twin cylinder

3

Details: The RUF RtR Narrow

The idea behind the 218 mph Ruf turbo Rennsport (RtR) is to build a Turbo-Coupé, which fulfills all needs of an enthusiastic sports car driver.

The RtR projects its 802bhp via an all-wheel drive system, deployed onto the road by ultra-wide 255mm (front) and 325mm (rear) tires. At high speeds, increased downforce comes from the motorsport-derived rear spoiler, while braking is attained by carbon ceramic discs, measuring 410mm front and 390mm rear, with six-piston calipers on the front discs and four-piston calipers acting on the rear. The powertrain is a well-proven 3.8-liter twin-turbo six-cylinder unit, featuring a dry sump lubrication system with external oil tank. 

WHY THE ‘PURPLE RAIN’ MOTORCYCLE WAS THE PERFECT PRINCE RIDE
This small-scale custom bike fit him perfectly.

One of the most enduring images of Prince is the Purple Rain album cover and movie poster showing him astride a purple motorcycle. With billowing smoke, dramatic backlighting and heroic upward angle, Prince and his tricked-out ride make for a truly indelible image.

Surely Prince’s badass bike was some monstrous Harley, right? While that was probably the perception of many fans, Prince actually rode a motorcycle as diminutive as the musical icon himself. The bike was actually a customized Honda CM400A twin-cylinder starter bike that was notable for its low seat height and its automatic two-speed transmission that absolved His Purpleness of having to squeeze a clutch lever.

He kitted out the bike with a classic ’70s Vetter Windjammer fairing and a seat with pink velour inserts. Most motorcyclists would be dismissive of such a small-scaled machine, but Prince’s ride fit the five-foot-two pop god perfectly.

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The True Companion

Manufactured either in the US or in France/Belgium c.1869~1870′s - serial number 204.
.32 cap and ball twin-shot cylinder, single action with spur trigger, brass knuckle folding handle, brass frame, blued cylinder.

A very streamlined version of Louis Dolne’s more famous Apache pepperbox, without the useless folding blade and with a noticeably slimmer profile due to its reduced cylinder capacity. There’s no way to know if that gun was a copy or a production of Dolne himself, but the lack of name and the use of a caplock firing mechanism indicates it might have in fact been an American production.

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Long living legend⬇Alfa Romeo Tipo 33
Alfa started development of the Tipo 33 in the early 1960s, with the first car being built in 1965. It was sent to Autodelta to be completed and for additional changes to be made. It used an Alfa TZ2 straight-4 engine, but Autodelta produced its 2.0 litre V8 soon after. The 2000cc Tipo 33 mid-engined prototype debuted on 12 March 1967 at the Belgian hillclimbing event at Fléron, with Teo Zeccoli winning. The first version was named as “periscope” because it had very characteristic air inlet.
The original T33 proved unreliable and uncompetitive in the 1967 World Sportscar Championship, its best result a 5th at the Nürburgring 1000, driven by Zeccoli & Roberto Bussinello.
In 1968, Alfa’s subsidiary, Autodelta, created an evolution model called 33/2. A road version, dubbed Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale, was also introduced. After winning his class at Daytona it was called “Daytona”.
After finishing the Targa Florio on place 1 & 2, it had some more good finishes.
Then the Tipo 33/3 made its debut in 1969 at the 12h of Sebring. It was now an open prototype.
Alfa did not take part in Le Mans after Lucien Bianchi’s death in a test session. The car took a couple of wins in smaller competitions but overall the 1969 season was not a successful one and Alfa was placed 7th in the Championship.
1970 was not much better.
n 1971 the Alfa effort was finally successful with some class wins. And De Adamich/ Pescarolo won at Brands Hatch and Peterson/de Adamich won at Watkins Glen.
The 33/4 entered the CanAm 1972-74.
With the 33TT12 Alfa won the championship in 1975 after 2nd place in 1974. For 1976 Autodelta was concentrating on other things and the car was rarely used in competitions.
In 1977 Alfa won again the championship with the 33SC12.
The SC12 Turbo was Alfa’s first twin turbocharged 12 cylinder engine and was later used on Brabham-Alfa & Alfa Romeo 177 F1 cars.
#motorsport #vintageracing #racing #rennlegenden #whenracingwasracing #lemans #lasarthe #lemans24 #24hlemans #enduranceracing #nürburgring #12hsebring #arturomerzario #rolfstommelen #teodorozeccoli #alfaromeo #alfaromeotipo33 #targaflorio #helmutmarko #henripescarolo #jackyickx

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BMW Art Car #3: Roy Lichtenstein 320i 1977. 

In 1977, Roy Lichtenstein designed the third vehicle in the BMW Art Car Collection, a BMW 320 Group 5. The colourful, vibrant Pop-art landscape reflects his famous comic strip style in the paintwork, the surroundings flashing by depicting the driver’s view from the moving racing car. 

“I pondered on it for a long time and put as much into it as I possibly could. I wanted the lines I painted to be a depiction the road showing the car where to go. The design also shows the countryside through which the car has travelled. One could call it an enumeration of everything a car experiences – only that this car reflects all of these things before actually having been on a road,” said Roy Lichtenstein commenting on his design of the BMW 320i.

Roy Lichtenstein, who was born in New York in 1923, is considered to be one of the founders of American pop art. Until 1938 he painted portraits of jazz musicians, attended the “Art Students League”, finally studying art in Ohio. His earlier works range from cubism to expressionism. He did not become interested in trivial culture such as comics and advertising until the late fifties. His pop art paintings were created in 1961. These were followed by caricatures of the “American way of life”, experiments with well-known works of art, sculptures and films. He died in New York in 1997.

Roy Lichtenstein – The BMW 320 group 5 racing version

  •  four-cylinder in-line engine
  • 4 valves per cylinder
  •  twin overhead camshafts
  • displacement: 1999 cm³
  • power output: 300 bhp
  • top speed: 290 km/h 

After its completion, Roy Lichtenstein’s Art Car was able to celebrate its premiere twice – as a work of art at the Centre Pompidou in Paris and as a racing car in the 24-hour race at Le Mans in June 1977. The car was driven by Hervé Poulain and Marcel Mignot from France. The car with the number 50 achieved a ninth place in the overall rating and finished first in its class.

Heinkel He 177 Greif (Griffin)

Specifications

Crew:

5

Length:

22 m (72 ft 2 in)

Wingspan:

31.44 m (103 ft 1 in)

Height:

6.7 m (21 ft)

Wing area:

101.5 m² (1,092 ft²)

Empty weight:

16,800 kg (37,000 lb)

Loaded weight:

31,000 kg (68,340 lb)

Engine:

2x Daimler-Benz DB 610 (twin DB 605) 24-cylinder liquid-cooled inline engines, 2,950 hp (2,170 kW) each

Maximum speed:

565 km/h (350 mph) at 6,100 m (21,000 ft)

Service ceiling:

9,400 m (30,800 ft)

Guns:

2 x 20 mm MG 151 cannon

3 x MG 131 machine gun

3 x MG 81 machine gun

Bombs:

up to 7,200 kg (15,873 lb) of bombs or 3 guided missiles (Henschel Hs 293 or Fritz X)

3

Photo 1: www.instagram.com/apollonia_kotero

WHY THE ‘PURPLE RAIN’ MOTORCYCLE WAS THE PERFECT PRINCE RIDE


One of the most enduring images of Prince is the Purple Rain album cover and movie poster showing him astride a purple motorcycle. With billowing smoke, dramatic backlighting and heroic upward angle, Prince and his tricked-out ride make for a truly indelible image. 

Prince rode a motorcycle as diminutive as the musical icon himself -the bike was actually a customized 1981 Honda CM400 twin-cylinder starter bike that was notable for its low seat height and its automatic two-speed transmission that absolved His Purpleness of having to squeeze a clutch lever.

He kitted out the bike with a classic '70s Vetter Windjammer fairing and a seat with pink velour inserts. Most motorcyclists would be dismissive of such a small-scaled machine, but Prince’s ride fit the five-foot-two pop god perfectly.

Honda’s advertisements from the time touted the low, 30-inch seat height and the ability of even short riders to stand confidently flat-footed rather than on tip-toes. Certainly it would have detracted from Prince’s imperious appearance in the Purple Rain photo if he’d appeared in danger of toppling over. As it stands, it just might be one of the most memorable pop culture motorcycle photos of all time.

Depending whom you ask, two or three bikes were used for the film. One belonged to Prince; the other, or others, were replicas used by stunt riders for the more daring sequences. Next time you see Purple Rain, watch the not-Lake Minnetonka scene and look closely at the motorcycle tires — you’ll see how the tire changes from street to off-road tread.

Prince kept his motorcycle and used it again in Graffiti Bridge, his 1990 sequel to Purple Rain. His bike retained its Vetter fairing, but was repainted black and some of its chrome pieces were gold-plated. After Graffiti Bridge, the motorcycle was retired to his Paisley Park estate.

The Hondamatic line was not so lucky. Honda produced the 400cc version from 1978 to 1981. Other engine sizes were offered in different years, but sales were poor, and Hondamatics were discontinued after 1983.

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BMW Art Car Number 7: Michael Jagamara Nelson M3 1989.

“A car is a landscape as it would be seen from a plane – I have included water, the kangaroo and the opossum.” Michael Jagamara Nelson
 
After seven days of hard and meticulous work, the Australian artist Michael Jagamara Nelson had transformed the black BMW M3 into a masterpiece of Papunya art. However, the geometric shapes only appear to be abstract. To the expert they reveal kangaroos or emus. Papunya paintings embody religious myths (“Dreaming”) passed on for thousands of years by generations of Aborigines in the form of rock and cave paintings. They constitute their cultural roots and are a source of inspiration for the future. The artist, who was born in Pikili, Australia, in 1949, is a member of the Warlpiri tribe and grew up in the Aborigine tradition. He learnt the ancient painting techniques used by his ancestors from his grandfather and developed a new style based on them. Since the mid-eighties Nelson has been considered the leading representative of the Papunya-Tula movement. His outstanding work includes a large mosaic, which stands in front of the Australian parliament building in Canberra, and an impressive looking wall in the foyer of the Sydney Opera House.

Michael Jagamara Nelson – The BMW M3 group A racing version

  • four-cylinder in-line engine
  • four  valves per cylinder
  • twin overhead camshafts
  • displacement: 2332 cm³
  • power output: 300 bhp
  • top speed: 280 km/h 

The M3 designed by Nelson comes from BMW Australia’s motor racing section which was then headed by the well-known racing driver Frank Gardner. In 1987 Tony Longhurst drove this car to victory in the Australian AMSCAR Championship. The M3 was employed by the Mobil 1 racing team in 1988. It was driven by the Australian several-times champion Peter Brock.

Discover all the BMW Art Cars at: http://www.artcar.bmwgroup.com.

Meet the brand new Ford GT!

More than 600bhp for Ford’s new race-bred road-going supercar. Yes please.

The Ford GT is back. And then some. Taking all the headlines at the Detroit motor show - and confirming some tasty rumours that have been rumbling for a little while now - is the third iteration of Ford’s supercar.

And gone is the supercharged V8 of old, replaced by an Ecoboost engine. Fear not, though, as it still packs a proper amount of cylinders. A twin-turbo 3.5-litre V6 engine drives the rear wheels with ‘more than’ 600bhp, and with motorsport development behind it, Ford is claiming great efficiency.

Of course, it’s performance we care about. Nothing’s confirmed in that area just yet, but a 0-60mph time close to 3.0secs and a top speed north of 200mph ought to be very feasible targets. [x]