turning 21

npr.org
Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'
The activist campaigned to change rules, so that people with disabilities could get nursing care and other support at home past the age of 21, and get married without losing Medicaid benefits.

Disability Rights Activist Nick Dupree Fought Alabama For Continued Care : Shots - Health News : NPR - Dupree had a severe neuromuscular disease and was living in Mobile, Ala. He was in a wheelchair and depended on a respirator to breathe. The state paid for nurses to come into his home — even take him to college classes. But that care was about to end the day he turned 21. He faced going to a nursing home, where he feared he would die.

Every state has a program that pays for care for severely disabled children to live at home, but not every state continues that care into adulthood. When Dupree was 19, he started Nick’s Crusade — an online campaign to change the rules in Alabama.

Just a few days before his 21st birthday, he won. In 2008, he decided to move to New York City.

“I assisted him moving to New York, which was very, very scary for me,” says Dupree’s mother, Ruth Belasco. “But, I figured that his joy would outweigh my fear.”

6

D-1 until #happyRAVIday - Bomb Stage

💣💣💣

Bonus: Ravi’s Hanbok Performance 😀

@gambalt

I DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU
BUT I’M FEELING TWENTY-TWO !!
(happy birthday i hope u have a good 22cd pal)

Imagine waking Woozi up on his birthday with some kisses and a warm cup of coffee. Then, seeing his groggy face turn into a happy one after realizing who woke him up and for what reason.