twitter sexism

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a minimum of 40-60 girls were dress coded at my school this morning, but not even ONE male was. a percentage of those girls weren’t able to have a change of clothes delivered to them by a parent and were forced to miss a number of final exams. no one at our school has ever been particularly fond of the dress code, however this is taking it too far. if you’ve successfully fought/know someone who successfully fought against dress code please help us by informing us on how to go about ridding our school of this sexist code. honestly, calling a student a skank???? NOT OKAY. we live in Southern California, and right now our weather averages about 100°F (roughly 38°C) and girls are expected to wear long pants. girls were FORCED to miss FINAL EXAMS just because what they were wearing was deemed “distracting”. a large portion of these girls proved they were not breaking dress code (no shorter than four inches above the knee) by measuring with a ruler, but were not released. please help spread this and let us know if there’s any way to fight this without causing us more trouble!

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Twitter is skewering the ‘New York Post’ for a piece on why man “won’t date hot women”

  • There are a lot of ways men can broadcast to the world how much they hate women, and writing an article titled “Why I won’t date hot women anymore” is certainly one of them.
  • Such is the headline on a piece the New York Post published on Wednesday, profiling an insufferable private equity executive named David Rochkind (along with a few other like-minded New Yorkers). 
  • The 40-year-old Upper West Side resident humbly told the Post there was a time when he could have anyone he wanted, which meant he went after the “hottest girl you could find."Not anymore! Read more. (4/13/2017 10:45 AM)

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“The decision to cancel a season is serious and consequential, and reflects Harvard’s view that both the team’s behavior…run[s] counter to the mutual respect that is a core value of our community,” Harvard President Drew Faust wrote in a statement. Faust also said that there have been initial discussions looking into whether this behavior occurs on other sports teams.

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You need to know about Ohio’s new abortion bill that would ban abortion at six weeks, before many women even know they’re pregnant

North Dakota and Arkansas passed similar bills that were later struck down as incompatible with Roe v. Wade; the Supreme Court declined to hear any appeals, sending the signal that an Ohio law would meet the same fate. But Ohio’s conservative lawmakers see an opening after Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election last month. 

READ MORE

Lewis’s Law: Twitter Version

(Lewis’s Law states that the comments on any article about feminism will justify the need for feminism.)

So today someone posts a thing about how it’s hard to talk to men about issues that affect primarily women.

And this dude responds saying he doesn’t think this is a real problem that women experience:

Apparently without irony. So of course he gets the response:

Not getting it:

STILL NOT GETTING IT:

Does he get it yet? Nope:

He goes through this ENTIRE EXCHANGE without realizing that he is demonstrating the exact issue being discussed. I’m still not sure he understands what’s going on, despite multiple people trying to explain it to him. It’s just… this is a work of art. It’s mansplaining all the way down.

Talk about the Twitter post about sexism

Since we apparantly still live in the 1950′s sexism seems to still be a gigantic issue in video games. One problem I have with this is the people who speak up about it like it can just be ignored and blocked, that’s why that exists. But when you get told that literally every single game, something has to be wrong. 

I don’t understand how people can categorize it as trolling or just being toxic, because it is legit harassment towards someone based on gender and that shit seems to be more acceptable than toxic people. 

I had a game where these guys were going against each other, insulting each others playstyle and they threw their arguments aside just to fully focus their attack on me and being a girl.

It’s pathetic and sad having to block people on twitter because they say stuff like “please no feminism” and “wow this overreaction”

It’s just so sad to see, I literally have no words. I have no issues dealing with these people, I would move on and do whatever the fuck I was doing but knowing that girls everywhere suffer thanks to this behaviour, it literally makes me so uncomfortable and that this seems to never get punished- it’s… so disgusting. Nobody speaks up because exactly these reactions come back.

“are you sure you weren’t just playing bad?” buddy this guy was a tracer only main who said he couldn’t tank so he went torb instead and died in under 2 seconds, I’m pretty sure I wasn’t the issue. 

fucking cut my fingers off and wake me up when this shit is over and girls don’t have to be scared in video games anymore or don’t have to be scared to speak up. 


fucking hell.

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A husband and wife each published an article. It became a case study in online harassment.

Online harassment is a universal problem, but it definitely falls harder on some people than others. In a recent Guardian study of abusive comments on its own articles, eight of its top 10 most abused writers were women, and two were men of color.

Almost everyone experiences some online abuse, but not everyone experiences the same level or intensity of it. For some, online harassment is a nuisance that’s easily shrugged off. For others, it’s not so easy.

That’s why it’s important to step into someone else’s shoes every now and then, like Washington Post pop music critic Chris Richards did. When Richards and his wife each had articles published on the same page of the Post, what happened was almost a perfect A/B test proving how disproportionate harassment works.

It’s easy for some to be skeptical that online harassment is that big a deal, or that it’s worse for people who aren’t white men. It’s easy to say something like, “It’s not because you’re a woman, it’s because they disagree with you,” or, “Whatever, it’s the internet, people are going to be jerks.”

And yes, people disagree and are jerks. But they also tend to be much bigger, nastier jerks to women, people of color, and folks in other marginalized groups.

Women and people of color can shrug off harassment too, of course, and often do. But they also tend to face more, and more vicious, attacks, including attacks that are specifically targeted at their gender or their race. All of that can wear down even those with the thickest skin, and its long-term harms can sneak up on you over time.

This is especially true of journalists and commentators with public platforms who write about controversial topics. And as Amanda Taub pointed out for Vox, this means online harassment can have real harms on journalism if it makes women and people of color reluctant to cover controversial issues.