tweaked some things

hI SCHool is coming for me and im transferring to a Very Expensive School and also i’m too lazy to do commissions so i’m making adoptables instead

INFO/RULES:

  • $33 each
  • no holds
  • i only accept paypal!!
  • do not resell these
  • first come first serve
  • send me an ask if interested!
  1. SOLD
  2. SOLD
  3. SOLD
  4. OPEN
  5. SOLD

if you don’t wanna buy these you can also just donate to my paypal(jremonde2000@yahoo.com) or reblog this i’d deeply appreciate it <3

thanks for reading have a nice day!!

HIP HOP UNIT Unreleased Track
SEVENTEEN Hip Hop Unit (Diamond Edge D-2)
HIP HOP UNIT Unreleased Track

NOT THE FULL SONG  / please don’t re-upload

3

Ink! Sans

INK! Done! Paaaiinnnt….sooo much fun…Probly my favorite pic to date~ 

ALSO! Tweaked around some things and played with some lighting tips and debris sparks to make it pop a bit more; I just discovered an artist called Ross Draws, he’s my new senpai…! Just the way he really explodes his art by incorporating complimentary colors and action shots to frame the shape…LUV HIM.

~SPEEDPAINT~

I’m a really good swimmer…

I just had a stray thought about this line today and it just made me laugh because I just realized that swimming for Garnet isn’t actually swimming? She just walks along the bottom of things: pools, the ocean, volcanoes, etc. and calls it swimming. So I ended up drawing this and going overboard bc I wanted to play with colors uvu;;

But it’s still a good way to kick off the first day of Spring Break at least!

2

It was a slow, busy week so I didn’t get as much done as I wanted to. I’m a working on an animatic, along side making the “updated” designs of all the characters. Just tweaking some things here and there, and unifying the color palette. Thanks for your support and stay tune for more updates~!

Skull-Kidz! © Valeria M

Want to see more cool stuff?
Support my Patreon if you like my artwork and get a ton of exclusive content,  
Patreon: [https://www.patreon.com/lunaartgallery]
Thank you~

Beta: Tomorrow 9/29/2017

Here’s an announcement regarding the beta launch tomorrow!

We’re shooting for an 8 PM EST launch time. Once 8 PM EST rolls around, you’ll be able to register your account and create your primary username. Sometime in the next week we’ll make it so that non-users can access the site as well, but we mainly want to make sure that everything is working right for you guys first, and especially want to make sure that the servers don’t get too overloaded while you’re all registering. Remember that there’s no rush to register, since you’ll all have plenty of time to play around in the beta before the official launch in December!

Some housekeeping notes:

1. Not all features will be available yet tomorrow. If you are a user with high anxiety, I would recommend waiting or at least exercising caution. Tagging has been disabled while we tweak some things, as are the filters. This means that everything is going to be unfiltered and, by extension, a little hectic! Stick to private groups if you want to control your content.

2. Things will look a little bit rough around the edges. This is to be expected! A lot of the early aspects of a site beta involve getting everything working first, then polishing over times. Expect things to break on occasion as we implement features, but make sure to report it to us!

3. Part of the beta is going to involve load testing. If things slow down, report it to us! We’ll need that feedback so that we know what needs to be upgraded and tweaked.

4. If you find a feature is missing, don’t panic! It is on the way and will be implemented once we’re confident in it. Remember to keep an eye on our public Discord, our Trello, our Wiki, and the official site forum and site group once we’re live to keep track of updates!

Remember that we are a small team, but we’re dedicated to bringing WritScrib to all of you. Thank you so much for your patience and kindness as we have prepared the beta. I can’t wait to see you all tomorrow!

That’s all for now. Thank you!

2

remade nicos so i present to you: Nicos 3.0–Now with mods! (eyebrows, complexion, eyes)

anonymous asked:

Hi, I hear someone saying that Hunger Games isn't immersive, and I was wondering what is an immersive universe and is it something I should be writing? And if so, how do I go about doing it? Thanks!

This is a perfectly fascinating question, and I think it deserves some time unpacking it. So, what is an immersive universe?

Immersive: relating to…images that actively engage one’s senses and may create an altered mental state; relating to activity that occupies most of one’s attention, time, or energy. (x)

What this boils down to is that an immersive universe is a world that so completely captures a reader’s imagination and attention that they may begin to daydream, lose track of time, lose a sense of surrounding, gain selective hearing, and all the other symptoms that come right along with being completely absorbed in something. “Immersive” can describe anything from a task requiring intense concentration (to the point that you block out everything else to facilitate that concentration) such as data entry, all the way to things like video games that so completely suck a person in that they lose three hours of their time without noticing it. If a game is immersive, it’s considered to be so well-designed, well-written, and well-executed that it draws the player in and allows the player to imagine themselves within the game. There are no oddities or awkwardness, things that distance the player or jolt them from the game. It’s a highly desirable aspect to any piece of fiction because you’ve created a world that appears seamless.

Consider the definition for world-building which I talked about back in Part One of that series:

World building: The construction of a world, especially a convincing fictional world for literature, etc.

If a world is so completely seamless that is becomes immersive, it could also be described as convincing, could it not? If your goal is to create a convincing world, then immersive should also be one of those goals. Alright, so immersive is a good thing–so good that it makes your readers want to come back for more. But how do we get there? What makes a piece of fiction immersive?

Your world:

So you’ve got a pretty unique world set up. That’s cool. How are you going to bring it to life on the page? In order for your story to be immersive, your audience has to be able to see it, live in it, understand it. That means that your job as the author to world-build effectively is paramount. You’ll need to figure out the delicate balance between your world-building within the narrative as well as your story. Sharing details about the world will help folks be able to envision where and who your characters are.

Describing characters and settings and pertinent political/cultural/religious/social details as needed without going too overboard will be key, since you want them to be able to understand the world without overloading them with too much of the nitty-gritty. Entice them before you dump a whole heap before them. Make sure the characters feel like they belong in the world you’re creating and that the world feels like it could conceivably exist. If you have a man toting a six-shooter in a world where so far only swords and daggers have been seen, your reader is going to feel a bit uncomfortable, and that out-of-place-ness will drag them right out of whatever immersion you were able to create before that. A woman in the 1300s whipping out a cellphone, for example, would probably be jarring enough for a reader to remember they’re looking at words on a page, not directly through a screen to their imagination.

Your characters:

If your characters aren’t interesting and believable as real human beings, your audience won’t see them that way. They’ll constantly be seated a bit further back from the story, rather than directly in it, because they don’t feel like their connection with the character is genuine, or that the character itself is genuine. This does not mean that all your characters need to be sympathetic, but the more understandable they are, the more relateable they’ll be (even if your readers can’t say, “That’s me!” they will still be able to relate in a way that’s perhaps more like, “I know someone like that.”). The more understandable they are, the easier it will be for your readers to imagine that character in other situations, which will help them to feel as though they’ve connected with your world.

Your style:

Think about the style of your storytelling, as well. First person is often thought to be the easiest to evoke an immersive quality since by virtue of placing the “I” in a reader’s mind, the reader will begin to associate with that character, but it’s certainly not the only way. Creating an engaging voice to your piece by picking words that create mood and tone will help the reader to feel the settings of the piece. (I’ve read some pieces that were so thick with suspense and humidity I could literally feel the damp on my skin and my hairs raise on my arm.) Alongside picking your words and creating your style, remember that using too many words that folks have to look up will pull the reader right out of the story and right back into their living room, looking for their phone. Overly complex writing styles will cause this, too. No sentence should have to be read twice to understand, so in your editing make sure there are no moments where you have to clarify to yourself how to read a sentence. Keeping your metaphors from being too outlandish will help keep from jarring a reader, too.

Remember that reader-experience is different every time: 

Look. You asked specifically about The Hunger Games and its immersive ability. I don’t have an answer for that one. While I never had a trouble envisioning the world, I also wouldn’t have called it immersive. I didn’t feel it. What would have helped with that? I don’t know, probably style for me. But for you and those you were talking with? Who knows. Maybe they were immersive for you. Maybe your stomach twisted when Katniss and Peeta held those berries; maybe you held your ear when those supplies outside the cornucopia exploded; maybe you dreamed of the mines of District 12. I don’t know. Like with all writing things, it’s individual and there’s no tried-and-true, right-and-wrong way to do any of this. Write with feeling, write with vision, write with passion and hopefully your audience will pick up on that, too. If your beta readers tell you it feels a bit wooden and they couldn’t lose themselves in it quite as easily, go back and look at some things. Tweak your style, first off–that’s usually the biggest road block to immersion. Right now I’m reading a story that’s very heavily stylized–very interesting in terms of execution, but not easy to dissolve into because of that stylization. Is that wrong? Maybe. Maybe not. It depends on the reader and how the story hits them at the time they’re reading it. Never dismiss the criticism, but never believe it’s the end-all-be-all about your story, either. I hope this has helped a bit, Anon. Good luck! -Pear