twelve traditions

Progress, not perfection.
—  Twelve-Step saying
Lana Del Rey on sobriety & community service:

“I spent the last ten years in community service and writing folk songs. I’m not a trained social worker. I’ve been sober for ten years, so it was drug and alcohol rehabilitation. It was more traditional twelve-step call stuff. Just people who can’t get it together, me and groups of other people who have been based in New York for a long time working with people who need help and reached out. It was about building communities around sobriety and staying clean and stuff like that. That was my focus since I moved to the Bronx when I was eighteen. I liked music, but I considered it to be a luxury. It wasn’t my primary focus: the other stuff was really my life. Yeah, because I was an addict who got clean.”

“Well, one thing you learn when you do get sober is that complete surrender is the foundation for all good things to come. And I feel like that idea translated to all aspects of my life. When you have absolutely no idea what’s going to happen to you or what your career’s going to end up like and you’re just really open to anything, then you don’t really have anything to lose. A lot of different people come in and out of your life. And it’s really fun to say yes, and it’s really fun to be easy about everything and just let songs come to you and let people come to you. And it is free, in a way.”

“I’ve been involved in homeless outreach for the last seven years. Drug and alcohol awareness — I don’t drink, I don’t do drugs anymore. When things aren’t going that well musically, you know … I stopped focusing on music for a long time so I started focusing on other things that I knew more about.”

“I live in Koreatown on the edge of Hancock Park [in LA], so I do different things where and when I can. It’s not just people with mental illness on the streets, but also people who, throughout the years, have lost identification information, that sort of thing. And I know what to do, I know how I can help, because I was that person. My life was feeling murky, and that sense of disconnectedness from the streets is part of that.”

“It’s not my fault that love went bad. I met this person I was going to spend the rest of my life with. We were both clean and sober. We lived together and then he started getting into trouble, and he had to leave. There’s a lot of facets to my life, they don’t all seem like they would come together. It’s been a strange ride.”

In her years in New York, working “odd jobs” and “helping out in the community, in alcohol and drug awareness programs” and playing the singer-songwriter open-mic circuit. - The Telegraph

She now raises money for a charity that helps homeless people. “Music was my passion, but my work with this foundation is more important. I myself had the chance to be [helped by an organisation],” the singer revealed to French magazine Madame Figaro. “Helping others now feels like it’s my turn to give something back.”

“I’ve been really involved in my community for the last seven years that I’ve been here, in lots of different ways. I’ve been involved in homeless outreach for the last seven years. Drug and alcohol awareness – I don’t drink, I don’t do drugs anymore. When things aren’t going that well musically, you know … I stopped focusing on music for a long time so I started focusing on other things that I knew more about.”

Some volunteering. I have a group of friends who work individually with different affiliations, but basically, yes. It’s been good. I consider being able to pursue music a luxury, but it’s not the most important thing in my life. It’s just something that’s really nice that ended up working for me for right now. Just in New York, just in the last seven years. When I realized that maybe singing wasn’t going to be so easy I went back to what I knew how to do, what I was also really passionate about. There’s not many things, but …”

“I mean, I do feel alone in the things that I do sometimes … sometimes I feel that I’m walking my own path. I’m not anymore actually, but I think that I did. When you lead a different lifestyle from a lot of other people – like you don’t do drugs, you don’t drink, you try and stay above the dark side of things – it’s just, that was maybe a position I was trying to embody just to stay calm.”

youtube

Twelve Forever

Created by Julia Vickerman

Cartoon Network, 2015

anonymous asked:

i just got an art tablet as a graduation present and I thought "Oh no problem, this won't take long to switch over after twelve years of traditional art." Kill me this is so hard how do you do it?????????????(Granted this is day one)

You can do it I believe in you!! Just don’t forget to draw traditionally too because whew boy you’ll get super rusty when you go back to drawing on paper, I know I did @v@

Twelve Days of Christmas Aesthetic

On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
12 Drummers Drumming
Eleven Pipers Piping
Ten Lords a Leaping
Nine Ladies Dancing
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

Kallikantzaros

They are malevolent goblins in Southeastern European (Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian) and Anatolian folklore (Turkey). They dwell underground but come to the surface during the twelve days of Christmas, from 25th December to 6th January (from the winter solstice for a fortnight during which time the sun ceases its seasonal movement).

It is believed that Kallikantzaroi stay underground sawing the World tree, so that it will collapse, along with Earth. However, when they are about to saw the final part, Christmas dawns and they are able to come to the surface. They forget the Tree and come to bring trouble to mortals.

Finally, on the Epiphany (6th January), the sun starts moving again, and they must go underground again to continue their sawing. They see that during their absence the World tree has healed itself, so they must start working all over again. This happens every year.

Appearance

There is no standard appearance of Kallikantzaroi, there are regional differences on their appearance.

The Greeks describe them as:

  • Hairy bodies.
  • Horse legs.
  • Boar tusks (sometimes).
  • Tall.
  • Black.
  • Burning red eyes.
  • Goat’s or donkey’s ears.
  • Monkey’s arms.
  • Tongues that hang.
  • Huge heads.

Others see them as humans of small size smelling horribly, that are predominately male. However, different regions both have the similar description of them resembling a little, black devil.

They are, also, mostly blind, speak with a lisp and love to eat frogs, worms, and other small creatures.

Lore

The Kallikantzaroi are said to be the creatures of the night. There were many ways people could protect themselves during the days when the Kallikantzaroi were loose. They could leave a colander on their doorstep to trick the visiting Kallikantzaros. Since they could not count above 2 (3 is a holy number and by pronouncing it he would kill himself) the Kalikantzaros would sit at the doorstep counting, 1, 2… 1, 2… each hole of the colander, all night, until the sun rose and he were forced to hide.

Another method of protection was to leave the fire burning in the fireplace, all night, so that they cannot enter through there. In some areas, they would burn the Yule log, a large piece of wood, for the duration of the twelve days. And in other areas, people would throw smelly shoes in the fire, the stink repulsing the Kallikantzaroi and forcing them to stay away. Yet other ways to keep them away were to mark the door with a black cross on Christmas Eve and burn incense.

Legend has it that any child born during the twelve days of Christmas was in danger of transforming to a Kallikantzaros for each Christmas season, starting with adulthood. The antidote: Binding the baby in tresses of garlic or straw, or singeing the child’s toenails. In another legend, anyone born on a Saturday can see and talk with the Kallikantzaroi.

(According to a source) on the eve of Epiphany in Cyprus, villagers scatter pancakes on the roof to give the Kallikantzaroi something sweet to eat as they prepare to head out of town.

In Serbian Folklore

In Serbian Christmas traditions, the Twelve Days of Christmas used to be called the “unbaptised days” and were considered a time when demonic forces of all kinds were believed to be more than usually active and dangerous. People were cautious not to attract their attention, and did not go out late at night. The latter precaution was especially because of the demons called karakondžula, imagined as heavy, squat, and ugly creatures.

According to tradition, when a karakondžula found someone outdoors during the night of an unbaptised day, it would jump on the person’s back and demand to be carried wherever it wanted. This torture would end only when roosters announced the dawn; at that moment the creature would release its victim and run away.

In Anatolian Folklore

The karankoncolos is a malevolent creature in Northeast Anatolian Turkish folklore. According to late Ottoman Turkish myth, they appear on the first ten days of Zemheri, “the dreadful cold”, when they stand on murky corners, and ask seemingly ordinary questions to the passers-by. In order to escape harm, one should answer each question, using the word kara” (the Turkish word for “black”), or risk being struck dead by the creature. It was also said in Turkish folklore that the karakoncolos could call people out during the cold Zemheri nights, by imitating voices of loved ones. The karakoncolos’ victim risked freezing to death if he or she could not awake from the charm. 

mermaidelephant  asked:

So I'm really wondering about Obi-Wan in your Anabasis verse. You seem to like to write him as a stickler for the rules of the Jedi and their Code, very sola scriptura and sola fide, and that just seems like ideology Anakin would never ever agree with. I assume with character development Obi-Wan will become more of a loose constructionist and use that handy elastic clause but...I just really want those two to be close and get along like vitriolic best buds. No more "a certain point of view" :(

Oooh, okay. So Obi-Wan, like everyone else in Anabasis, is dealing with a lot of unvoiced trauma. He’s a survivor of the genocide of the Jedi (a genocide in which Darth Vader played a major role), and he’s spent years now on the run and living on the fringes of society.

Anabasis Obi-Wan in some ways has a slight advantage over canon Obi-Wan, because he obviously never knew Anakin and therefore doesn’t see the destruction of the Jedi as a personal failure on his part. So Anabasis Obi-Wan never went into hiding in the Outer Rim. Instead he went on the run, striking out against the Empire whenever he could, and eventually joining up with a Rebel cell.

And now the Empire has fallen and the Republic has been restored, and he’s returned to Coruscant and the Jedi Temple, and suddenly he finds himself on the Jedi Council. And he feels like he’s in way over his head.

In Anabasis the Clone Wars began with the Battle of Naboo in TPM, and ended a scant five years later with the creation of the Empire. So Obi-Wan is used to thinking of himself as a Jedi Knight, and a junior one at that. He was still only a few years past his apprenticeship when everything fell apart. And now they’re rebuilding the Jedi Order and he’s being told he’s not only a Jedi Master, but also a member of the Council?

(A Council which is only six strong, rather than the traditional twelve, because there just isn’t anybody left to populate it. The members of the Council in Anabasis are: Yoda, Mace Windu, Adi Gallia, Yan Dooku, Jocasta Nu, and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Obi-Wan secretly feels like he’s not quite ready to be a Master, let alone a member of the Council. And Dooku and Jocasta are both too unorthodox to have ever been considered for the Council in the pre-Empire Order. But there’s no one else left.)

So Anabasis Obi-Wan is trying very, very hard to be the perfect Jedi. Which means he’s kind of doubling down on those sola scriptura and sola fide tendencies that he has in canon. (And, btw, I love you for making that analogy.) But at the same time it’s becoming increasingly difficult to hold on to that as the story progresses.

Anakin and Obi-Wan start off in Anabasis on probably the worst foot possible. Anakin is a Sith Lord and a Jedi killer, and Obi-Wan has no history with him that might make him even slightly interested in understanding Anakin’s actions. Meanwhile Anakin is predisposed to hate Obi-Wan because a) he’s a Jedi, b) he killed Darth Maul (thus robbing Anakin of the chance to do so himself), c) although Obi-Wan doesn’t know this, he killed one of Vader’s agents, d) he’s one of Anakin’s most regular prison guards, and e) at one point in the story, Obi-Wan actually ends up with the detonator (now defunct) to Anakin’s transmitter. (Not that Obi-Wan knows that’s what it is.)

For a long time Obi-Wan is convinced that Vader is playing them. But as the story goes on, and Anakin has several on-screen breakdowns that are obviously both unplanned and unfeigned, and really don’t further his cause at all, and after Obi-Wan has seen Anakin with Padme a couple of times and is finding it increasingly difficult to believe that everything is an act - particularly because Vader really has been quite effective in destroying his Master’s Empire, which doesn’t make a lot of sense as an evil plot…. After all of that, Obi-Wan is left increasingly confused.

And it doesn’t at all help his state of mind when Shmi reveals that she thought she was sending her son to be a Jedi. The knowledge that this Sith Lord could have been, maybe even should have been, a Jedi shakes Obi-Wan deeply. It threatens the very foundations of his beliefs.

One of the things I didn’t actually plan for, but which has grown out of the story as I’ve written, is Obi-Wan’s relationship with Dex (of Dex’s Diner fame). Dex helped Obi-Wan escape when the Purges went down, and he’s remained one of Obi-Wan’s contacts and a good friend. During Anabasis proper he kind of becomes Obi-Wan’s bartender therapist, and helps Obi-Wan talk through some of his growing uncertainties.

I don’t want to give too much away yet, but I will say that Anabasis is all about reversals. Anakin and Obi-Wan’s relationship starts incredibly badly. But this may end up being the one universe where it actually ends well. They have a lot to get through first, though. And I doubt they’ll ever be BFFs (for one thing, each of them already has people who fill that role), but they may eventually become friends.

I Am A Man Upon The Land-Chapter 2

[AO3]

[Chapter 1]

With this chapter, this fic is complete, but I’m not done with the selkie au! Stay tuned, eventually, for a companion fic from Ford’s perspective set at the end of the summer.

Many thanks to @thesnadger for beta-ing! Any run-on sentences that remain are because I ignored her advice :)


Sometimes he thought he was going mad. Sometimes other people did too, and he had to sit in terrifyingly sterile rooms and describe splotches of ink, and he began to wonder what it said about him that he’d immediately thought that the marking on the old sealskin was a crystal ball.

He lied to everyone about what happened so that they’d believe him. The paper printed an obituary that said his mother had drowned, but he always just said that she’d left. Taken his twin brother and run.

“Why didn’t she take you, too?” one of the doctors asked.

“She couldn’t,” said Stan, and refused to elaborate.

Keep reading

Lana Del Rey on Community Service

In her years in New York, working “odd jobs” and “helping out in the community, in alcohol and drug awareness programs” and playing the singer-songwriter open-mic circuit.  

“I’m not a trained social worker. I’ve been sober for ten years, so it was drug and alcohol rehabilitation. It was more traditional twelve-step call stuff. Just people who can’t get it together, me and groups of other people who have been based in New York for a long time working with people who need help and reached out. It was about building communities around sobriety and staying clean and stuff like that. That was my focus since I moved to the Bronx when I was eighteen. I liked music, but I considered it to be a luxury. It wasn’t my primary focus: the other stuff was really my life. But no one ever … it’s not interesting.”

“I’ve been really involved in my community for the last seven years that I’ve been here, in lots of different ways. I’ve been involved in homeless outreach for the last seven years. Drug and alcohol awareness – I don’t drink, I don’t do drugs anymore. When things aren’t going that well musically, you know … I stopped focusing on music for a long time so I started focusing on other things that I knew more about. Some volunteering. I have a group of friends who work individually with different affiliations. Just in New York, just in the last seven years. When I realized that maybe singing wasn’t going to be so easy I went back to what I knew how to do, what I was also really passionate about. There’s not many things, but …”

No, it’s really interesting. So your social work was based on your own experiences?

“Yeah, because I was an addict who got clean.”

“It’s all about the writing. It used to all be about the service work through the drug and alcohol rehabilitation, which I haven’t worked in in two years now. But it’s always been about the art.”

“When I was 19, I signed to an independent record label. I was the only act on their roster, and then that record was shelved. After that, I still wanted to sing, but I started focusing on being an active member of my community.” “Homeless outreach and drug rehabilitation - that’s been my life the past few years. My friends are a core group of girls I met through work, and they never really knew I was a singer, because nothing was ever happening.”

“Part of it is homeless outreach- helping people get their social security numbers back, so they can apply for jobs again. There are other divisions of it, like imparting knowledge I have about how to make things easier in your life. It’s something I do with a small group of people I’ve known since I was 18.”

A lot of the fandom seems to love the idea of Stiles cooking, but why does no one talk about secret family recipes?

The Stilinski family pączki recipe is top secret, alright? Passed down from generation to generation, but so closely guarded that Stiles’ babcia wouldn’t even let his father teach it to Claudia until they’d been married five years and she was certain Claudia wasn’t going to flake off. Stiles first helped his babcia make them when he was eight during Carnival, and has had the recipe memorized since he was twelve. And, as per tradition, he’s never shared it with anyone.

Until Sophomore year of college, while drunk at a frat party. Whoops.

When he wakes up the next morning, all he can remember is that drunk!Stiles apparently had a craving that could only be satisfied by pączki and someone – dark hair, perfect stubble, goddamn beautiful eyes – had sweetly offered to help him make them in the Alpha Kappa Lambda kitchen.

Which means that now Stiles is pretty much going to have to marry the dude unless he wants his babcia to murder them both for propriety’s sake. Propriety, alright? It has nothing to do with the guy’s adorable bunny teeth. Really.

A Cinderella-type search and wooing ensues. (Derek argues that the only reason he agrees to this madness is the amazing pączki. Not because Stiles is cute or anything.)