The Fear - A still from the final episode of The Twilight Zone television series written by creator and host, Rod Serling. Original Air Date: 29 May 1964

Final Narration: Fear, of course, is extremely relative. It depends on who can look down and who must look up. It depends on other vagaries, like the time, the mood, the darkness. But it’s been said before, with great validity, that the worst thing there is to fear is fear itself. Tonight’s tale of terror and tiny people on the Twilight Zone.

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恐怖。 トワイライトゾーン

A California police officer has been fired for NOT using violence

Seaside, CA — A 20 year veteran of the CSU Monterey Bay police force, was given a notice of termination this week for choosing NOT to immediately resort to violent escalation during a confrontation with a suicidal student.

The unidentified officer was the first one on the scene when responding to an incident involving a suicidal college student in his CSUMB dorm room in February of this year. The officer showed a heartening level of restraint when dealing with a student, who was in his room with a knife and hammer, and was also threatening to light himself on fire.

“He was clearly a danger to himself and he was in crisis,” Marina Police Chief Edmundo Rodriguez said. “We were trying to keep him from accessing the weapons or leave, to get him medical attention.”

Instead of immediately resorting to violence, this officer was talking the student down and de-escalating the situation. The officer was successful in calming the student down and was going to get him a glass of water when the Marina police department showed up, and immediately began tasering the student.

The campus officer refused to taser the student, as he did not perceive a threat. Subsequently Rodriguez’s department later issued a “failure to act” complaint against the campus officer, accusing him of not engaging in a “highly agitated situation.”

“It defies logic and is extremely disappointing that, at a time when law enforcement is under fire for using more force than necessary, an officer is being terminated for attempting to use civilized methods to resolve a situation,” the student’s father said.

“Our officer did not believe he was any threat at all,” said Jeff Solomon, the union’s president.

“The other officers started yelling and screaming to get down, Tased him multiple times, and from what we understand (told the university officer) to Tase him again,” Solomon said.

The officer has been on paid leave since April according to his attorney who said she will now file a lawsuit against the university.

“We believe the officer in this case exercised restraint and good judgment in not tasing a student that was suffering from mental health issues,” said the officer’s attorney Kathleen Storm.

(Read more)

The classic television series The Twilight Zone premiered 55 years ago on October 2, 1959.

Here its host and creator, Rod Serling, riffs on his iconic role, narrating a Fire Safety PSA:

Excerpted from: Smokey Bear TV Spot, CARELESS KILLERS.
From the Series : Public Information and Training Motion Picture and Television Productions. Records of the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture, 1794 - ca. 2003

Only you can prevent forest fires—in the Twilight Zone…

10

Ten Great Horror Anthology Films To See Before You Die

An anthology film (also known as an omnibus film, package film, or portmanteau film) is a feature film consisting of several different short films, often tied together by only a single theme, premise, or brief interlocking event (often a turning point). Sometimes each one is directed by a different director. These differ from “revue films” such as Paramount on Parade (1930)—which were common in Hollywood in the early sound film era to show off their stars and related vaudeville-style acts—composite films, and compilation films.

Sometimes there is a theme, such as a place (e.g. New York Stories, Paris, je t'aime), a person (e.g. Four Rooms), or a thing (e.g. Twenty Bucks, Coffee and Cigarettes), that is present in each story and serves to bind them together. Two of the earliest films to use the form were Edmund Goulding’s Grand Hotel (1932), released by MGM with an all-star cast; and Paramount’s If I Had a Million (also 1932), featuring segments helmed by a number of directors.

Sometimes there is one “top-level” story, a framing device, which leads into the various “sub-stories”, as in Tales of Manhattan (1942), Flesh and Fantasy (1943), Dead of Night (1945), and The Illustrated Man (1968). Dead of Night helped to popularize the format for horror films—although they had existed as far back as Unheimliche Geschichten (1919)—and British company Amicus made several such films in the 1960s and 1970s.