tumblrarians

vine

Kudos to the Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic Unversity for their sweet Vine, showing off the rare book The Tunnel Calamity, by Edward Gorey.
What a rad way to show off the benefit and joy of a paper book while existing on the internet! High fives all around.

Tumblr’s Year in Review did not include any libraries or archives on its year end lists. We have seen some absolutely fabulous posts and gifs this year from the library and archival community, so we thought it would be fun to share some of our favorite library and archives Tumblrs.

In no particular order:

Tumblarians! Share some of your favorite library and archives tumblrs. Who knows, maybe we can get our own category next year!

Note: This post reflects my personal opinion and is not meant as criticism for Tumblr (who we love very much).

Who's speaking at Annual?
Jane McGonigal starts Annual off as the Opening General Session speaker

Friday, June 27th, 4:00pm - 5:15pm

LVCC Exhibit Hall C1

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Jane McGonigal believes game designers are on a humanitarian mission; her #1 goal in life is to see a game developer win a Nobel Peace Prize. This world-renowned and inspiring designer of alternate reality games— games that are designed to improve real lives and solve real problems—will get you excited from the very first session of Annual Conference about the myriad possibilities for how serious games can be integrated into a variety of library programming.

McGonigal specializes in games that challenge players to tackle real-world problems, including poverty, hunger and climate change, through planetary-scale collaboration. She’s a New York Times bestselling author (Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World, Penguin Press, 2011) and inventor/ co-founder of SuperBetter, a game that has already helped more than 250,000 players tackle health challenges such as depression, anxiety, chronic pain, and traumatic brain injury. She has created and deployed award-winning games, sports, and secret missions in more than 30 countries on six continents, for partners such as the New York Public Library, American Heart Association, International Olympics Committee, and World Bank Institute. Her best-known games includes EVOKE, Superstruct, World Without Oil, Cruel 2 B Kind, Find the Future, and The Lost Ring, featured in the New York Times, Wired, and The Economist, and on MTV, CNN, and NPR.

Also a future forecaster, McGonigal is the Director of Games Research & Development at the Institute for the Future, a non-profit research group. She is the founder of Gameful, “a secret headquarters for worldchanging game developers,” and has consulted and developed internal game workshops for Fortune 500 and Global 500 companies. A frequent speaker including at TED and the New Yorker Conference, she has keynoted SXSW interactive, the Game Developers Conference, the Idea Festival, the National Association of Broadcasters, the Web 2.0 Summit, UX Week, Webstock, and more.

Sponsored by Penguin Group

See more highlights.

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Behold! The Acid-free Archival Tree

This holiday tree will warm the hearts of librarians and archivists everywhere.  It is constructed of spare acid-free pamphlet boxes and decorated with garlands of old catalog cards and bookplates. The topper is a spool of cotton binding tape.  For color, we added a few thank you notes received from patrons over the years.

Our student assistants think this is the nerdiest thing they’ve ever seen.

What do you think, libraryjournal?

americanlibrariesmagazine.org
The Stereotype Stereotype | American Libraries Magazine
Why are we interested in, invested in, and driven to change librarian stereotypes, especially concerning fashion, sexuality, and subcultural membership?

Once upon a time, like nursing and secretarial work, librarianship was a sausage-fest. Over time, it became clear that a) women were equally (if not more) competent, equally (if not more) educated, and could be payed a much lower wage. 


And thus the march of librarian stereotypes began. This article is a great history of both the history of the stereotypes, and the evolution of the profession. Give it a read. It’s good for you. 


My thoughts: there are professions that have become highly stigmatized over the years due to the number of women in the field. Teaching, nursing and librarianship to name a few. Obviously they can’t be as valid as male jobs, because (feminist rant) anything a woman does is lesser, by virtue of a male doing it. This is why (white) women make 70 cents to every dollar made by a white male. The money made by women of color is even less. 


As for librarianship–you know this is true. You are not going to get rich being a librarian. You may be an academic librarian and considered faculty, but you will make less than other non-tenure faculty. You may be a public librarian, but will make less than someone else working for local government with the same level of education and experience. 


Another fun fact about librarianship: most librarians are women. Most library administrators are men. 


During the selection process (and even internal promotion process) males are seen as instantly more competent. This isn’t even conscious in most cases. It is a prejudice that runs so deep that administrators and boards don’t even know they’re doing it. Most of the people on that hiring board may even be female. 


Gaining respect for a female dominated field is hard. Other fields, like STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) are very difficult for women to break into, and stay in. The level of exclusion and harassment (this is a MAN’s field, after all) is more than some women are willing to put up with at the high school and college level, much less in graduate or doctoral programs. 


Librarian stereotypes aren’t just about what we look like, or what we wear, or our sexuality. It’s about gender, race, glass ceilings, equal treatment, misogyny and fair pay. It’s depressing, complicated, and I could write a book on it. 

Last week, the Internet Archive announced that 2.6 million images extracted from the Archive’s public domain eBooks have been uploaded to Flickr Commons. But not just that - they’re tagged and they include about 500 words surrounding the image. So full-text searches of images, basically. Oh, and that 2.6 million images is just the first batch. There are a total of 14 million images extracted which will ultimately be uploaded to Flickr.

What’s cool, too, is that even though not all the images are on Flickr yet, browsing can lead you to more images at the Archive itself. For instance, there’s an amazing series of books at the Archive I discovered via the Flickr account called Reminiscences about Abraham Lincoln, which are newspaper clippings and recollections cataloged by the last name of the people included. The “Wi” section (surnames beginning with “Wi”) is on Flickr, but only a handful of the images are uploaded so far. But on the main page for any of the images on Flickr (like this, for example), you can find the link to the Archive page, with the full volume.

Anyway, long story short: that’s how I found the image above, and this week I’ll be posting finds from the Internet Archive’s Flickr account, or finds that began with browsing the Flickr account!

Drummer Boy, Now 80, Regrets Lincoln Didn’t Spank Him At 14
Philadelphia Ledger, February 12, 1931