un ngo

jackscrutchie  asked:

“You make me feel so happy just to be around you. The way you smile, your beautiful laugh, the way you look at me, It brings me such joy.” With JackCrutchie. ❤

I was going to write some nice, short one-shot. And now we’ve got this 6,000+ behemoth. Whatever, it was fun. Hope y’all like this one!

Also, shout out to one of my greatest friends up at college, who sat me down and helped me come up with a realistic plan for Crutchie’s life–which, is basically a combination of her plans and her friend’s plans–and then proceeded to threaten me if I didn’t let her read this after it was finished.  


Crutchie had a plan. It was the perfect plan and he wouldn’t allow anything to get in the way of him achieving his dreams. Nothing would stop him; he wouldn’t let it. When Crutchie had started college, he had fallen in love with the anthropology class that he had taken to cover some liberal arts requirement that his adviser had informed him was mandatory. Crutchie had immediately changed majors and never looked back. Suddenly, Crutchie knew exactly what he wanted to do: he would major in anthropology and he would find a way to work and identify bodies, in order to connect them back to their families.

He knew exactly how he would get to that point. First, he would graduate with his bachelor’s degree in anthropology and two minors in biology and chemistry. He would get his masters in biological anthropology at, either Michigan State or UT Knoxville. Through that degree, he would be able to pursue either contemporary mass grave excavation, or stable isotope identification methods. Both would allow him to work with mass graves. After studying their programs, Crutchie had felt as if those schools offered what he needed to achieve his goal. Once he had gotten his masters, Crutchie hoped to work or volunteer, either through the UN or an NGO to excavate mass graves. Ideally, he hoped to work in Afghanistan, but he knew that he would be content anywhere. As long as he was helping these people, long dead, be connected to their posterity. Maybe Crutchie would even get a job at the Smithsonian or the Museum of Natural History in New York. He was open to that avenue, as well, so long as he had worked with mass grave excavations, in the end.

Really, Crutchie had everything planned out, and he could not afford to be distracted from his goal and life-long pursuit.

Which was why Jack Kelly’s appearance into his life was not initially welcome. 

Keep reading

Why You Should Reconsider Being Premed

You know, life has a way of surprising you and turning everything upside down when you least expect it. When I was 9 years old my mother gave me a copy of Mosby’s Medical Encyclopedia, and I would read it every single day. I’d take it to school, read it at the park, pull it out when a big fancy medical word popped up on the news, etc. I was fascinated with medicine at a young age. This was probably destiny, though. I have five doctors in my family; an orthopedic surgeon, maternal-fetal medicine specialist, dermatologist and two psychiatrists, one of whom was my father. I have been in ORs, watched the broken be cut open and put together again, knew how to suture before I entered middle school, memorized all those damn acronyms when I should have been studying for the SAT, etc. I still have that same medical encyclopedia.

Today, I find myself a university student majoring in Anthropology and Communication Disorders, and pursuing all the required courses for medical school. My GPA is a 3.8, I’ve done the obligatory volunteer work, tutored Deaf and Deaf/Blind kids, worked as a peer and academic counselor, got the EMT license, organized the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners for the homeless, done enough research to fill a textbook and I feel nothing. The passion, the spark has faded. The more I work in the hospital, the more physicians I shadow and the more I read about the state of healthcare and medicine worldwide, the more disenchanted I become. You read all the surveys asking physicians if they’d pursue medicine if they could do it all over again, and, on average, less than 50% say they would do so. In fact, the average is 41%. However, is this as much of a surprise as it sounds? Is it shocking that there are articles called “$1 Million Mistake: Becoming a Doctor” out in the world?

Everything I thought I loved about medicine has become dull and gray. The magic has been cast aside by the harsh light of reality. It takes around a decade beyond your BA to become a physician (4 years medical school + 1 year optional internship + 3-6 year residency + 1-3 year fellowship), you graduate medical school with around $160,000 in debt, start earning a decent salary roughly 10-12 years after the rest of your friends from university have already secured their careers and promotions, spend almost half your day doing paperwork as opposed to hands-on patient care, often have time with your patients limited to 15 minutes, etc. BUT! This is not why we go into medicine, right? We don’t care about the time it takes, the money we may make or lose, etc. We care about the patients. We care about being compassionate healers who touch the hearts and souls of those in need, and give them hope when all seems lost. But is medical school worth it?

I’ve interviewed several healthcare professionals and medical scientists. The most miserable: physicians. The happiest and most satisfied: those who passed on medical school, or went into research. I met those who went to medical school and decided to change careers, those who dropped out of medical school, premeds who changed their mind, etc. The physician assistant was happier than the neurosurgeon, got to see his family every night, interacted with patients more often and spent less time on paperwork. The nurse knew all of her patients by name and history without having to look at a chart to remind her, commanded more respect and ran every protocol while the ER physician watched. The epidemiologist traveled to more than 9 countries, prevented the spread of over 20 infectious disease outbreaks, did more hands-on patient care than any physician I’ve ever seen and had time to do and publish research. The medical anthropologist flew to a different country every few months, built wells for clean water to prevent waterborne diseases, built health clinics in Sudan, set up rape and abuse education programs in 3 countries, wrote 3 books and had time to pursue EMT licensure, certificates in HIV/AIDS education, an MPH and raise 2 kids. The pathology assistant earns almost as much as the pathologist he worked for, did more autopsies (his preference) and has the freedom to do almost everything his superior does.

What is the point of all of this? It is not to discourage anyone from pursuing medicine, a career in healthcare, etc. It is to remind us all that medical school is not the only option. We become so fascinated with the “MD,” “DO,” ND,” etc. that we forget there is a whole world of opportunities passing us by. We stay awake until 3am reading about orgo nomenclature, watching Greys Anatomy to keep us inspired (you know you do it) to the point where we forget that reality is not the same as TV. Personally, I think reality is better, but it is also worse. Ask yourself this: Is there something more I could be doing? Could you become a nurse, physician assistant, drug researcher, Peace Corps member, medical anthropologist, health/medical interpreter, speech language pathologist/audiologist, podiatrist, forensic scientist, professor, genetic counselor, clinical herbalist, massage therapist, physical therapist, pathology assistant, chiropractor, bioethicist, public health official, epidemiologist, entrepreneur, expert in sustainable health practices, diagnostic sonographer, therapist, dietician/nutritionist, naturopath, geneticist, biotechnologist, anesthesiologist assistant, pharmacist, dentist, etc.? Do you want to join the system or change it? Do you have an idea that could change the face of healthcare, medicine and medical education? Are you putting it off for 10 years until you’re an attending with an average of 4 hours of sleep? Are you ready for the debt that comes with medical school when the very specialized career you want has a shorter and cheaper path?

Whatever you choose, you can do it. I have faith in every single one of you. You are all brilliant and have the capacity for excellence. Just be sure to educate yourselves and experience as much as you can before you commit to anything. Feel free to ask me questions. Cheers.

PS: I will be pursuing a dual degree in Linguistics and Anthropology, and becoming a conference interpreter. I plan on interpreting for human rights campaigns, the medically underserved, NGOs, the UN, EU, etc. :)

anonymous asked:

Ca esht NGO? Dua tkem dhe un nje NGO

Ngo: Non-Governmental Organisation… Nqs do krijoje e kam seriozish, do ishte shum gje e mir. Te duhet thjesht Bordi, Statuti, Noterizimi, Urdhri i gjykates, Nipti, nji ekonomist per bilancin, sigurimet shendetsore dhe shoqerore, Aftesia per te shkruar projekte te cilat do shqyrtohen ne EYF(European Youth Forum), nji zyr, shum vullnetare, strategji organizative, Shum shum Kontakte ne Civic Society, ide per aktivitete ne topics si ‘Multicultural Cohesion in Social developing environments’. And then you are all set :)

3

Waking up to the same circumstances you fell asleep to , is not easy.

I have been aware of this for the past few weeks. Dealing with this awareness I have reached out to be inspired, there is no better place to find it than the people of Bukavu for me.  

Walking across mountains with a load of heavy bananas for survival isn’t easy especially when one has to look past injustice. This woman does it, she does it because she has dreams and not doing anything will not make them come true or change her circumstances.

It’s hard, it hurts but as living beings we owe it to ourselves to keep fighting for our heart’s desires and our happiness. We owe it to ourselves to fight to wake up to better circumstances. There is beauty in pain, we have to push through the darkness to see bright light.

She is so strong, she does it alone yet many will rejoice from the fruit of her actions. 

Recuperating Memories in Jordan’s Zaatari Refugee Camp

Above: Photo by Nina Berman/NOOR

Four photographers from the distinguished Amsterdam-based photojournalism collective NOOR spent New Years in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. Located 18 miles from the Syrian border, the camp opened with just 100 families in July 2012. It now hosts around 120,000 residents, making it the second-largest refugee camp in the world. VICE’s Robert King documented life in this camp last fall, just 72 hours after the sarin gas attack in Damascus forced even more Syrians out of their homes. One of the many challenges that residents of Zaatari face is the lack of any physical evidence of memory. In most cases refugees arrive at Zaatari with just the clothes on their back, leaving behind photographs of family and loved ones. Now, these photographers are attempting to recuperate those memories and give them permanence.    Between Christmas and the fifth of January, Nina BermanAndrea BruceAlixandra Fazzina, and Stanley Greene—supported by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and Japan Emergency NGOs (JEN)—turned a large tent into a photo booth where refugees could come and have their portraits made. Refugees were asked to bring an object they cherished or, if they didn’t have anything, to bring a person they loved. A boy came wrapped in his blanket. A man brought his shisha pipe. A mother posed with her five children. In all, about 300 portraits were printed on the spot and given to people to keep.  

Continue

UN officials accused of buckling under Israeli pressure over children’s rights list
Senior UN officials in Jerusalem have been accused of caving in to Israeli pressure to abandon moves to include the state’s armed forces on a UN list of serious violators of children’s rights.

UN officials backed away from recommending that the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) be included on the list following telephone calls from senior Israeli officials. The Israelis allegedly warned of serious consequences if a meeting of UN agencies and NGOs based in Jerusalem to ratify the recommendation went ahead. Within hours, the meeting was cancelled.

“Top officials have buckled under political pressure,” said a UN source. “As a result, a clear message has been given that Israel will not be listed.”

Organisations pressing for the IDF’s inclusion on the list since the war in Gaza last summer – which left more than 500 children dead and more than 3,300 injured – include Save the Children and War Child as well as at least a dozen Palestinian human rights organisations, the Israeli rights organisation B’Tselem and UN bodies such as the children’s agency Unicef.