underground media

A Troubling Trend in Cancellations: Are Inclusive Shows in Danger?

Rosewood,” “The Get Down,” “Sense8,” “Pitch,” “East Los High,” “Sweet/Vicious,” “Underground,” “American Crime.”

These are all shows that were canceled recently. Notice a pattern?

They all had non-white and/or non-male leads or ensemble casts. Often the main creative voices behind the scenes were not necessarily what most showrunners are — white men. The programs listed above were all very different from each other in tone and execution, but they were the kind of programs that, from an inclusion standpoint, Hollywood leaders have repeatedly said they want to make.

The industry did make those shows, and now they’re all gone.

I haven’t crunched the numbers on this, and let me be clear, I am a fan of crunching the numbers when it comes to matters of inclusion and diversity (or the lack of it that is still the hallmark of too many segments of the TV industry). Variety writes stories like this all the time — including this year and last year and lots of other times — and we’ll continue to monitor and digest the numbers that come out from various guilds and from our own data-gathering efforts.

So, given my penchant for numbers, charts and data when it comes to these issues, I am fully aware that one anecdotal list does not prove anything definitively. Lots of shows get canceled every year, especially in spring and early summer, when the networks are clearing the decks for their next few rounds of acquisitions. If someone wanted to make a counter-argument, they most certainly could do so by mentioning that “Last Man Standing” and “The Odd Couple,” two shows with white male leads, were also canceled in recent weeks. WGN America didn’t just cancel “Underground,” it also canceled the predominantly white “Outsiders.”

But there’s still reason to be worried.

Having written about these issues for a very long time, here are a couple of truths I learned the hard way: Hollywood is way too quick to pat itself on the back for the smallest and most overdue steps forward when it comes to diversity, inclusion and representation — and the industry is far, far too quick to let the backsliding begin. And when that backsliding does begin (as it has many times in the past), many who mouth easy platitudes — instead of doing the real work of increasing the diversity of the industry — very easily and even reflexively turn a blind eye to the return to the status quo. (If that status quo was ever even seriously challenged — and at too many networks and studios, it is not. Still.)

Many of us who observe the TV scene have noted that its recent expansions — which have gotten us within shouting distance of 500 scripted shows per year — have led to the existence of many more TV shows created by non-white, female and LGBTQ writer/producers. This is one of the best things about the last few years — the explosion and expansion of points of view, protagonists, subjects and styles. Seeing shows led, in front of and behind the cameras, by men and women who reflect the world we live in was both a relief and a beginning — it was not the end of institutional sexism and racism, but the start of an era that had tentatively begun to right of decades of bias, blindness, arrogance and neglect.

But there was always an undercurrent of worry when many of us celebrated the TV industry’s (very incomplete) progress, as it started the process of truly expanding its worldviews and creative rosters. That progress is non-existent or weak in some quarters, and inconsistent in others, for starters. Beyond that, for some time, many of us have been worried that, if Peak TV were ever to begin contracting, that the shows created by non-white, female and LGBTQ creators — especially the newer entrants into the mix — would be the first ones shown the door.

Two years ago, NPR’s Linda Holmes began to sound that alarm, and since then, it’s been picked up by many other critics, fans and TV writers. As Holmes put it then, “If there is to be a contraction that works to the benefit of the industry and the audience at large, it can’t come from cutting off newcomers and telling them we’re full.”

I agree. And for all I know, TV is still expanding. Maybe the quest for inclusion and better representation in Hollywood will pick up steam (though the media’s ongoing coverage of this topic says that, in many regards, that’s not occurring).

But this recent spate of cancellations still worries me, I must admit. Especially in these troubled times, when it’s more important than ever to reinforce views of America that are forward-looking, inclusive and tolerant. I do know that there are men and women in this industry who care deeply about these matters. I often wonder, frankly, if there will ever be enough of them to counteract the entrenched pressures that led to decades of lingering inequality.

I love TV, but it’s an industry that so often relies on — and reverts to — bad habits. The industry’s progress in these vital arenas is patchy and incomplete. That’s one way of saying that I certainly don’t want to see a rerun of where we were a decade ago.

Source: VARIETY

youtube

Este Lamborghini Huracan de 3000cv acaba de batir el record en ½ milla alcanzando una velocidad de 403km/h

Lo ha conseguido la empresa Underground Racing, y sin modificaciones estéticas, el coche por fuera parece totalmente normal.

En solo 800 metros se ha puesto a más de 400km/h O_o

variety.com
A Troubling Trend in Cancellations: Are Inclusive Shows in Danger?
“Rosewood,” “The Get Down,” “Sense8,” “Pitch,” “East Los High,” “Sweet/Vicious,” “Underground,” “American Crime.” These are all shows that were canceled recently. Notice a pattern? They all had non…
By Maureen Ryan

“Having written about these issues for a very long time, here are a couple of truths I learned the hard way: Hollywood is way too quick to pat itself on the back for the smallest and most overdue steps forward when it comes to diversity, inclusion and representation — and the industry is far, far too quick to let the backsliding begin. And when that backsliding does begin (as it has many times in the past), many who mouth easy platitudes — instead of doing the real work of increasing the diversity of the industry — very easily and even reflexively turn a blind eye to the return to the status quo. (If that status quo was ever even seriously challenged — and at too many networks and studios, it is not. Still.)”

But there was always an undercurrent of worry when many of us celebrated the TV industry’s (very incomplete) progress, as it started the process of truly expanding its worldviews and creative rosters. That progress is non-existent or weak in some quarters, and inconsistent in others, for starters. Beyond that, for some time, many of us have been worried that, if Peak TV were ever to begin contracting, that the shows created by non-white, female and LGBTQ creators — especially the newer entrants into the mix — would be the first ones shown the door.

Two years ago, NPR’s Linda Holmes began to sound that alarm, and since then, it’s been picked up by many other critics, fans and TV writers. As Holmes put it then, “If there is to be a contraction that works to the benefit of the industry and the audience at large, it can’t come from cutting off newcomers and telling them we’re full.”

"against mediocrity, against marginalization"

Just read this awesome piece by Aaron Cometbus and it made me feel less alone. I really wish people took underground press -specifically fanzines and zines- more seriously. As Cometbus so brilliantly puts it:

Fanzines have become cult items when they were once part of the bigger conversation and the larger body of literature. They’ve become fetish objects, and, in the process, have come to be undervalued and underestimated even by those who claim to champion them- and by many people who put them out!.. For the person who grew up with fanzines, in the current understanding of the word, fanzines are something personal, something marginal, of interest only to young punks or luddites who worship things small and handmade. They appeal to, and are intended for, a very limited audience. The idea that the average person might be intrigued by something unfamiliar, interesting-looking and cheap, and be willing to give it a try - that idea has been lost.”- Aaron Cometbus, March 2011

A Call To Arms or “against mediocrity, against marginalization.”

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DoD 1 year celebration | 60 Days, 60 Singers

Day 22: Doro Pesch
Born: June 3rd, 1964 (Germany)

Bands/Projects: Snakebite (1980 – 1982); Warlock (1983 – 1989); Doro (1989 – present)

Collaborations: Beast (1981); Die Krupps (1997); Powergod (2001); Mägo de Oz (2001, 2006); Motörhead (2001, 2011); U.D.O. (2002, 2012); Killer (2003); Destruction (2005); Dezperadoz (2006); Twister Sister (2006); After Forever (2007); Saxon (2007); Tarja (2008); Axxis (2009); Dio Disciples (2011); Girlschool (2011); Grave Digger (2011); Krypteria (2011); Sister Sin (2011); Tankard (2012); Liv Kristine (2014); Angra (2015); Amon Amarth (2016)

Curiosities:
Doro started her career in garage bands in native Düsseldorf underground scene and achieved media visibility and some commercial success with Warlock in the 1980s.

♦ In the 1980s the presence of women in rock, and in particular in heavy metal bands, was usually considered by press and fans more for glamour and sexual exploitation than for the musicianship showed. Doro Pesch was one of the few exceptions; her qualities as vocalist and songwriter in Warlock, her commitment in promoting their music and her avoidance of posturing as a sex symbol won the respect of a solid fan base in the expanding European metal scene of that period.

Both fans, press and internet community often referred to Doro with the moniker Metal Queen, to show their respect and deference for the uninterrupted career of the German singer on the heavy metal scene.

Her career and commitment are held in high esteem by the new generation of female heavy metal singers.

Doro is also known for her duets performed both live and in studio with other singers and musicians of the metal scene, whom she has befriended in her long career.

Personal life:
Doro Pesch has always been very reserved and careful in protecting her privacy off-stage. She consciously renounced a family and children in order to dedicate all of her time to her musical career and her fans.

Doro is vegan. Her stage clothes are handmade, following models she designs and using synthetic materials which imitate leather after the singer’s adhesion to PETA. She also supports the no-profit organization Terre des Femmes, which helps women and girls in need all over the world. Doro has been a trained Thai boxer, a sport that she started practicing in 1995. She still enjoys graphic arts and painting in her limited free time.

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WUFF #5 has begun! Head down to Poolside Gallery (2nd Floor, 100 Arthur’s St.) today during business hours to check out installation work by Freya Olafson, Hannah Piper Burns, Michael Robinson and Adan de la Garza!
@videopool #wuff #wuff5 #winnipeg #underground #film #festival #filmfestival #installation #media #arts #mediaarts #canada #canadian #gallery #poolside (at Video Pool Media Arts Centre)

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The Bravest Human (Astra/Alex)

Ever since Kara became Supergirl, she’s been in near-constant danger. Alex hates to admit it, but she isn’t coping very well with her new responsibilities to keep her sister safe. Astra knows how that feels. On AO3


Alex stumbled out onto her apartment’s tiny balcony at three in the morning, a glass of whisky in her hand. Her entire body felt like lead. She should really have come home and immediately gone to bed, but she knew she wouldn’t sleep. Hadn’t slept in days. Probably wouldn’t sleep until they figured out what Maxwell Lord was planning and took him down. Kara’s safety hung in the balance and she’d be damned if she’d sleep when she could be doing something to help. But Hank had sent her home. Ordered her to get some sleep. 

Tipping back the rest of her whisky, she briefly wished Kara were there. To reprimand her for being awake. To reprimand her for drinking too much. To reprimand her for the abysmal state of her apartment. Never mind. Kara didn’t need to know about any of this. She had too much to worry about without having to worry about Alex as well. 

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anonymous asked:

I'd love to see something about Karamatsu being good enough at guitar/singing that he goes out busking a lot and makes decent money. He even has a bit of an underground following on social media that he of course has no idea about. He keeps busking a secret from his brothers because he thinks they will tease him and they have actually all walked by him in the act at least once but since he is always ignored by them they don't notice.

Ohhhh that sounds lovely. I can definitely see him doing that. Maybe one day Todomatsu sees his brother on social media and his immediate response is “what the fuck.” Todo is the reason Kara realizes he actually has fans, and Kara probably cries like a dweeb because he can’t believe people actually like him. Then Totty insists on being his manager (before Choro can get his grubby hands on him and try catering him to the otaku community somehow) and they start selling merch (Totty tries to make it legitimately nice stuff, but then the sequined pants sell better, and the knockoff shades, and the shirts with Kara’s face on it, and he has to accept that Kara’s fanbase is, sadly, as painful as his brother himself). Kara is just kinda in disbelief but then Totty sets up a scheduled performance and a lot of people show up and afterwards they get to talk to him and everyone just loves him and he feels so overwhelmed by it and it makes him so happy.

(Totty is secretly pretty glad to see his brother so happy, and to have earned it all by himself.) 

anonymous asked:

So if a group of black people beat you up just for being white thats no racism? When a black human resource manager doesnt employ you bc you are white its not racism? Man these white guilt people like you are so hilariously sad. Everyone can be discriminated against. Just bc "white priviledge" black people can now pull the race card in every situation without race being relevant.

Please unfollow me if what I say irritates you this much, or at least refrain from sending me anonymous hate about it. I can understand not being aware of or educated enough on racism, as it’s not something we (as white people) are taught about or have to notice growing up, but actively denying it and choosing to cyber bully someone online with no real contention or attempt to educate them, that’s not okay.

You can discriminate against white people (ie your example of choosing not to hire them, but this is not likely because due to racism white people hold more positions of power) but that is out of personal choice and preference, not from a systematic oppression whereby we have been taught to fear POC, or believe that they are inferior to us. Racism is long engrained within our culture, and has very real world consequences. Reverse racism doesn’t exist, because we hold political, economic and institutional power. As well as a deep rooted mentality, there is a governing structure to hold it up.

“Until people of color colonize, dominate and enslave the populations of the planet in the name of “superiority,” create standards of beauty based on their own colored definition, enact a system where only people of color benefit on a large-scale, and finally pretend like said system no longer exists, there is no such thing as reverse racism.”

Prejudice directed at white people doesn’t have the weight of institutional oppression behind it. We can be hurt by prejudice, but it is not the same thing. I am not going to be killed for being out on the street due to my skin colour. (I might because I’m a girl, but that is a different story). Some more fun facts:

• The median wealth gap difference between a White family and a Black family is $80,000.
• 1 in 9 Black children has an incarcerated parent compared to 1 in 57 White children.
• A White man who has been to jail is still more likely to get a job than a Black man who hasn’t. Let that sink in…

Things you can google to learn more: Black/White/Hispanic wealth gap, redlining, “White flight,” in-school segregation, workplace discrimination, etc etc etc.

Look at the way our media responds to violence.
Black = thug, criminal, deserved to be shot
Arabic = terrorist, get rid of him
White = misunderstood, lonely, depressed, his poor family, he was such a sweet kid

There are so many more reasons, but I don’t think I’m the person who should be telling you. I can’t speak from experience, because I sit in a very privileged position and there would be millions and millions of examples of everyday racism (I’m pretty sure there’s a blog on this if you want to check it out) that I’ve never thought about, because I’ll never be the victim of it.

The tutor in my Race in America class was telling us a story about how though she and her friend had babies at the same time, they had to raise them slightly differently. My tutor, a white woman, told her child that were she ever in trouble she should go find a police officer. Her friend, a POC, told her child to never approach cops, and try to avoid them if possible. This was 12 years ago. I was shocked, because I didn’t realise the police brutality was so common then, as the media (well, not mainstream media but underground levels like Tumblr and Twitter) have only brought it to light in recent years. I, in my white ignorance, genuinely thought that Ferguson, Cleveland and Baltimore were horrible anomalies. They weren’t. They are the norm, and the result of institutionalised racism. The KKK is still alive and well, still functioning today (check out their website if you’d like) and many members of the police force are members of the klan too. There is no “pulling the race card”, it’s a legitimate obstacle that impacts everyday life, racial barriers are very much real and POC have every right to discuss it (and we should too). If they didn’t, nothing would ever change. The very fact that I (as a white person) can discuss this and be met with support but if I were a POC it would be seen as complaining or “pulling the race card” as you said, shows the position of privilege and safety I’m in. This is something we all need to acknowledge and talk about so that things can move forward.

I’m answering this on my phone so I can’t remember what else you said, but I really do encourage you to do more research on this and gain a better understanding.