.

Every time they revamp Aquaman, I always hope they’ll go back to the original concept of an undersea explorer whose strange powers came from Atlantean science. 

The story must start with my father, a famous undersea explorer — if I spoke his name, you would recognize it. My mother died when I was a baby, and he turned to his work of solving the ocean’s secrets. His greatest discovery was an ancient city, in the depths where no other diver had ever penetrated. My father believed it was the lost kingdom of Atlantis. He made himself a water-tight home in one of the palaces and lived there, studying the records and devices of the race’s marvelous wisdom. From the books and records, he learned ways of teaching me to live under the ocean, drawing oxygen from the water and using all the power of the sea to make me wonderfully strong and swift. By training and a hundred scientific secrets, I became what you see — a human being who lives and thrives under the water.

I basically enjoy Aquaman, but we’ve had almost sixty years of the Silver Age version. I’d love to go back to the original concept, even for a year or two.

Always loved, too, that he grew up in an undersea palace and then made his crimefighting headquarters inside a wrecked-as-fuck fishing boat. Aquaman was a slumming hipster. He was gentrifying the ocean floor.

Superheroes signs

Aries

Hellboy

“But if there must be an end, let it be loud. Let it be bloody. Better to burn than to wither away in the dark.”
— Mike Mignola (Hellboy, Vol. 6: Strange Places (Hellboy, #6))

Taurus

Wonder Woman

“Active or ambitious women were not only rare but often evil. Wonder Woman flipped this paradigm by embodying the strength, assertiveness, and independence usually associated with bad girls and villains in a positive heroic light. The Golden Age Wonder Woman was a blatant rejection of the good girl/bad girl binary and even offered a critique of the good girl role.”  
 ―    Tim Hanley,   Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine    

Gemini

Spider Man

“It’s always easy to be what you are– What’s hard is to be what you want to be.”               

  —    Spiderman

Cancer

Black Panther

      – but perhaps I do need to talk a bit about home – about days long forgotten – about nights lost in time’s shadow – and about the origin of one whom the outside world has called – The Panther!     

–T'Challa

Leo

Superman

You asked me what “being Superman” means. Being Superman doesn’t mean I’m greater than anyone. But it does mean I’m better than you.    

– Kal-El

Virgo

Captain America

You have your definition of a hero and I have mine — and mine includes being a lot more aware.  

  –Steven Rogers

Libra

Daredevil

     I’m a blind lawyer with a history of incarceration and personal tragedy. What in that make-up makes you think I have a sense of humor?   

– Matt Murdock

Scorpio

Spawn

Spawn: You sent me to Hell! I’m here to return the favor!

- Spawn (1997).

Sagittarius

Green Arrow

Tell your friends there’s a hunter on the streets. This is my town now, and creeps like you are an endangered species.

–Oliver Queen 

Capricorn

Batman

Bruce Wayne: It’s not who I am underneath, but what I do that defines me. 

- Batman Trilogy

Aquarius

The Atom

 Now that I am able to turn myself into a human Atom – who knows what strange and wonderful things may happen? 

–Raymond Palmer 

Pisces

Aquaman

The story must start with my father, a famous undersea explorer — if I spoke his name, you would recognize it. My mother died when I was a baby, and he turned to his work of solving the ocean’s secrets. His greatest discovery was an ancient city, in the depths where no other diver had ever penetrated. My father believed it was the lost kingdom of Atlantis. He made himself a water-tight home in one of the palaces and lived there, studying the records and devices of the race’s marvelous wisdom. From the books and records, he learned ways of teaching me to live under the ocean, drawing oxygen from the water and using all the power of the sea to make me wonderfully strong and swift. By training and a hundred scientific secrets, I became what you see — a human being who lives and thrives under the water.

–Aquaman

Is the Great Sea Poisonous?

As he stands over Tetra’s bed at the end of Wind Waker, Ganondorf says that nothing lives in the Great Sea…


Is he being melodramatic, or is he simply stating something that everyone knows but never mentions because it’s so obvious?  

Let’s look at the evidence:

  • Link has lived on an island his entire life but can’t swim for more than twenty seconds.
  • Aside from Tetra floating beside Link at the end of the game, no other characters are shown swimming.
  • The game doesn’t allow Link to dive, even for short periods.
  • Just off the coast of Pawprint Isle, Link encounters a boat full of professional divers. They all wear heavy helmets, and their leader tells Link that nothing lives in the water.
  • No one else in the game – including Link – attempts undersea exploration. There are a few submarines scattered about, but they are abandoned and filled with monsters.  
  • Lenzo (the Picto Box guy) refers to Link’s home on Outset Island as “a small fishing village,” but there are no fish or nets – or even any boats – anywhere on the island.
  • There is a surprising lack of fish motifs on buildings, interior decoration, and clothing.
  • No one ever gives Link a fishing rod.
  • The Rito are the descendants of the Zora. They were granted wings by some higher power because the Zora apparently could not survive in the ocean.
  • As established in Twilight Princess, Gorons can breathe underwater (or perhaps don’t need to breathe underwater); but, with the exception of a few traveling merchants, Link never sees any of them.  
  • Despite having a strong seafaring culture, Bokoblins die when they hit the water.
  • The only creatures that Link encounters on the Great Sea are monsters or demigods.  
  • Gulls fly above the water, but they do not float on it, and Link cannot dive into or otherwise touch the water when he takes control of one with a Hyoi Pear.
  • When Link frightens the crabs commonly found on beaches, they hide by running into the grass or burrowing into the ground, not by jumping into the water.

I’m tempted to conclude that Ganondorf is right, and that nothing can live in the Great Sea. Aside from being a matter of keeping the game mechanics manageable, what purpose does this serve? Why would the water of the Great Sea be poisonous?

Drawvember 2012

Day 20: Dream Job

Marine Biologist/Undersea Explorer. I just wanna hang out with sea creatures all day, is that too much to ask?

(The diving suit’s not very realistic, and I’m not sure if cuttlefish, octopus and jellyfish would even be found in the same waters, but accuracy took a back seat to fantasy here. It is a dream job.)

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Take a deep dive down to the ocean floor with in the new giant-screen film Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean, now playing in 3D and 2D at the LeFrak Theater!

Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of pioneering undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau, teams with marine biologist Holly Lohuis to take audiences on a marine journey where they’ll see more than 30 different species of marine animals.

See arrow crabs gracefully parachute down to the bottom of the sea where sea cucumbers feed on organic debris. Get up close to a coral reef to meet its extraordinary denizens, like giant clams, sea anemones, and lionfish. And learn about the amazing adaptions all these animals have developed to survive and thrive.

Watch the trailer: 

Check showtimes and get your tickets today!