tw:-lobotomy

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At the age of 12, Howard Dully was subjected to the unnecessary procedure of a lobotomy, thanks in part to his stepmother, who couldn’t handle a normal pre-teen boy. Dr. Walter Freeman, the man behind the disturbing practice of lobotomies, claimed that Howard had childhood schizophrenia and claimed a lobotomy would cure him of such. However, when other doctors that have seen him never came to that diagnosis. It has taken Howard decades to recover from the surgery. He lived his life in institutions, he was incarcerated, homeless and became an alcoholic. He eventually sobered up and went on to get a college degree. He has since researched what happened to him and has even written his memoirs, with the help of Charles Flemming, and turned it into a book titled “My Lobotomy.” He is now a talk show host on National Public Radio, where he speaks to other lobotomy victims.

In 1949 the Portuguese neurologist Antônio Caetano de Abreu Freire Egas Moniz was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine with the Swiss physiologist Walter Hess. At the 1935 International Neurological Conference in London, Moniz encountered the work of Fulton and Jacobsen who had observed behavioural changes in chimpanzees following removal of the frontal lobes. Together with Almeida Lima, Moniz initially adapted the technique for humans by drilling holes in the skull and injecting alcohol into the frontal lobes. The procedure of parietal prefrontal leucotomy was later developed, involving severing fibre tracts between the thalamus and the frontal lobes with a retractable wire loop or ‘leucotome’. The American psychiatrist Walter Freeman further developed this by accessing the frontal lobes through the eye sockets (trans-orbital leucotomy or lobotomy). The procedure was eventually abandoned as a therapy for schizophrenia with the advent of the phenothiazines. Dr Egas Moniz became an invalid and retired (1945) after he was shot in the spine by one of his patients. He died in Lisbon in 1955.

Lobotomy
The idea behind psychosurgery is that severe forms of mental illness (schizophrenia being the most common) can be treated by changing the way the brain works. Doctors believed that by severing the connections of the frontal lobes or prefrontal cortex, had to the rest of the brain, they could calm patients’ emotions and stabilize their personalities without doing away with their intelligence and motor functions. The lobotomy was granted the Nobel Prize and is still a controversial subject to this day!

Source: How Lobotomies Work, Shanna Freeman

Lobotomy!

A lobotomy is a form of psychosurgery that consists of severing a series of connections to and from the prefrontal cortex in an effort to reduce the symptoms of mental ailments.

The procedure made it difficult for patients to emote and function physically.

Few patients were able to return to work or everyday after a lobotomy. Most other patients suffered brain damage, committed suicide, or died as a result.

Rosemary Kennedy

Rose Marie “Rosemary” Kennedy (September 13, 1918 – January 7, 2005) was the first daughter born to Rose Fitzgerald and Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. She was born with intellectual disabilities, though this remained a family secret for decades due to stigma. She was the first sister of President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and Senator Ted Kennedy. She underwent a prefrontal lobotomy at age 23, which left her permanently incapacitated. Read more

Drew this a few days ago (and yes, it’s a nod to Emilie Autumn’s art), because at the time I thought it was funny. I obviously know a lobotomy in the 40’s was most certainly not $49.99 but I really like how the number sounds in your inner infomercial voice… Anyway, I’m practicing posting my art, so here we go.