u.s. marshalls

1. The phony iCloud breach

The scam: Scammers reach people by phone, saying their data was hacked or breached through iCloud, Apple’s online data storage service. The scam is so effective because it sounds plausible, what with all the reports of data breaches, Business Insider notes. The initial call is a robocall, which offers to connect the prospective victim to a live person who can “help.” The individual on the phone says they can fix the problem if provided personal information (which could possibly include your Apple ID password, credit card information). The scammers will use flattery and may even an offer of a free iTunes gift card to poach your information, Apple says.

What you should do: Never share your Apple ID or temporary verification codes with anyone, Apple advises. And using two-factor identification will add an extra layer of protection to your account. If you receive an unsolicited call, hang up immediately and contact Apple directly.

2. The shady taxi lost-and-found service

The scam: You are in a hurry and forget your bag or phone in the cab. What do you do? Use a helpful service, like Yellowcabnyc.com, to locate your missing item. Sounds legit, considering it has all the vital keywords like NYC and yellow cab, right? Unfortunately, this “service” offers to locate your lost item for $47, which of course goes directly into the scammer’s pocket and your item is seemingly never retrieved, the New York Post reported.

What you should do: If you lose something in a cab, call the cab company’s garage directly first, according to the City of New York government website. If you don’t recall the name of the cab company, you can complete this form. Additionally, you can call the lost property police precincts in each borough to see if your lost item was recovered. Not in New York City? You can still apply this advice no matter where you are, just by starting with the cab company’s office.

3. Airline ticket giveaway

The scam: If you put off booking that airline ticket for summer until now, you are probably thirsting for a last-minute deal. Then you happen to see an email or post on Facebook or Craigslist offering one. All you need to do is wire cash for the ticket to a Western Union account and you are given the ticket confirmation number. Unfortunately when it’s time to travel, you find out the “ticket” you purchased doesn’t exist.

Scammers steal credit card information and purchase airline tickets, Scam Detector says. They cancel the trip for credit but retain the ticket’s confirmation number. Then they sell the ticket at a “discounted” rate on a site like Craigslist, Kijiji, Oodle or Gumtree and make the sale look legit because they provide the confirmation number.

What you should do: If you purchase an airline ticket online, make sure you go directly through the airline site or a reputable site like Expedia or Kayak. While some deals may be tempting, they are most likely too good to be true. If you purchase a fraudulent ticket, share what happened to you on social media and contact the Federal Trade Commission.

4. The bogus government grant

The scam: Score! You receive a phone call that you’ve been awarded a healthy government grant because you paid your taxes on time. All you need to do is provide your checking account information so the money can be automatically transferred to your account, but also to cover a one-time processing fee. The caller may say they are from the “Federal Grants Administration” so the call sounds legitimate, but the scam is to obtain access to your bank account.

The hallmark of this scam is that scammers usually read from a script, congratulating you for your eligibility and confirming that your processing fee can be refunded if you aren’t completely satisfied, according to the FTC. Also, the phone number will not have a caller ID, although the call may appear to be coming from Washington, D.C. Additionally, know you’ll never have to pay money for a “free” government grant.

What you should do: Hang up and report the call to the Federal Trade Commission.

5. The imaginary vacation rental

The scam: The vacation rental house looks perfect online and the price is right — but is it? Fake vacation rentals and time-share offers account for about 8% of reports to the Better Business Bureau scam tracker in 2017. Scammers may hijack an actual vacation rental ad, posing as the agent to grab your money for the rental or will fabricate a fake ad, designing a property that doesn’t even exist, the FTC says.

What you should do: Before you pay for a vacation rental, be wary of someone asking you to wire the cash to them, the FTC advises. Also, anyone who cannot connect personally because they are out of the country or demands the security deposit up front should be a red flag. Also, if the listing seems too good to be true, it probably is, the BBB says.

6. The tax bill you don’t actually owe

The scam: About 5% of the scams reported to the BBB are criminals posing as IRS agents, threatening criminal prosecution for being remiss on paying your taxes. The “agent” claims they can waive arrest if you pay a hefty fine through a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer, the IRS says. The latest version of this scam includes the scammer telling the potential victim that two certified letters were mailed to the victim but were returned as being undeliverable.

What you should do: Know that the IRS will never ask for credit or debit information over the phone or demand immediate payment without the opportunity to appeal the amount, the IRS advises. Also, hang up the phone if you are contacted by someone posing as an IRS agent, the BBB says.

7. The jury duty scam

The scam: While missing your jury summons by mail could happen, you wouldn’t be harassed by someone on the phone if you do miss your notice. Scammers typically pose as a U.S. marshall or the local police, AARP says, claiming you may be arrested because you missed jury duty. Supposedly in order to confirm the call, the caller will ask for your Social Security number and any other ID and will then offer to wipe clean the warrant for your arrest if you pay a fine in the form of a prepaid debit or gift card.

What you should do: Federal courts will never ask for personal information by phone, the United States Courts says, and will not ask for Social Security or credit card numbers. Should you receive this call, hang up immediately and contact the agency the caller claims to be calling from, typically a government agency, Sheryl Presley, Oklahoma City Police Triad coordinator told AOL says.

8. The ransom call

The scam: Typically delivered under the cloak of night, the kidnapping scam plays on your fears that a loved one was kidnapped but would be returned safely as long as a ransom is paid. Scammers reach out by phone, email or Facebook message, claiming if you don’t pay up in the hour, your loved one dies, Men’s Health reports. The reason scammers get away with this is because they pick the right hour to deliver the scary message, usually in the middle of the night, so you are too disoriented to challenge or question the call.

What you should do: First reach out to the “kidnapped victim” before you jump to any conclusions, Men’s Health suggests. Even though you may annoy your buddy with a call at 2 a.m. to make sure they’re safe, shelling out thousands of dollars in “ransom” is far more annoying. Keep in mind, the scammers may have scanned your social media to identify a connection who posted about traveling or being on vacation, CBS Boston notes. This will make it harder to verify the whereabouts of your loved one. Call 911 in the event you receive a call like this and get police involved.

9. Fraudulent telemarketing calls

The scam: Just when you thought your mobile phone was safe, scammers target you with fake telemarketing calls. You first receive an email saying telemarketers may be calling your mobile phone, playing off the rumors of a 411 mobile directory, the FCC says. The idea behind the scam is if your number is listed on the 411 service, its open to telemarketing calls which is completely untrue and would be illegal.

What you should do: Never share any personal information or data by phone with a telemarketer. Most telemarketing calls placed to your mobile phone are illegal and should be reported to the FTC. Another trick: Block the caller on your phone so at the very least they’ll have to call from another number to reach you again.

10. The “spear phishing” email

The scam: While phishing accounts for 34% of the BBB’s complaints this year, “spear phishing” is on the rise. Phishing is when a business emails you and asks to “verify” your personal information, like your Social Security number, credit card numbers or passwords. “Spear phishing” gives the scam a more personal flavor, as it appears to come from someone you know and sounds more personal, USA Today says. This approach is far more dangerous because your guard may not be up, making you more likely to fall for this scam.

What should you do: As with any scam, be cautious of any emails asking for you to click on a link, USA Today advises. Also, legitimate companies aren’t going to ask for your password, and if a “friend” sends the email, reach out separately and ask if the friend really sent that message — sometimes tiny differences in an email address are hard to spot. Also, fraudulent emails are typically fraught with typos. Be wary of links that take you to a URL that begins with “http” rather than “https,” which is more secure. Read more (7/6/17)

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Romance novels centred around black characters

It’s really hard to find romantic books featuring black women. Most popular books centred around black women are based on some sort of suffering and or abuse. Whilst it is important for their stories to be told, it is quite disheartening there is so little representation in other genres.


Until There Was You - All he was looking for was some peace and quiet. Instead, what ex-FBI agent Luke Grayson finds in the secluded cabin in the woods is a gorgeous, smoky-eyed woman…who just happens to be pointing a gun in his direction.

A Little Dare – Shelly and Dare were torn apart when Dare decided to pursue a career in the FBI.  Shelly kept her pregnancy a secret so as not to tie him down. She returns 11 years later to her home town to rekindle her relationship with the father of her son.

Taken by Storm - A handsome U.S. marshall Raphael Madison tells floral designer Simone Whitfield that he’s her live-in bodyguard for the duration of a high-profile court case. Simone discovers that sharing her home with a bodyguard stirs up a storm of longing. Soon, their closeness becomes electrifying

Tonight and Forever- Lorren Jacobs marriage ends in divorce and all she wants is to leave California behind. She returns to Texas where she meets Justin Madaris. Lorren has vowed never to give her heart to another man, but she can’t stop herself from responding to the handsome widower’s sensuous whispers of love.

The Right Kind of Trouble - Twenty year old Lauren Bailey is organized, responsible, and hyper-driven toward her goal of graduating college. She already has enough on her hands and definitely has no time for trouble. she’s not interested in that level of distraction. Until Ty. Ty opens Lauren’s mind to a world beyond the strict walls she’s built.

Forbidden - Eddy owes her life to Rhine, but she won’t risk her heart for him. As soon as she’s saved enough money from her cooking, she’ll leave this Nevada town and move to California. No matter how handsome he is, no matter how fiery the heat between them, Rhine will never be hers. Giving in for just one night might quench this longing…

Fox News host casually suggests Trump should have Snoop Dogg and Lil Bow Wow killed

  • Fox News’ Kimberly Guilfoyle had one idea on how President Donald Trump should respond to Snoop Dogg and Lil Bow Wow’s threats: Have them assassinated by U.S. marshals. 
  • On a recent edition of The Five, Guilfoyle said Trump should “Kill them.” Read more. (3/19/2017 11:01 AM)
I just wanted to make a post about Terre Haute...

and what it could be like.

Terre Haute is a HIGH security prison, it has a max security federal correctional institute, a medium security federal correctional institute, and a low security prison camp. The maximum security facility houses federal death row inmates. ( A special confinement unit is where most death row inmates are held. It has been accused of having inadequate conditions, and also that those on Death Row are routinely denied basic medical care, mental health services, and are subjected to noise that causes sleep deprivation.


The super-max cell is similar to this one shown above. They are by themselves, their meals are pushed through a slot, there is NO recreation but they’re allowed out of their tiny cells 3 times a week into cages.

The Death Chamber inside of Terre Haute Penitentiary. 

Executions are performed here but may be moved to a state where it is legal if it is more convenient to the family and victims. 

Between 3-12 hours before death a last meal is given to the inmate cooked by prison staff (alcohol is not an option). The inmate wears khaki pants, a white t-shirt, white socks, and slip on shoes to the gurney.

Up to 8 victims(or members of the victims family) can watch the execution, also the inmate can choose a spiritual advisor, 3 family members, and 2 attorneys. They are all located outside the execution room and can watch through glass. Ten members of the media are also allowed.

Last words are an option given to the condemned, a signal is then given by a U.S. marshal, and an executioner starts administering the lethal drugs. Time of Death is recorded, and almost always occurs early in the morning. 


short and simple but just wanted to give some info on it. 

We were playing a mod called Deadlands which is a kind of steampunk western setting. All of us except for the DM and one other guy were incredibly new to the RPG format so it was a bit of a slog at first. One member of the party was a U.S. Marshal and wanted to track down some leads at the sheriff’s office. This would be the first character dialogue of the game.

DM: Alright, you enter the sheriff’s office. It’s dimly lit, smaller than you would have imagined too. They have a single cell at the back and a telegraph machine behind the sheriff’s desk which is to the right of the doorway. The sheriff is sitting behind his desk and looks up as you enter.

NPC: Haven’t seen you boys before. What can I do for ya?

*Pause*

DM: Well what do you want to ask him? And remember, you’re in character.

*Pause*

Marshal: Uh…so mister sheriff sir…?

*Our entire party lost it*

Camp Crystal Lake

Title: Camp Crystal Lake

Summary:  Sam and Dean hunt a monster at a summer camp.

Author:  Dean’s Dirty Little Secret

Characters:  Sam Winchester x female reader, Dean Winchester

Word Count:  2737

Warnings:  nsfw, canon typical violence, mentions of blood, some smut, explicit language

Author’s Notes:  This was written for @revwinchester Birthday Challenge. My prompt was camp counselor. Italics indicate a flashback. I started writing this in January on Friday the 13th and my dash was flooded with Jared (and his floofy hair) from his Friday the 13th movie. I couldn’t get it out of my head, so I just went with it.

Originally posted by camp-crystallake

Keep reading

U.S. Marshals escorting the extremely brave Ruby Bridges, 6 years old, to school in 1960. This Courageous young girl is known as the first African American child to attend an all-white elementary school in the South.

  • tv show: main character trips out of a tim hortons toonies and loonies falling out of their hand poutine lays chips bag on the ground character wobbles over towards car with alberta license plate before they get in they see some one and yell "you're a u.s. marshal, you don't have any jurisdiction up here." climbs into car flicks radio on to canada's top 40 countdown drives off passing two girls making out under a maple leaf flag with a goose chasing after the car wideshot of the canadian rockies a faint giggle off camera can be heard from emily andras herself
  • americas: yup this definitely takes place in ye ol' u.s.a.
  • what i say: i'm fine
  • what i mean: how does the justice system of the harry potter world function? are there jails besides azkaban for smaller crimes, or does one have to deal with crushing terror for peeing on a bush? why was barty crouch allowed to be involved in his own son's trial? is there any form of ethical training that goes into the ministry? also, how does azkaban work? are there human guards as well as dementors, or can dementors function well enough to feed prisoners or take them to visitation areas? if there are wizards or aurors who work within the prison system do they have to deal with constant feeling of dread from their coworker dementor jim just hanging out? what is the fugitive protocol? why were there no clear visible figures trying to find sirius, just dementors around hogwarts? can dementors function the same as u.s. marshals? is that what they're a metaphor for as well as depression? how did the law enforcement of the wizarding world close a case after finding only a man's finger, how did--

February 1st, 2017

In today’s Black History they didn’t teach you in school, one in four cowboys were Black, despite the stories told in popular movies and books. In fact, it’s believed that the real “Lone Ranger” was inspired by an African American man named Bass Reeves. Reeves had been born a slave but escaped West during the Civil War where he lived in what was then known as Indian Territory. He eventually became a Deputy U.S. Marshal, was a master of disguise, an expert marksman, had a Native American companion, and rode a silver horse.