u.s marine corps

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Marines with Marine Corps Special Operations Command (MARSOC) and 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion (2nd LAAD) conducting a live fire training exercise at Camp Lejeune, N.C., on June 6, 2017. Marines with MARSOC worked with 2nd LAAD to conduct live fire exercises to maintain proficiency and accuracy with various weapon systems. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Cody J. Ohira)

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Trump’s Pentagon is considering sending US troops to Syria

  • Trump’s Department of Defense is considering sending conventional ground forces to Syria to fight Islamic insurgents including ISIS.
  • The move would dramatically broaden the scope of U.S. military operations there, CNN reported Wednesday.
  • While the United States and a coalition of regional allies are heavily engaged in aerial bombardment of the various Islamic militias that have taken over wide swathes of Syria, and the U.S. has previously deployed special forces and military advisers there, it has never sent regular ground forces like the U.S. Army or Marine Corps in a combat capacity.
  • Such a move could risk committing U.S. troops to brutal counterinsurgency warfare with a high risk of casualties, as well as inflame regional tensions and further Islamic State’s conflict-of-civilizations narrative. Read more (2/15/17 8:18 PM)

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Kurt Chew-Een Lee was the first U.S. Marine Corps officer of Chinese descent. During the Korean War, Lee, a Marine Corps Lieutenant back then, and his platoon were facing Chinese troops aiding the North Korean forces. He drew fire to himself and yelled phrased in Mandarin, confusing the enemy troops, which led to his unit’s victory despite being outnumbered. For his heroism, he received the Navy Cross, the Silver Star, and two purple hearts, and he passed away on March 3, 2014.

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On February 23, 1945 (72 years ago today) a small U.S. flag was first raised atop Mount Suribachi soon after the mountaintop was captured at around 10:20 am. 1st Lt. Harold G. Schrier, executive officer of Easy Company, volunteered to lead a 40-man combat patrol up the mountain. Lt. Col. Johnson, the battalion commander, handed Schrier a flag saying, “If you get to the top put it up.” The patrol carried that 54-by-28-inch flag, which had been taken from the battalion’s transport ship, the USS Missoula, and up to the slopes of the extinct volcano. Lt. Schrier successfully led the combat patrol to the top. The flag was attached to a pipe, and the flagstaff was raised, marking the first time in history the American flag was raised on Japanese soil. The moment was captured by U.S. Marine Corps photographer, SSgt. Lou Lowery.

There was a roar from the Marines and sailors off shore and on the island, and the blasts of the ship horns alerted the Japanese, who up to this point had stayed in their cave bunkers. The Marines and corpsmen on Mt. Suribachi found themselves under fire from Japanese troops, but Schrier’s Marines were able quickly to eliminate the threat.

An F/A-18D Hornet and an E/A-6B Prowler are on elevator three to be brought to the flight deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz is underway conducting fleet replacement squadron carrier qualifications. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Lemieux/Released)

MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft return after a long-range raid from Combined Arms Training Center, Camp Fuji, Japan to Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa as part of Blue Chromite 2017, Nov. 4, 2016. The Marines honed their ability to project forces from afar by executing a long-range raid over 1,000 miles via MV-22B Osprey to include an aerial refueling by KC-130J Super Hercules. Blue Chromite is a U.S.-only exercise which strengthens the Navy-Marine Corps expeditionary, amphibious rapid-response capabilities based in Okinawa and the greater Indo-Asia-Pacific region. The Ospreys are part of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sergeant Major Michael Cato)

Warrior Wednesday: U.S. Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Force Reconnaissance Detachment conduct military operations in urban terrain training aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 19, 2015. These Marines are a part of the MEU’s Maritime Raid Force. The training provides the MEU with the opportunity to train for similar environments in preparation for their upcoming deployment.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos/Released)

A gaggle? No, a flock of Osprey? In any case, here’s 5 MV-22s in a pretty epic shot taken near Mt. Fuji.

CAMP FUJI, Japan (Nov. 4, 2016) MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft return after a long-range raid from Combined Arms Training Center, Camp Fuji, Japan to Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa as part of Blue Chromite 2017, Nov. 4, 2016. The Marines honed their ability to project forces from afar by executing a long-range raid over 1,000 miles via MV-22B Osprey to include an aerial refueling by KC-130J Super Hercules. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sergeant Major Michael Cato/released)