twelve feet deep the front bottoms

Twelve Feet Deep
The Front Bottoms
Twelve Feet Deep

Cause you are water twelve feet deep and I am boots made of concrete
We’ll wear cool clothes that show some skin
Flash a fake, so we’ll both get in
Now we’re dancing, we’re so drunk
We are so cool, we are so punk

And yes, we can keep living like this.
As long as you’re here I will live like this.

Since when did “I wanna hear your voice” not become a good excuse?
Calling you three in the morning, laugh at sleep that we’ll both lose

Caesar and Vercingetorix (Gallic Wars: part 5)

Vercingetorix throws down his arms at the feet of Julius Caesar. Painting by Lionel Royer.

In 53 BC, when Caesar had left for Italy after the summer campaign season, the Gallic tribes rebelled under the leadership of Vercingetorix, who raised an army against the Roman legions still wintering in Gaul. Hearing of the rebellion, Caesar crossed the mountains in the south, digging through snow drifts six feet deep, to rejoin his troops. “The very vigour and speed of his march in such wintry conditions,” says Plutarch, “was a sufficient advertisement to the natives that an unconquered and unconquerable army was bearing down upon them” (XXVI.3). To deprive the Romans of food and supplies, Vercingetorix had ordered a scorched-earth policy, and all the neighboring villages and farms were burned, “until fires were visible in all directions.” But one tribe, already having torched twenty towns in a single day, refused to destroy its capital at Avaricum (Bourges), “almost the finest in Gaul, the chief defense and pride of their state.”

Vergingetorix relented and set about to help defend the fortified town, which held a large supply of grain so desperately needed by the Romans. Caesar began a siege that lasted twenty-seven days. It now was early spring 52 BC, and, in spite of incessant rain, two wheeled towers, eighty-feet high, and ramps 330 feet long, over which they could be rolled into place, as well as a high siege terrace, were constructed in less than a month. The Gauls did all they could to counter or destroy the siege works. As the towers increased in height, so the defenders raised their own. They attacked the soldiers at work and tunneled under the terrace to undermine it. As the terrace approached the height of the wall, the defenders became desperate. Caesar writes that “They felt that the fate of Gaul depended entirely on what happened at that moment, and performed before our eyes an exploit so memorable that I felt I must not leave it unrecorded.” It was almost midnight when they again had dug under the terrace and set it on fire. Opposite one of the towers, a Gaul was throwing pitch and tallow onto the fire when he was killed by an arrow from a catapult. Another man stepped forward to take his place and he, too, was killed. Another came forward and also was killed. This continued throughout the night until the fire finally was extinguished.

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