twows*

anonymous asked:

is it in the leaked the reunion of Arya and Nymeria? because that is my most waited leaked/spoiler since season 2😂

yes, that was also in the leaks so its true. it was basically confirmed by outside sources too when maisie went to canada where the wolves are to film. and same, but because d&d are abominations i won’t even be able to enjoy it. not fully at least. 

“average writer publishes about 1 book a decade” factoid actualy just statistical error. average writer publishes several books per decade. Westeros Georg, who lives in a new mexico and only publishes when the stars are aligned , is an outlier adn should not have been counted

8

“In my head I was like, ‘You have literally 30 seconds left in this room and if you don’t do something impressive nothing will ever come of it. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime chance, just take it.’ And he’s really scary. I can barely keep up. And he ends it saying, ‘You should be happy to have a husband like me. Now get over here and kiss me.’ So I walk up really close to his face and then I’m like, ‘Maybe I should kiss him. When else am I ever going to get a chance to kiss Leo DiCaprio, ever?” But another part of my brain clicks and I just go, Whack! I hit him in the face. And then I scream, ‘Fuck you!’ And that’s not in the script at all. The room just went dead silent and I froze. I’m thinking, ‘You just hit Leonardo DiCaprio in the face. They’re going to arrest you because that’s assault. You’re definitely never going to work again, that’s for sure. They’ll probably sue you as well in case there’s a bruise on his face and he needs to film something else.’ And then all of a sudden Marty and Leo just burst out laughing. Marty says, “That was great!” Leo’s like, “Hit me again!”

Hey fam, couple more interesting things to note from the infodump that brought us the news about Euron and Dragonbinder the other day, though neither really qualify as “news.” I don’t have the WOIAF app so I didn’t know this (many of y’all probably did!) but apparently it confirms that, yes, Robb legitimized Jon and named him his heir in his will. I addressed the theory that he changed his mind to Arya a li’l while back, and I know Preston Jacobs has the idea that it was actually Catelyn *rolls eyes so hard they spin off into the atmosphere* but yeah, this is canon. I’m still not quite sold on Jon as the next King in the North because Stannis is still right there, Ramsay doesn’t have Rickon in his power like in the show, and not only do the clans know Bran is alive, but they won’t be alone after he speaks to Stannis and Theon from the weirwood at the crofters’ village. But we shall see!

The other bit (and again, this is probably old news for those of y’all more studious than I am) is this quote from GRRM’s Notablog from 2007…

Ah, if only the Tyrion in the books could fly, what mischief he will… ah… could… ah, never mind.

…which leaves me more convinced than ever that Tyrion is indeed the third dragonrider for endgame alongside Dany and Jon.

bael-bard  asked:

You are one of the few people who believes that Arya will survive and reunite with her family. Can you explain why? To me it always seemed like Arya is too damaged to live a normal life after the series ends. And there is FM problem. I doubt, that they approve of deserting, so even if Arya survives, one day they'll come for her. I always assumed that her story will be the bitter part of the ending. Dying in the North and leading the wolf pack. Long wolf dies but the pack lives. What's your take?

Damn! Am I really “one of the few people” who thinks that Arya makes it through? I am so bad at determining what the fandom thinks! Ludicrously, entertainingly bad!! Everyone watch me be bad at this!!!

Anywho. I’m sorry to be a pedantic dick about this, but: “normal life” means precisely squat. I guarantee that if I asked you to straight-up define what “normal life” means, and why those outside of it should be considered more likely to die, you wouldn’t have a coherent answer. Moreover, Arya’s a Lord Paramount’s daughter, so she was never going to live a “normal life.” This is what was going to happen to her if her father’s downfall had never happened…

“You,” Ned said, kissing her lightly on the brow, “will marry a king and rule his castle, and your sons will be knights and princes and lords and, yes, perhaps even a High Septon.”

…and that sure as shit ain’t the average experience of her time and place! (This, btw, is part of why I’m leery of interpretations of ASOIAF as a radical revolutionary text: almost all of the POVs are elites. Even Davos has been knighted by the time we meet him. Deconstructing the elite perspective is not the same as presenting the working-class perspective, and genuinely revolutionary texts tend not to grant POV status to inconveniently monstrous peasants like Chett and Varamyr. ASOIAF is a reconstructive text, not a revolutionary one.)(Hey I’m an anti-Marx leftist, can you tell??)

Anywho. If Arya was really going to succumb to the Faceless Men and/or die in their service, I don’t think GRRM would have bothered with this:

“It’s just a sword,” she said, aloud this time…

…but it wasn’t.

Needle was Robb and Bran and Rickon, her mother and her father, even Sansa. Needle was Winterfell’s grey walls, and the laughter of its people. Needle was the summer snows, Old Nan’s stories, the heart tree with its red leaves and scary face, the warm earthy smell of the glass gardens, the sound of the north wind rattling the shutters of her room. Needle was Jon Snow’s smile. He used to mess my hair and call me “little sister,” she remembered, and suddenly there were tears in her eyes.

Polliver had stolen the sword from her when the Mountain’s men took her captive, but when she and the Hound walked into the inn at the crossroads, there it was. The gods wanted me to have it. Not the Seven, nor Him of Many Faces, but her father’s gods, the old gods of the north. The Many-Faced God can have the rest, she thought, but he can’t have this.

This is the ultimate thesis of Arya’s time among the Faceless Men: she is terrible at being a Faceless Man. She’s good at the mechanics of assassination, don’t get me wrong, but she’s failing utterly at the crucial ego-death part of it, because she has a pre-existing identity in which she’s still super-invested. She cannot be No One, because she is Arya Stark, and will always be Arya Stark. Her whole story hinges on that central tension: will the hell she goes through be enough to destroy her sense of self? I adamantly come down on the side of “no.” She will reclaim her identity, and like Theon, her true name will return to her chapter headings. 

Why? Because Arya Stark is the goddamn Batman (from the traumatic parent-death to the ninja training to the stubborn desire to fight for the powerless even as your world tells you to be a nihilist), and GRRM knows that Batman means nothing without Bruce Wayne. Everything about Arya’s relationship to home and her Stark identity suggests to me that this is a “pull yourself back just before you’re lost forever” story. The Faceless Men bring that struggle to the brink, because their whole thing is destroying identity in the name of a perfect death. But between Needle and Raff, Arya is clearly not passing that test. She’s still “the Ned’s girl.” Which IMO will be her triumph in the books to come–reclaiming the Stark identity that has been put in such danger. 

Now, if you were GRRM, and you wanted to spark that reclamation of self, how would you do it? Would you maybe take a girl Arya knows, and have her passed off as “Arya Stark,” and send her to Braavos to spark the true Arya’s homecoming, bringing Arya’s identity arc to a head by having her actively retake her Stark self from the young woman burdened with it? Because…I think that’s exactly what GRRM is doing! I firmly believe this is why he had Stannis send Jeyne Poole (feigned as Arya) off with Justin Massey in Theon I TWOW–to provide Arya with precisely the challenge she needs to abandon the FM and all they represent, as well as a way back home. The spectacle of someone else claiming her name will IMO be the perfect thing to bring Cat/Mercy/whatever else back to Arya Stark.

anonymous asked:

I love Sansa's "Alayne Stone" story for many reasons, but the main reason why is because we get to see a side of her that she always had, but she suppressed it due to her courtesies. We get to see her sharp-tongued, snarky, sassy side. Honestly, when i read some of the Alayne Stone chapters, i was so surprised. I was like "wait what? Did she just say this?!".

My favourite is the one in TWOW when she can’t stop salting Harry the Heir, lol, though it also gives me an… unpleasant/creepy vibe for reasons.

it’s interesting because we don’t know if that’s part of her naturally growing up, if she’s finding in her Alayne persona a way out of the social constrictions and taboos connected to her former status, or if she’s adjusting to people’s expectations of how a bastard girl should behave. Probably all of this. Bastards are invisible: they’re neither players nor prizes, and unless they overstep their boundaries nobody really cares for them. Sansa used to have the spotlight firmly planted on her, because of her heritage and status. Alayne is a nobody, the bastard daughter of a minor lord, and counts nothing—hell, she even looks like nothing special (something to remember in her future interactions with Harry), her gorgeous auburn hair replaced by a plain shade of brown and modest clothes. In part, she resents this invisibility (and sometimes forgets what’s her place, like that time when she “accidentally” wore Tully colors), but it also gives her an unique leeway, the opportunity to watch and learn things unobserved and unnoticed, make people spill their secrets and store them for later, not unlike Arya’s wanderings in Braavos under various aliases.

but bastards are also seen as untrustworthy, less moral than /regular/ people, thus less worthy of being treated with respect. They’re “wanton”: there’s no wench half so lusty as one bastard born, Marillion says as he proceeds to paw Sansa, who under Alayne’s guise has no longer her status to shield her from unwanted sexual contact, and is even expected to be enthusiastically available. I think she immediately realizes that she can no longer act like the sheltered, innocent girl she is (or used to be)—that persona worked as best as it could when she was in King’s Landing, but now it’s useless and, if anything, suspicious. 

So she creates a new one, one that’s older, wiser and more experienced, more worldly than what she really is. She models Alayne around the idea that bastards must fight for their right to exist since they moment they’re born. She adapts. She doesn’t drop her courtesies altogether, but she adjusts them to the new situation, hones a new, sharper edge to her still formally polite words. She gets bolder with LF in calling him out on his shit (though interestingly we get less of that in AFFC, when aunt Lysa is gone and she’s Alayne for everyone except him, as if she subconsciously recognizes him as her only source of power). She still blushes a lot, but she’s working on it. She gets practical, because “bastard brave” girls get shit done (see her assertiveness with Sweetrobin and the maester). I think there’s also a degree of trauma connected with how everyone saw Sansa Stark as “stupid” (to the point that she started believing it, or at least wondering if it wasn’t true) that now she’s shedding… by disassociation, but still.

anyway, yes. I totally wonder whether, once she sheds “Alayne” from her system too, something of the bastard brave girl will remain, and which parts specifically.

By the time we got to Weathertop, Tolkien had me. ‘Gil-Galad was an elven king,’ Sam Gamgee recited, ‘of him the harpers sadly sing.’ A chill went through me, such as Conan and Kull had never evoked.

Almost forty years later, I find myself in the middle of my own high fantasy, A Song of Ice and Fire. The books are huge, and hugely complex, and take me years to write. Within days of each volume being published, I begin to get emails asking when the next is coming out. “You do not know how hard it is to wait,’ some of my readers cry plaintively. I do, I want to tell them, I know just how hard it is. I waited too. When I finished The Fellowship of the Ring, it was the only volume out in paperback. I had to wait for Ace to bring out The Two Towers, and again for The Return of the King. Not a long wait, admittedly, yet somehow it seemed like decades. The moment I got my hands on the next volume I put everything else aside so I could read it … but halfway through The Return of the King, I slowed down. Only a few hundred pages remained, and once they were done, I would never be able to read Lord of the Rings for the first time again. As much as I wanted to know how it all came out, I did not want the experience to be over.

That was how fiercely I loved those books, as a reader.
—  George R.R. Martin, discussing “the ancestors of Ice and Fire” in “The Heirs of Turtle Castle” from Dreamsongs

fireandiceblr  asked:

What do you think about Sansa's crush on Loras? Do you think it means something that no matter how much she seems to grow as a character she still holds a crush over some pretty knight that never really seemed to care about her and she still imagines him when she kisses people (even if her thoughts get directed back to sandor)

Well… Loras is a very safe crush.

Loras plays the role for Sansa that teen heartthrobs do for many adolescent girls, a safe exploration of their growing sexuality.

The idolization of teen idols typically begins in early adolescence when girls start to become interested in romance and dating and more aware of social norms which suggest that they should have romantic feelings for someone of the opposite sex (Simon, Eder, & Evans, 1992). Rather than dating in real life, developing a crush on a teen idol is a way for girls to acknowledge their emerging sexual feelings in a safe, non-threatening way (Engle & Kasser, 2005). Because teen boys are viewed by girls as only interested in sex (McRobbie, 1991), teen idols are a preferable option. Further, they often project a feminine form of masculinity that is sexually non-threatening and thus accessible to young girls (Engle &: Kasser, 2005; Karniol, 2001; McRobbie, 1991; Sweeney, 1994).

Bitten by Twilight: Youth Culture, Media, & the Vampire Franchise

One of the most popular ways people like to hate teenage girls is to complain about their “insane” crushes on boy band members. Now, let me fucking tell you something: those big dumb crushes are what helps a teenage girl develop her sexuality in a safe environment that she can control. In her world, she can listen to One Direction and hear all these songs about how great she is, and how much these cute non-threatening boys want to make her feel special. Why is this so important? Because no one is pushing them. There’s no fourteen year old boy shoving his clammy hands down your shirt without your consent. These fantasy boys are not convincing a girl to send naked pictures, only to show all their friends and call her a slut. In the fantasy land of boy bands, the girl has all the power. And we need to stop judging them for wanting to escape into that.

–Meghan Harper, “Why I Fucking Love Teenage Girls”

ASOIAF is a medieval-style world, so it of course doesn’t have pop idols and movie stars, but it does have tournaments and tourney champions, who play that role for the adolescent girls of Westeros. (And the boys, too. Consider Bran’s idolization of knights, especially the Kingsguard.) And Loras Tyrell is not just one of the best upcoming stars of the tourney scene, but he’s so dreamy handsome, young, and from one of the best families of Westeros. (Even Robert Baratheon crushes on him, in a manly way.)

Now, the fact that Loras is actually gay (as are so many teen heartthrobs - George Michael, we miss you) makes him even safer, whether Sansa consciously realizes it or not. This is all the more important, since because of the close circles of Westeros aristocracy, Sansa Stark has far more of a chance of personally interacting with Loras Tyrell than your typical teenage girl has with her most beloved Bieber or Zayn.

So when Sansa actually has the opportunity to meet Loras, is even led to believe she might marry him… the expression of her sexuality, while very real, is also very safe:

The sight of Ser Loras Tyrell standing on her threshold made Sansa’s heart beat a little faster.

Sansa was finding it hard to walk and talk and think all at the same time, with Ser Loras touching her arm.

I am talking to him, and he’s touching me, he’s holding my arm and touching me.

Desperately she tried to think of something clever and charming to say to him, but her wits had deserted her. She almost told him how beautiful he was, until she remembered that she’d already done that.

Ser Loras in white silk, so pure, innocent, beautiful. The dimples at the corner of his mouth when he smiled. The sweetness of his laugh, the warmth of his hand. She could only imagine what it would be like to pull up his tunic and caress the smooth skin underneath, to stand on her toes and kiss him, to run her fingers through those thick brown curls and drown in his deep brown eyes. A flush crept up her neck.

–ASOS, Sansa I

Or, for a visual representation:

Now, the trouble (or not?) is that this safe crush of Sansa’s is no longer something she can rely on. Whether it’s because of her aging into womanhood, or because of her actual experiences with sexuality – the dark masculine danger of Sandor Clegane, her marriage to Tyrion Lannister (including seeing him nude and sleeping next to him in bed for weeks), the explicit rape threats of Joffrey Baratheon and Marillion, the disturbing attentions and unfatherly kisses of Petyr Baelish – when she wishes to escape into her formerly favorite safe fantasy of Loras Tyrell, it twists away from her into something else:

Before she could summon the servants, however, Sweetrobin threw his skinny arms around her and kissed her. It was a little boy’s kiss, and clumsy. Everything Robert Arryn did was clumsy. If I close my eyes I can pretend he is the Knight of Flowers. Ser Loras had given Sansa Stark a red rose once, but he had never kissed her… and no Tyrell would ever kiss Alayne Stone. Pretty as she was, she had been born on the wrong side of the blanket.
As the boy’s lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt, when his cruel mouth pressed down on her own. He had come to Sansa in the darkness as green fire filled the sky. He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak.

–AFFC, Alayne II

Note that there are many analyses of “the unkiss” (link 1, link 2), Sansa’s imagined memory of being kissed by Sandor the night of the Blackwater, but what many point out is that it is again an attempt by Sansa of a safe fantasy, a subconscious attempt to control and understand and romanticize a frightening sexually-charged situation. It’s just several octaves away from her non-threatening fantasies of kissing and touching the “beautiful” Loras.

And though you say Sansa still holds this crush, please note that Loras is only mentioned in Sansa’s narrative once in AFFC (that scene above), where she recognizes that Loras’s attentions were nothing real, no kisses, just a rose. Also, when she thinks about the men who helped her in King’s Landing, Loras is not one of them. Furthermore, he’s not mentioned at all in her TWOW preview chapter – which, considering it focuses on an upcoming tourney and the young knights who wish to be its champions, should be a perfect occasion for the pretty knight Loras to stroll through Sansa’s head, and yet he does not.

So I would say that Sansa’s adolescent crush on Loras is something perfectly understandable… and also something she has outgrown. I hope that helps!