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A Moment in black history.
In 1933, Lawson founded the New Negro Alliance (NNA) in Washington, D.C., along with John A. Davis, Sr. and M. Franklin Thorne, to combat white-owned businesses in black neighborhoods that would not hire black employees.[10] The NNA instituted a then-radical Don’t Buy Where You Can’t Workcampaign, and organized or threatened boycotts against white-owned businesses. In response, some businesses arranged for an injunction to stop the picketing. Lawson, the lead attorney, with assistance by Thurgood Marshall, fought back – all the way to the United States Supreme Court in New Negro Alliance v. Sanitary Grocery Co. (1938) that safeguarded a right to boycott.[11] This became a landmark case in the struggle by African Americans against discriminatory hiring practices, and Don’t Buy Where You Can’t Work groups multiplied throughout the nation.
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A moment in #blackhistory

The 1968 Olympics Black Power salute was a political demonstration conducted by the African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (“The Star-Spangled Banner”), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games. #blackhistory365 #blackhistoryfacts #blackwallstreet #blackhistory #tytyskitchen #striveforgreatness #motivation (at Betty T. Ferguson Recreational Complex)

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