underpricing

Le me, surfin’ the web : “Oh DeviantArt released their new Commisions portal… let’s check it out! WAIT WHAT DID I JUST SEE? Are they out of their minds?

Lemme translate those pricing tiers for you DeviantArt.

  • $0.02 - $0.37
  • $0.38 - $1.24
  • $1.25 - $3.12
  • $3.13 -  $12.49
  • $12.50+

Way to encourage artists to underprice their work, DA! And I’m not even sure “underprice” is a strong enough word for that.

Oh and let’s not forget they’re taking a 20% commission on everything you “earn” (hahahaha) with their commissions widget. I wasn’t too fond of that but I thought “okay I guess you’re kinda paying for a service?”.

But this, this is just too much. See, I don’t really care about artists who choose to set low prices. It’s their decision, and I used to do it as well.

What I do care about, however, is the fact that more and more artists feel like they HAVE to underprice their work. As if you were being greedy for wanting more than 10 dollars for a piece you worked on for several days! 

No, you don’t and you aren’t. Your art, your work, your prices.

But when one of the biggest art websites, one I’ve be using for 7 years, deliberately worsens the situation, then it becomes a problem.

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[EDIT: Had I known this would get so many notes, I would have made some things clearer. So here are some details, because some people apparently thought this post was some kind of hoax.

I hope that if one of you guys has doubts about all this, you’ll check the original post, find this edit and avoid calling me names for no reason (it actually happened LOLOLOL).


First, this is the link to DA’s commissions page: http://www.deviantart.com/commissions/. Some people got it mixed up with the Prints Shop, which, strangely enough, has much more reasonable price ranges.

Second, those prices are not in dollars, they’re in DA points, DeviantArt’s virtual currency, in which 80 points = 1 dollar.

Oh and one last detail, you CAN actually change DA points you earned from commissions into real money, just check the “Earnings” page on DA.

Also here’s a thing I wrote about why I blame DA and not the artists who choose to charge low prices.]

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[EDIT #2: DA’s asking for feedback here: http://sta.sh/02dr2v2uwhiv]

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Farming in the Sky

[…] The future of farming is looking up—literally, and in more ways than one: There are grow towers, rooftops, and industry talk of Waterworld-style “plant factories” in futuristic floating cities. And this vertical movement is happening for a variety of reasons. For one, by prioritizing localized operations, it offers a remedy to the mounting economic difficulties that independent farmers face when otherwise so easily underpriced by Big Ag. But more importantly, it’s rising out of environmental concerns—space, soil health, climate change, vital ecosystems decimated by monoculture. According to the professor of environmental health sciences Dickson Despommier in his article “The Vertical Farm: Reducing the Impact of Agriculture on Ecosystem Function and Services,” we should expect over the next 50 years for the human population to reach 8.6 billion, requiring an additional growing area “roughly the size of Brazil.”

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Images: [x]

Big ask time for folks. So, a friend brought an artist to my attention. This individual has a lot of talent and ability, but is charging for the price of like a cup of coffee at starbucks. And, it kills me. I want to say something to the artist, but at the same time, I kinda want to mind my own business. I’m mostly concerned about the artist getting what is fair, and not being taken advantage of. And, by fair, I know that even then the art (and time, etc) is worth more than than the asking price, but client base sometimes dictates what we can reasonably charge within the communities we service. I don’t know if its my place to send the person an unsolicited ask to inform them. What do you think?

So, in a way, I suppose this is a bit of a public service announcement: Don’t undercharge for work! I hate to see anyone taken advantage of and not paid what they are worth! I don’t care if it affects the overall value of all the artists’ work, I care about respecting talent and ability, and propping up all my fellow artists. 

anonymous asked:

if they don't want to sell their art for the prices listed why can't they just not use that function? people did it before I don't know how its encouraging people to under price their work

It’s encouraging people to underprice their work because it makes it seem like 1000+ DA points  (=$12.50) is the upper range of prices for art commissions, when it is absolutely not (it is actually extremely cheap).

Coming from such a huge art website, it is extremely irresponsible to make such prices seem like the norm to artists and commissioners (especially those who are new to the art market and therefore ignorant of the usual prices).

Besides, what’s the logic behind prices tiers like “$0.02 to  $0.37” and “$0.38 to $1.24”? Is art so cheap that a few pennies will actually make a difference when looking for an artist to hire?

Of course people are free not to use that system, but I believe DeviantArt, with the influence they have on young artists, shouldn’t promote such ridiculous prices.

I can see where they’re going with this though ; it’s just like those micro-transactions things with mobile games. Cheaper art means less hesitation for the commissioners, which means more transactions for DA, and more profit. \o/

Sorry I wrote a lot (again). But I love DA and I’m terribly disappointed if they’re really taking this direction. 

I hate how many people underprice their artwork. ( →_→)

I understand that some people are desperate for any kind of earnings for very valid reasons, which is why they don’t charge a lot even for complex pieces, but it’s not good for the community as it reduces the overall value of art. 

And this part is more personal but it also diminishes the chances of less skilled people getting any commission offers. I don’t dare call myself an artist, but I’d hoped I could earn some money towards my studies through commissions… However, if someone much better than me charges so little for their work, I guess I’m not good enough to do commissions at all. I can feel the remains of my self-esteem crumbling away. (´;ω;`)

The future of farming is looking up—literally, and in more ways than one: There are grow towers, rooftops, and industry talk of Waterworld-style “plant factories” in futuristic floating cities. And this vertical movement is happening for a variety of reasons. For one, by prioritizing localized operations, it offers a remedy to the mounting economic difficulties that independent farmers face when otherwise so easily underpriced by Big Ag. But more importantly, it’s rising out of environmental concerns—space, soil health, climate change, vital ecosystems decimated by monoculture. According to the professor of environmental health sciences Dickson Despommier in his article “The Vertical Farm: Reducing the Impact of Agriculture on Ecosystem Function and Services,” we should expect over the next 50 years for the human population to reach 8.6 billion, requiring an additional growing area “roughly the size of Brazil.”

Since I’m well above my 2mill goal before Plague conquest, I’ve made it my mission to buy underpriced teardrop jewellery and hike up the selling price.

Brought the price of the Teardrop Lapis Lazuli Choker back to 300kt, There was only one Teardrop Ruby Choker, so obviously I grabbed that and put it up for like 700kt. 

I’m either going to really regret this or be really proud by the end of the day.

HOW SMALL SHOPS WORK

Pici Bici exists for about three and a half years already, and in this time we progressed from being a fixed gear specific shop to a collective that can help you out with any kind of wishes and demands concerning bikes. Be it road, cyclocross, touring or mountain bikes, we try to make your dream come true, no matter how complicated it can get.

Some might think that building a bike from scratch is a simple process that happens over night, and sure, it can also go down like that, but if you want something specific, prepare yourself for some delays and complications. The ability to order underpriced stuff from one of the big online bicycle retailers and getting it to your doorstep in a couple of days has distanced the customer from the reality of how small shops like ours work. As much as we would like to be able to get the stuff as fast as possible and sell it to you as low price as possible, we have to work with official dealers, and in a small country like Slovenia that can be a pain in the ass. Emails without replies, bad margins, poor stock and even poorer service causes the whole process to take longer than expected. But despite all the complications and waiting, the end result is a bike that is built specifically for you and will serve your purpose in the best possible way, and that’s something that you’ll never be able to get from a factory built bike. 

Patience always pays off, and you can be sure that we’ll do the best we can to make your dream bike come true in the shortest possible time. 

via TechCrunch

The real estate market is bouncing back from the recession, which means house flipping shows are back on HGTV and investors are having a harder time finding underpriced properties. RealtyHop, which was developed by the team behind the Y Combinator-backed RentHop, wants to make it easier for investors to find these kinds of properties. For now, the service only focuses on New York, though.

Investing in real estate means you likely want to rent the unit out, too. But if you’re looking to invest in a New York condo or co-op, figuring out how much rent you can charge can be difficult.

Chances are, after all, that the turnover in a popular building is relatively low, so you can’t compare rents from a few years ago with today’s market rate. Because RealtyHop has a trove of rental data through RentHop, combined with information about a building’s locations, amenities, size and other factors, it can still predict what the sublet revenue would be.

“We use data from our rental site and take into account both the building location, amenities, size, and other factors, but we know every building is a little different and we’re constantly tweaking to get more accuracy,” RentHop co-founder Lee Lin tells me.

To figure out whether a unit is priced right — and maybe even under its market value, the service looks at metrics like cap rates (that is, the measure of the net income as a percentage of the purchase price), financing, tax benefits and board restrictions (which can often be an issue when it comes to New York condos and co-ops).

Lin stresses that investors obviously still have to do their own due diligence. “We don’t make any assumptions about vacancy rates, maintenance, and closing costs, because these can vary greatly depending on the buyer and unit,” he said.

“I guess there is a bit of a bargain bin mentality (although I’m not sure I like that moniker), where not everything in the bargain bin is a good buy,” Lin said. “But for those willing to sift through some junk, they may find a great deal.”

Lin tells me that while the service is currently only available in New York, the plan is to take it to other cities next year once the company has amassed enough data about the housing market in these cities to ensure it can give its users accurate information.

https://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/screenshot-2015-05-20-at-08-42-33.png?w=738
New Post has been published on Stock Markets Daily

New Post has been published on http://www.stockmarketsdaily.com/is-lyondellbasell-industries-n-v-underpriced-nyselyb/15023/

Is LyondellBasell Industries N.V. Underpriced? (NYSE:LYB)

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We look at LyondellBasell Industries N.V. (NYSE:LYB) a company in the Basic Materials industry which lately stock market players have been interested in, to assess if it provides value for investors considering buying or selling it. Currently LyondellBasell Industries N.V. is trading at $101.10 after moving down -0.35% in the previous day of trading. [Trend Analysis]

LYB is trading with a trailing 12 month P/E multiple of 11.62 and an estimated forward P/E multiple of 10.20. The stock has an estimated 5 year annual growth of 5.19% and a PEG multiple of 2.24.

Rather than the usual Price to Earnings (P/E) multiple method, we use a slightly different method to assess if LyondellBasell Industries N.V. is potentially a value buy for investors, the PEG ratio (P/E to growth). This PEG multiple takes into account the expected long term growth in earnings of the company rather than merely the growth for one earnings period ahead as forward P/E does.

That is to say, P/E simply doesn’t account for the long term prospects of LYB. As a rule of thumb, a stock with a PEG of between 0 and 1 is usually considered to be underpriced, between 1 and 2 to be at fair value and over 2 to be overpriced. Based on the PEG ratio of LYB being 2.24, we consider LyondellBasell Industries N.V. to likely be overpriced.

This analysis means that value buyers who do not currently hold LyondellBasell Industries N.V. (NYSE:LYB) should not consider buying and investors currently holding the stock should consider selling.

The mean analyst 12 month target price for LyondellBasell Industries N.V. (NYSE:LYB) is currently $109.80 or 8.61% above the current price. Additionally, the stock has been as high as $115.40 and as low as $70.06 in the last 52 weeks. Analysts are estimating that LYB will report earnings per share of $2.29 next quarter.

First poster in the Honest Ads series. More coming in the following weeks.
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People either don’t know about either don’t care how our cheap fashion garments are produced. The ridiculously low prices makes us forget that it can only be this cheap on the expense of people making them. But what if clothes are advertised as they are really made? Would you still buy them?

From today onwards I launch a year mission of not buying clothes from brands that works with cild labour or sweatshops. I refuse to fuel an industry that is built on abusing others. Even if they claim to have a worker protection program it’s more for westerners to easy their concerns than to really solve problems. And sadly Gap is just one of the many.

Want to feel shit next time when you buy ridiculously underpriced garments?See John Oliver’s sum-up on this topic.

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