tulsa riots

White History Month

A Caucasian co-worker and I(Yup! The same one from the last post. Go figure.) were discussing why there should or shouldn’t be a “White History Month”. Nevermind the fact that EVERY MONTH is White History month. But I decided to humor him and play along…

“There should be White History Month” so we can expose all the evil things white folks have done in history and present that still affect the victims and their descendants till this very day like:

1 Cherokee Trail of Tears
2 Japanese American internment
3 Philippine-American War
4 Jim Crow
5 The genocide of Native Americans
6 Transatlantic slave trade, and the lies that Africans sold other Africans into slavery
7 The Middle Passage
8 The history of White American racism
9 Black Codes
10 Slave patrols
11 Ku Klux Klan
12 The War on Drugs
13 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
14 How white racism grew out of slavery and genocide
15 How whites still benefit from slavery and genocide
16 White anti-racism
17 The Southern strategy
18 The rape of enslaved women
19 Madison Grant
20 The Indian Wars
21 Human zoos
22 How the Jews became white
23 White flight
24 Redlining
25 Proposition 14
26 Homestead Act
27 Tulsa Riots
28 Rosewood massacre
29 Tuskegee Experiment
30 Lynching
31 Hollywood stereotypes
32 Indian Appropriations Acts
33 Immigration Act of 1924
34 Sundown towns
35 Chinese Exclusion Act
36 Emmett Till
37 Vincent Chin
38 Islamophobia
39 Indian boarding schools
40 King Philip’s War
41 Bacon’s Rebellion
42 American slavery compared to Arab, Roman and Latin American slavery
43 History of the gun
44 History of the police
45 History of prisons
46 History of white suburbia
47 Lincoln’s racism and anti-racism
48 George Wallace Governor of Alabama
49 Cointelpro
50 Real estate steering
51 School tracking
52 Mass incarceration of black men
53 Boston school busing riots
54 Man made Ebola and A.I.D.S.
55 Church Bombings and fires in deep south to Blacks
56 Church Shootings
57 How the Irish and Italians became white
58 The Perpetuation of the idea of the “model minority”
59 Housing discrimination
60 Systematic placement of highways and building projects to create ghettos
61. Medical experimentation on poor poc especially Blacks including surgical and gynecological experimentation
62 History of Planned Parenthood
63 Forced Sterilization
64 Cutting children out of pregnant Black mothers as part of lynchings
65 Eurocentric beauty standard falsification
66 Erasure and eradication of all achievements of Ancient Africa and Kemet
67 White washing of history and cultural practices of poc’s
68 Media manipulation and bias
69 Perpetuation of the myth of reverse racism
70 The history of white cannibalism
71 White fragility
72 White on white crime and white on everybody else crime
73 Irish slavery, Jewish slavery, African slavery, Native American slavery
74 White police officers murdering unarmed men, women, and children and not being convicted for it
75 Population control warfares worldwide
76 Chemtrails
77 Oil spills and chemical dumping in oceans worldwide
78 Water fracking
79 Gmo foods worldwide
80 Monsanto
81 World Wars 1 and 2
82 Wars on indigenous peoples throughout the world
83 Stolen inventions and blueprints from African people and other indigenous people worldwide
84 Steal concepts from cultures worldwide and then corrupt it
85 Mass murders and massacres worldwide
86 Eugenics and the history of sterilization of poc and history of fetal abortions worldwide
87. Flint Michigan water poisoning crisis

and too much more….

Yet you all have convinced the world and your delusional selves that melanated human beings “black” people are perceived as dangerous, unruly, racist, uncivilized, thugs, gangsters etc… Yeah ok not according to historical and present day facts.

Needless to say… We don’t have these types of discussions anymore. 😎😉😂

Stacey Dash Says Why No White History Month

There should be White History Month in America. That way we can teach all the things Americans have done in history, like:
1 Cherokee Trail of Tears
2 Japanese American internment
3 Philippine-American War
4 Jim Crow
5 The genocide of Native Americans
6 Transatlantic slave trade
7 The Middle Passage
8 The history of White American racism
9 Black Codes
10 Slave patrols
11 Ku Klux Klan
12 The War on Drugs
13 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
14 How white racism grew out of slavery and genocide
15 How whites still benefit from slavery and genocide
16 White anti-racism
17 The Southern strategy
18 The rape of enslaved women
19 Madison Grant
20 The Indian Wars
21 Human zoos
22 How the Jews became white
23 White flight
24 Redlining
25 Proposition 14
26 Homestead Act
27 Tulsa Riots
28 Rosewood massacre
29 Tuskegee Experiment
30 Lynching
31 Hollywood stereotypes
32 Indian Appropriations Acts
33 Immigration Act of 1924
34 Sundown towns
35 Chinese Exclusion Act
36 Emmett Till
37 Vincent Chin
38 Islamophobia
39 Indian boarding schools
40 King Philip’s War
41 Bacon’s Rebellion
42 American slavery compared to Arab, Roman and Latin American slavery
43 History of the gun
44 History of the police
45 History of prisons
46 History of white suburbia
47 Lincoln’s racism and anti-racism
48 George Wallace Governor of Alabama
49 Cointelpro
50 Real estate steering
51 School tracking
52 Mass incarceration of black men53 Boston school busing riots
54. Jim Crow
55Church Bombings and fires in deep south to Blacks
56. Church Shootings
57. How the Irish and Italians became white
58. The Perpetuation of the idea of the “model minority”
59. Housing discrimination
60. Systematic placement of highways and building projects to create ghettos
61. Medical experimentation on poor poc especially Blacks including surgical and gynecological experimentation
62. History of Planned Parenthood
63. Forced Sterilization
64. Cutting children out of pregnant Black mothers as part of lynchings
65. Eurocentric beauty standard falsification
66. Erasure and eradication of all achievements of Ancient Africa and Kemet
67. White washing of history and cultural practices of pocs
68. Media manipulation and bias
69. Perpetuation of the myth of reverse racism
70. The history of white cannibalism
71. White fragility
72. Man made Ebola and A.I.D.S.

9

DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLACK TULSA? IF NOT… WHY NOT?

This horrific incident has been well documented, everywhere: from YouTube videos of survivor interviews to PBS Lesson Plans for school teachers. Please do your Google diligence:

  • From May 30 to June 1, 1921, white citizens of Tulsa bombed burned and shot up the “Little Africa” section of Tulsa FOR 18 HOURS STRAIGHT
  • Why would they do that? That same old lame excuse, a Black man supposedly did something to a white woman. But the real reason was ECONOMIC JEALOUSY. Whites may have called it Little Africa derisively, but there is a reason that Black Tulsa is known as Black Wall Street
  • In addition to the 300 Blacks killed, and over 1,000 residential homes burned to the ground, also destroyed were:
  • The Mt. Zion Baptist Church and five other churches; the Gurley Hotel, Red Wing Hotel, and Midway Hotel; the Tulsa Star and Oklahoma Sun newspaper offices; Dunbar Elementary School; Osborne Monroe’s Roller-Skating Rink; the East End Feed Store; the Y.M.C.A. Cleaners; the Dreamland Theater; a drug store, barbershop, banquet hall, several grocery stores, dentists, lawyers, doctors, and realtors offices; a U.S. Post Office Substation, as well the all-black Frissell Memorial Hospital. All told, marauding gangs of savage whites destroyed 40-square-blocks of Black economic and entrepreneurial prosperity!

64 years after the first bombing of an American city was committed against the Black residents of Tulsa… the second bombing of an American city took place in Philadelphia when the city bombed the black members of the MOVE organization. (see the blackourstory archive for details). 

Isn’t it a shame that 76 after the bombing of Tulsa, when Timothy McVeigh blew up the Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City, most historically illiterate Americans - including American “journalists” - responded as if it were the first time such a horror had been visited on Oklahoma. If only we knew.

While there are many lessons to be drawn from this, a few questions that stick out to me are these:

  • If the answer to Black second-class treatment from whites in America is supposedly to become the ultimate American capitalists…the ‘model minorities’… how do you explain Tulsa 1921?
  • For those Black folk who think that the sole answer to Black people’s problems is simply more Blacks becoming business owners and more Blacks spending money with other Blacks… how did that work out for our people in Tulsa in '21?
  • Considering not only Tulsa, but Rosewood, Florida, and many other thriving all-Black towns that you may know of that all met the same fate at the hands of murderous, envious, lazy crackers… WHEN ARE WE GOING TO ACKNOWLEDGE AND TAKE SERIOUSLY THE IDEA THAT BLACK WEALTH (ESPECIALLY ALL-BLACK WEALTH) WILL NEED TO BE PROTECTED WITH PHYSICAL FORCE?

There is a reason that Marcus Garvey AND Elijah Muhammad had armies of trained Black men as a huge part of their organizations. Many of us Black folk took those great men as jokes, yet NO BLACK LEADERS SINCE THOSE TWO have reached the same heights of economic and ideological success and unity of Black people. 

Not only do we need to LEARN THIS HISTORY, we need to start taking these events men and movements MORE SERIOUSLY, and doing some CRITICAL HISTORICAL ANALYSIS if we are ever to stop being on the bottom rung of every metric in American life. Not just some casual or accidental reading of history; some CRITICAL. HISTORICAL. ANALYSIS.

We’ve had many examples before us, but were often too undisciplined or brainwashed or lazy to follow them. Shame on us. If even one-fourth of the people who claimed to love Brother Malcolm in his day had at least one-tenth of Malcolm’s discipline, he might not have needed to hire an FBI Agent named Gene Roberts whom he didn’t have time to scrutinize properly beforehand, because all the Black folks who gassed him up to leave the Nation of Islam and who joined Brother Malcolm’s MMI were too damned undisciplined and untrained IN ANYTHING USEFUL TO PROTECTING BLACK PEOPLE to even serve as proper security for him. Read it again, in context of this entire post, and let it marinate.

AMERICA NEEDS TO PAY US WHAT THEY OWE FOR ALL OF THIS TORTURE ROBBERY AND MURDER that they’ve visited on us since they brought our people here as captives and bred us for profit.

TULSA 1921 was real. PHILLY 1985 was real. Will it happen again?

3

June 1st 1921: Tulsa riot

On this day in 1921, the black district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was destroyed by a white mob. The Greenwood district of Tulsa had one of the most affluent black communities in the United States at this time, earning the nickname ‘Black Wall Street’. On May 30th 1921, a young black man called Dick Rowland rode in an elevator with a white woman; false rumours swirled in the white community that Rowland had attempted to assault her. Rowland was arrested on May 31st, and sensationalist newsaper coverage of the incident fuelled talk of lynching. This led to a confrontation between white and black mobs outside the courthouse, which resulted in a gun being discharged, sparking violence. The following day, June 1st, the Greenwood District was looted and burned by white rioters. The governor declared martial law, and National Guard troops were called to quell the violence. Law enforcement officials imprisoned black Tulsans, with over 6,000 people held for days on end; most white rioters, in contrast, were not arrested. In the wake of the violence, 35 city blocks lay in ruins, thousands of African-Americans were left homeless, and over 800 people had been injured. The dead were buried in mass graves, with the toll initially placed at 36, but revised by a 2001 report which rose the estimation to 300 fatalities. This report, which recommended paying reparations to the survivors and victims’ families, was part of a concerted effort in recent years to end the silence about the event. The scale of the violence was covered up at the time, and the incident was omitted from state and national histories. The Tulsa riot was one of a number of attempted ‘racial cleansings’ by white mobs against black communities in the United States, which had the tacit support of law enforcement and government. It is vital that this event, which saw white mobs destroy an entire black neighborhood, is remembered and placed in the long narrative of systemic racism in the United States.

#Repost @blackhistory with @repostapp ・・・ 93 years ago on this day June 1, 1921, the Tulsa Race Riot began. It is marked as the deadliest race riot in the history of the U.S. & destroyed what was known as, Black Wall Street.

Black Wall Street was the wealthiest black community in the United States, full of black owned businesses consisting of: 
movie theaters 
dental offices
independent newspapers
restaurants
grocery stores
a bank
post offices
a bus system
schools
airplanes
law offices 
its own hospital

Racial tension boiled over on May 30, 1921 when a white woman accused a black boy of sexual assault. Late that night, a mob of nearly 10,000 white men launched an all out assault on Black Wall Street systematically burning down every home & business. 
Attacks came from both the ground and the sky as the mobs used planes from World War I to drop firebombs and shoot at residents. African Americans that were captured were held in internment camps around the city by local police & National Guard units.

Blacks who were injured during the 16 hour attack couldn’t seek medical care because the mobs torched the only black hospital in the city.

The attack left about 10,000 African Americans homeless and 35 city blocks burned to the ground. In total, 1,256 houses & 191 businesses (including churches, a middle school & a hospital) were burned. 
In the aftermath, it was estimated that 300 African Americans were killed and many of their bodies were buried in unmarked graves.

The Tulsa Race Riot was taught for the 1st time in Tulsa public schools in 2012. #knowthyself #lovethyself #africanpride #africa #problack #blackart #blacklove #blackisbeautiful #blackexcellence #blackwomen #blackmen #blackkings #blackqueens #blackunity #blackhistory #hotep #ase #sheeple #wakeup #riseup #africa #africanlive #afroncentric #kemet #blackgenocide #mentalslavery #blackconsciousness by 02luvly
https://www.instagram.com/p/BGGjDyHwQUb/
Rappers are ACTORS!

Tulsa Pennies: Remembering the Tulsa Race Massacre

Photo caption:  The race riots of Tulsa, Oklahoma, raged through the thriving black community of Greenwood from May 31 through June 1, 1921.  The violence left at least 300 people dead and scores of businesses destroyed. Ninety-three years later, charred pennies collected shortly after the mayhem ended by young George Monroe – a five-year-old survivor of the riots – have come to the NMAAHC.  Here they will help tell a story of race-based horror and African American resilience.

When curators at the National Museum of African American History and Culture search for a symbol of an event or person, they look for evocative connections that will draw visitors to a time and place that they may know nothing about.

With that expectation, Museum Curator Paul Gardullo has collected charred pennies from the Tulsa Massacre of 1921. They were gathered just after the riots by George Monroe, then a 5-year-old who survived the horrors of the country’s worst race riot on record.

Photo Caption: Photographic postcard of Tulsa race riot, 1921. Collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. 2011.175.3

The pennies came to the museum from Monroe, donated by historian Scott Ellsworth, who befriended Mr. Monroe when writing one of the first histories on the Tulsa Riots, “Death in a Promised Land.” Ellsworth was a friend of Monroe and a student of the esteemed historian Dr. John Hope Franklin, head of the NMAAHC Scholarly Advisory Committee until his death in 2009.

Dr. Franklin also knew and valued this history personally. His father, Buck Colbert Franklin, lost his law office in the riots and successfully fought to have black businesses rebuild in the riot-torn neighborhood. The violence shook a thriving black neighborhood, anchored by so many successful businesses that it was widely known as “Black Wall Street.”

Photo Caption: Photographic postcard of Tulsa race riot, 1921. Collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.2011.175.14

During the riots, both blacks and whites were armed. When a band of white rioters burst into George Monroe’s home, setting fire to the curtains, he hid under a bed with his siblings. When a rioter stepped on his hand, his sister saved his life by putting her hands over his mouth so he couldn’t scream. “When we went outside, there were a lot of bullets flying, commotion and a lot of fires. I remember that as if it was yesterday,” Mr. Monroe recalled when interviewed in the late 1990s before he passed away. Young George and his siblings survived but the family business, a skating rink, was destroyed. When the fires subsided, George Monroe and other boys went up and down the burned out streets picking up pennies.

“Though these objects are humble, Mr. Monroe’s pennies are powerful touchstones that will allow people to remember this violent episode in our nation’s history,” says Gardullo. “Through them and other objects and stories collected from Tulsa families, visitors will come face to face with personal stories of both pain and violence, survival and resilience that will be part of the Museum’s inaugural exhibition focused on “The Power of Place”.

Written by Jackie Trescott.

Tulsa Oklahoma Black Wall Street aka Little Africa

Greenwood is a neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma. As one of the most successful and wealthiest African American communities in the United States during the early 20th Century, it was popularly known as America’s “Black Wall Street” until the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921.

In today's Black History you didn't learn in school, there was a Tulsa Race Riot in 1921. An entire city was burned to the ground due to a racial disturbance and retaliation. It is estimated that more than 300 people were killed overnight during the riot. The thriving city that was once called "Black Wall Street" has never regained its status.

The New Black Wall Street.

“I’m about to create a whole new Black Wall Street. And I promise you that nobody, and I mean nobody, will ever destroy this one” - Lucious Lyon

At the end of a long, gently sloping driveway in Glen Cove, Long Island sits Lucious Lyon’s 32-room mansion, the royal palace from which Lucious has reigned over hip-hop and R&B for the better part of fifteen years. It’s a world away from the midtown Manhattan offices of his legendary Empire Entertainment, and even farther from the dangerous West Philadelphia streets where he first fell in love with music as a child.

And if he has his way, Lucious Lyon is about to journey even farther than that. His next destination is his most ambitious yet: he wants nothing less than to make history.

“They always called me hard-headed when I was coming up,” Lucious says with a warm smile while giving Royal magazine an exclusive tour of his expansive home. “They said I never listened, never paid attention. But they were wrong. I’m always listening. And I pay attention to everything, especially the history of this country.”

As we stroll past his impressive art collection – one that Philadelphia’s Temple University has recently asked him to donate for a temporary exhibition – Lucious makes it clear that he’s a man who keeps one eye on the future as well as the past. He stops before a colorful, floor-to-ceiling Banksy-style rendering of Mickey Mouse in the sun room that catches my eye and tells me with pride that it’s a Skyler Grey.

“If you don’t know who Skyler is,” Lucious grins, “you ain’t as fly as you think you are. I got T-shirts older than him, but the boy is bad.”

It might come as a shock that Lucious’s favorite visual artist is all of 14 years old. But like any good king, he’s not a man easily defined, and his interests and tastes are as varied as anyone you might imagine.

He gestures to a small, yellowed photograph in an elegant silver frame. But this one’s not a piece of art. A closer look reveals it’s a faded newspaper masthead: The Tulsa Tribune, dated May 31st, 1921. Lucious, clearly testing me, asks if I know the significance of the date. I meet his gaze.

“It’s the day the Tulsa Race Riots started,” I reply. Lucious nods, his charming smile replaced by a solemn frown. “That’s right. They burned Black Wall Street to the ground because they couldn’t stand the sight of people who looked like you and me starting their own businesses. And thriving.”

And in that moment, it became clear that there’s very little else you need to know about Lucious Lyon to understand what drives him. That “hard-headed” little boy who “never paid attention” grew into a man who is aware of far more than he’ll ever let on.

And it’s this connection to American history that’s driven him to expand his once-fledgling hip-hop record label into an entertainment juggernaut that very well may achieve something even legends like Berry Gordy and Russell Simmons never could: conquer Wall Street.

But when I say this, Lucious scowls. It’s the first time I’m able to glimpse a bit of the young man who grew up fighting for his life in some of Philadelphia’s roughest neighborhoods.

“No,” he says firmly. “The people who think this is just about ‘conquering’ Wall Street are underestimating me. I’m about to create a whole new Black Wall Street. And I promise you that nobody, and I mean nobody, will ever destroy this one. I put that on my life.”

Lucious’s intensity, and his track record thus far, make it clear that you’d be a fool to bet against him. The days of underestimating Lucious Lyon are clearly over.

It’s taken almost a century, but if Empire Entertainment successfully launches its IPO, Lucious could be well on his way to single-handedly resurrecting Black Wall Street from the flames of Tulsa, Oklahoma. And some of the most prominent investors in the world are already lining up to hear Lucious Lyon roar.

Traumatic Backstory for Black Character in Historical Fiction

Anonymous asked:

Hi, I’m writing a historical-fiction/mystery story that takes place in 1920s America with a panromantic asexual black woman as the main character. She does deal with racism from time to time, though it doesn’t take up a huge part of the plot except for in her backstory. 

When she was a little girl, she lived in an area where lynching was very common, and her parents would occasionally have arguments about whether or not they should move somewhere else. The father didn’t want to leave because the town was where he grew up, he didn’t want to have to go through the struggles of trying to find work again, and he was worried about the costs of traveling(because they didn’t have much money). 

The mother wanted to leave because she was scared for herself, her husband, and their daughter. The murder of the father was what finally prompted the mother to take her daughter and leave for Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she heard good news about its wealthy economy and the successful African-Americans who lived there. 

My protagonist’s backstory also delves into the “Tulsa Race Riot” that happens a few years later, which led her to suffer from ptsd and harbor resentment towards white people as a result. While these incidents did deeply affect my protagonist, they do not define her character and I try my best to flesh her out and give her a well-rounded personality.

My main worry about this is that as a non-black poc, would writing about those particular topics would be inappropriate and overstepping my boundaries? I don’t want to do anything that would be disrespectful, so I’d love some advice. Thank you

I don’t think that by covering these topics you’re automatically overstepping boundaries. It’s how you handle the topics and treat the affected character(s) you’re dealing with.

~Mod Colette

You should do your research and make sure that you handle these issues with understanding. I wouldn’t recommend relying on info dumps or extended flashbacks to tell this aspect of the characters story because it can slow down the overall narrative. 

It’s important that these events connect to how the character acts and reacts in the present time of the story since it’s stated that she has post traumatic stress and resentment. These need to be handled delicately and make logical sense for the character. 

~Mod Najela

“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”…

was NOT a symbolic gesture for the Black citizens of Greenwood, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1921, when the whites of the town decided to violently eradicate all economic competition from Black business owners and run all of the Black folks out of town.

For many of us who are all too familiar with this event in our nation’s history (and numerous others just like it at the hands of heartless, murderous white authorities)… while we understand the modern-day version of this pose is being used to “protest” the same type of disregard for Black lives… this is why we object to posing with our ‘hands up.’

As the photo above correctly notes, what that pose represents is:

Captured Negros…

3

top: 1921 Tulsa Race Riots in O.K.

 When a Black shoe shine man, Dick Rowland, apparently stepped on the foot of Sarah Page, a white elevator operator, causing her to scream, the Tulsa Tribune the next day erroneously reported that he had attempted to rape her. When a white mob tried to disarm of group of 75 Black men, including World War I vets, a shot was fired and the riot had begun. The angry white mob ultimately destroyed more than one thousand homes and businesses in the Greenwood community, according to the Oklahoma State University library. Death toll: Credible estimates of riot deaths range from 50 to 300

middle: 1992 Rodney King Race Riots in L.A.

After Rodney King led police on a high-speed chase through Los Angeles and his beating by four police officers was caught on tape, the officers were acquitted of excessive force. The verdict set off a riot in the Black and Hispanic communities. Death toll: 53 people, with 2,000 injuries.

bottom: 2014 Michael Brown Race Riots in M.O.

White police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed an unarmed 18-year old black man named Michael Brown. Wilson was not indicted for the murder. The verdict set off riots in Ferguson and across the nation. Death toll: Not yet determined.

It didn’t begin with Michael Brown. If we do not continue to demand justice, it will not end with Michael Brown.

anonymous asked:

Know what I'm tired off? People who treat rioters as legitimate protesters and act as if they represent all black people. If they really cared they should put pressure on media to cover the peaceful protests, and call out rioters for what they are: unrelated assholes who hijack protests and ruin them just so they can destroy and steal stuff. Charlotte was violent and nothing has come out of it. Tulsa was peaceful and succeeded. Riots are not the way to go.

^^

vimeo.com
Black Wall Street & The Tulsa Race Riot Of 1921 - the biggest race riot in U.S history they never teach you about

The Tulsa race riot was a large scale racially-motivated conflict between the White and Black communities of Tulsa, Oklahoma, including aerial attack, beginning…

I think I’ll show this in class today. Know the history - our history. The biggest race riot in U.S history they never teach you about