ui-kit

Ent Design – 3/20

Rough notes to myself:

Here’s what I did in the past week:

- Sent an email to an artist asking for feedback on my back up idea. She didn’t reply, which isn’t surprising since the e-mail wasn’t coherent. The lesson here is to get feedback on e-mails before I send them. I did this with the other cold e-mails we had to send and it went better.

- Set up another chat with someone doing VR UI.

- Made a unity asset for one of the design patterns and submitted it to the Unity asset store

- Added some more patterns to xr.design.

- Set up chats with two VR companies in the next week.

Thoughts:

- Even though everyone I’ve spoken to has said that the UI kit is the way to go and that many of them would back it, I’m almost certain that it won’t get to $1k on Kickstarter, in part because I’m not sure if I want to promote it. It feels silly to send a Kickstarter project to someone when I could just send them a Google Doc or a video. Kickstarter feels like the wrong medium for sending developer tool ideas to engineers.

- That said, given all the validation, I’m pretty sure that I could just make $1k in the unity asset store by releasing UI tools, continuing to talk to developers, and doing research via xr.design.

- However, I’m not sure if I want to write that much code.

- Since I’m ultimately interested in exploring VR interactions and not in maintaining a large codebase, I think I’m going to keep hacking on these interaction assets, but do it in the context of researching what does and doesn’t work in VR. Making the world scaling asset ended up being interesting because it led to lots of other ideas for how to make something better. 

- So, instead of making a really robust library that developers could use, I think I just want to make a bunch of semi-polished examples. Releasing them becomes more like sawdust from the research, which is the actual thing that I get personal value out of.

Also:

Tyler wrote some great posts here and here. Leaving here for myself in case I ever re-read this.

Gary’s summary:

Ideas develop through dialogue.  

If you are shying away from talking to people, or if you are cutting short conversations because the first few ones you have are discouraging, you are preventing your idea from developing.  It’s easy to become discouraged when your initial conversations don’t lead to a clear answer.  But that is normal and the way forward is to keep talking to people (rather than stop talking altogether).