tv studios

Hey, remember all those 90s sitcoms where the leading actor is basically just playing a wacky, cartoonishly exaggerated version of themselves, to the point that they don’t even bother to give the character a different name?

What would yours be about?

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Look who’s hosting this week!

Stan ‘The Man’ Lee’s Marvel Cameos (2008-2017)

  • Trial of the Incredible Hulk (1989) - Juror
  • X-Men (2000) - Beach Goer
  • Spider-Man (2002) - Panicked man in crowd
  • Daredevil (2003) - Man reading newspaper on the street corner
  • Hulk (2003) - Security Guard
  • Spider-Man 2 (2004) - Man in crowd fleeing disaster
  • Fantastic Four (2005) - Mailman
  • X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) - Neighbor watering lawn
  • Spider-Man 3 (2007) - Observer in Times Square
  • Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) - Wedding guest
  • Iron Man (2008) - Hugh Hefner lookalike
  • The Incredible Hulk (2008) – Old Man Poisoned by Hulk-blood-contaminated soda
  • Iron Man 2 (2010) – Larry King Lookalike
  • Thor – (2011) Truck Driver Trying to move Mjolnir
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) – 1940s General
  • The Avengers (2012) – Skeptic in New York
  • The Amazing Spider-Man (2012) - School librarian
  • Iron Man 3 (2013) – Beauty Pageant Judge
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013) – Mental Hospital Patient
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) – Smithsonian Exhibit Security Guard
  • The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) - Man in crowd during Graduation
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) – Xandarian Pervert
  • Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.(2014)  – Train Passenger (1×13)
  • Big Hero 6 (2014) - Man in portrait
  • Agent Carter (2015) – Shoeshine Customer (1×04)
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) – Lightweight Veteran
  • Marvel’s Daredevil (2015) - On back wall of NYPD 15th precinct (1x13)
  • Netflix’s The Defenders (2017) – New York Police Officer
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) – Lightweight Veteran
  • Ant-Man (2015) – Bartender in Luis’ Story
  • Marvel’s Jessica Jones (2015) - On wall of NYPD 15th precinct
  • Deadpool (2016) - Nightclub MC
  • Captain America: Civil War (2016) – FexEx Delivery Agent
  • X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) - Citizen looking up at terror
  • Marvel’s Luke Cage (2016) - Man on prevention poster
  • Doctor Strange (2016) – New York Cab Rider
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) – Watcher Spy

BBC newsbeat posting that Harry is “hinting” solo music will be out April 7th and I am laughing like, leave it to this dramatic ass hoe to not put music out at all on 7th of April, what if he is just going to add more and more to this TV trailer and it will end with the dramatic music cutting out, Harry putting on a bright smile, an apron with bright colours as well and then he walks into a TV studio like “Hello ladies, gentlement and non binary, my name is Harry Styles and this is my new cooking show ‘How do you whisk?’“ and he picks up a whisk and the studio audience is applauding

Now Presenting: Brujos

BRUJOS IS A QUEER-OF-COLOR, RADICALLY POLITICIZED WEB SERIES FOLLOWING FOUR GAY LATINO DOCTORAL CANDIDATES–THAT ARE ALSO WITCHES. THEY NAVIGATE MAGIC, SEXUALITY, AND SURVIVING A WITCH-HUNT LED BY A SECRET SOCIETY OF WHITE HETERONORMATIVE MALE DESCENDENTS OF THE FIRST NEW WORLD COLONIZERS.

Installment 1: The Devil

Episode 1: Aries

Episode 2: Taurus

Episode 3: Gemini 

Episode 4: Cancer

TV can be art. TV can be revolutionary. TV can be popular entertainment AND incite critical dialogue. Audiences are hungry and intelligent enough for challenging work. This describes the philosophy behind BRUJOS, a counter-hegehmonic web series. Produced by Open TV (beta), conceived, written and directed by Ricardo Gamboa and to be shot by cinematographer Ben Kolak, BRUJOS is a queer-of-color web series.

BRUJOS blends the Latin American soap opera, American sitcom, and critical theory as it follows a coven of four queer Latino doctoral candidates as they learn magic, indulge in nightlife, navigate intimate relationships, and write seminar papers all while trying to survive a witch-hunt. These young protagonists confront histories and realities of racial and gendered inequality as they battle the secret society of white, heteronormative male descendants of the first New World colonizers behind the witch-hunt. Twelve, seven-minute episodes corresponding to signs of the zodiac cycle have been developed through queer men of color testimony; interviews with actual practitioners of divination and magic, i.e. psychics, santeras, tarot readers, etc.; and with academics of cultural studies, performance studies, and queer theory.

BRUJOS addresses the current the landscape of television: Gay men and people of color are more apparent than ever in mainstream television. Sitcoms like “Blackish” and “Fresh Off The Boat” depict families of color attaining the American dream. Programs such as “Looking” and “Modern Family” feature middle and upper class white gay men searching for love or functioning as an all-American family. While these shows are representational achievements, they are not revolutionary ones.

In these cases, ethnic, racial and sexual minorities are portrayed in ways that support dominant culture, narratives, values and relationality. Commercial television studios and networks preoccupied with “scale” and “big data” seldom produce aesthetically or politically challenging work to secure mass viewership. This only further marginalizes non-normative people who’s lives, realities, and stories do not fit within their depictions and who devise new ways of being under the pressures of inequality that are never affirmed.

Moreover, Chicago has become a hotbed for television production. However, series such as Chicago P.D. reiterate stereotypes of people of color as criminals. Mega-hit EMPIRE provides more complex portrayals but it’s get-rich-or-die-trying messaging is consistent with popular culture. Too often work that offers alternative images, narratives, and values is not seen as viable by mainstream producers.

For such reasons, Stephanie Jeter moved from big budget television producing to assume a critical and creative approach to television production. Jeter’s commitment to working with independent artists led her to BRUJOS. BRUJOS was conceived by Ricardo Gamboa, an award-winning “artivist” committed to creating work outside institutional frameworks. Gamboa began development for BRUJOS in 2014 through informal interviews with queer Latino men and healers and psychics.