u boat watches

im doodling a page of budding tumblr artist style stereotypes its very fun pls send me asks describing som cliches u know of

http://iphonesoulpapers.tumblr.com/
Thailand.

[Update]+++Ok so my girlfriend is already in Thailand+++[Update]

Hi guys, my girlfriend is gonna go to Thailand in less than a month to study and my friends and I are planning to  make a trip there, a surprise trip on December and I really want to go and you would help me big time if you took just a minute of your time to click on some of my ads!

I’m also saving money from work obviously but I will need as much help as I can get!

Thank you very very much! And do let me know if you click so I can help you with anything you want!

Sincerely, Alan from Iphonesoulpapers!

The Nazi Megalodon Hoax

Don’t believe everything you see on television. This photo shocked viewers when it was shown on the Discovery Channel, and most people thought it was real. The photo shows a group of Nazis on a U-boat watching the large fins of a megalodon swim in the water. But the photo immediately raises some suspicions. The most obvious thing to notice is the absence of a wake in the water. If the animal truly was breaking the surface the water would be disturbed and it would cause a wake as it moved. The water is completely calm and undisturbed by the giant shark swimming at the surface. If such a large animal was truly at the surface it would cause the water to be disturbed quite noticeably. The rest of the photo is probably real, the Nazis and the U-boat are actually a part of this photograph, the giant shark was just later photoshopped in. Whether Discovery faked the image themselves or if they too got fooled by the photo is unknown, but don’t continue too consider this photo as authentic evidence that the megalodon is still alive.

May 24, 1917 - Britain Introduces Convoy System to Limit U-Boat Attacks

Pictured - Shepherds watch for sea-wolves.

Britain’s admiralty had considered but so far avoided introducing a convoy system for its merchant shipping. It had resisted all calls to do so, reluctant to see Royal Navy ships diverted from to guard duty, especially in case the Imperial German Navy should venture out for another major battle on the scale of Jutland. But leaving vital merchant shipping to dribble into Britain individually was proving even more risky. German U-boats, again practicing unrestricted submarine warfare, sank thousands of tons of Allied and neutral shipping in spring 1917. Leaving merchant ships by themselves was only providing Germany with juicy targets.

So on May 24 the first convoy sailed from Hampton Roads, Virginia, for Britain. The convoys like this one would be ten to fifty merchantmen, plus possibly a troopship of Americans, guarded by one cruiser, six destroyers, eleven armed trawlers, and two torpedo boats, plus British airships with observers looking down for submarines or the sudden streaks that indicated torpedoes. The Allies established eight collection points for vessels to gather before crossing the Atlantic. Hampton Roads; Halifax, Nova Scotia, for ships coming from the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence; Panama for ships from Australia and New Zealand; Rio de Janeiro for crucial Argentinian beef and horses; Murmansk for supplies to the Russians; Port Said and Gibraltar for east Indian and African trade and troop tranports; and Dakar, Senegal, for supplies and men from West and South Africa and Asia.

The first convoy was a remarkable success; only one merchant ship sunk when it fell behind. The introduction of the convoy system would rapidly limit German naval victories, safeguard the British economy and food supply, and allow millions of American Doughboys to cross the Atlantic unharmed.

Otto Giese (left) on watch with Hannes Fröhlich aboard U-181 while in the Indian Ocean, late 1944/Jan 1945.

On 6 May 1945, Otto Giese dropped the two code-key machines into the Singapore harbor, and later that day, the boat was “taken” by the Japanese Captain Marujama. Admiral Paul Wenneker sent the message on 8 May, that Lubeck was in place, “an early agreement between Germany and Japan, if one nation lost and the other continued fighting, the former would render its war material to the latter.” The crew was taken to Batu Pahat. After Germany’s surrender in May 1945 the U-boat was taken over by Japan at Singapore and commissioned as I-501 on 15 July 1945.

Photo is featured on Page 218 of Giese’s book “Shooting the War” which i bought recently and is a very good book packed with plenty of great photo’s!

Subway through the dark, carriage through the park; taxi down the street, get out and use my feet.

http://iphonesoulpapers.tumblr.com/

Thailand.

Hi guys, my girlfriend is gonna go to Thailand in less than a month to study and my friends and I are planning to  make a trip there, a surprise trip on December and I really want to go and you would help me big time if you took just a minute of your time to click on some of my ads!

I’m also saving money from work obviously but I will need as much help as I can get!

Thank you very very much! And do let me know if you click so I can help you with anything you want!

Sincerely, Alan from Iphonesoulpapers!