ukiyoe

5

MANGA: The Pre-History of Japanese Comics

“The influence of manga on international comics has grown considerably over the past two decades. The origins of manga can be traced back to the Edo Period of Japanese history (1600-1868), specifically to popular type of books using ukiyo-e, or Japanese woodblock prints. These early manga books contained humorous content and featured humans, fantastical creatures and even references to celebrities of the period.

As literacy rose in Japan throughout the 18th century (during the Edo Period) and into the 19th and early 20th Century (during the Meiji Period), this kind of illustrated novel became popular; it is from here that we actually see the first recorded use of the term “manga” to describe a words-and-picture-based story.

This title features foundational works of manga dating from the 17th to the early 20th century and presented in chronological order. It is a great resource for graphic designers and comic book artists. Japanese art lovers will also find some great works by well-known ukiyo-e artists such as Kuniyoshi Utagawa, Hokusai Katsushika and Yoshitoshi Tsukioka.” - Buy Now

4

Kimono by Liza Dalby

“In the sixteenth century, the nobility ceased to be the sole source of fashion inspiration. Playgirls (asobime) – multitalented, trendy ladies who led rather public lives (sometimes glossed as ‘courtesans’) – wore their kosode belted with long tasseled silk cords. The cords, called Nogoya obi, were woven according to a style then popular in China, roped about the hips six or seven times, and tied in a looping bow.” (Dalby 37)

“Playgirls also did their hair into Chinese chignons, initiating a fashion for women to put up their hair. In previous ages, men had been the ones to oil and arrange their tresses. Women had favored long straight locks, or perhaps a simple ponytail.” (Dalby 37)

“Late Edo fashion for women was undeniably restrictive. […] Hairstyles for women had developed into the elaborate comb-studded coiffures familiar from woodblock prints. With such a coiled oiled structure on her head, a woman couldn’t even sleep freely. Finally, the practice of applying lead- and mercury-based whitening cosmetics, originally a custom limited to the noblility, had now spread into common popularity. By the nineteenth century, being fashionable was truly hazardous to a Japanese woman’s health.” (Dalby 50)

3

On the internet there are various picture of  Star Wars’s characters drawn like  the ancient Japanese prints. I am a big fan of Japanese history and culture, so I tried to draw Kylo Ren and Rey in the manner of ukiyo-e.
Drawing Rey was simple and I took inspiration by the works of Ichito Tsuruta, but Kylo Ren was much more difficult because Adam Driver hasn’t a round face, so I tried to modify his features to make them similar to  the characters portrayed in ukiyo-e. I made Rey  like a geisha, while Kylo is inspired by the makeup of Kabuki actors.