tuesday group

Trump Says "Sometimes It's The Reverse," When Asked About Anti-Semitic Threats And Attacks

WASHINGTON — Asked about the recent wave of anti-Semitic attacks and threats across the nation, President Trump on Tuesday told a group of state attorneys general that “sometimes it’s the reverse,” Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said of Trump’s comments in his and other officials’ meeting with the president.

“He just said, ‘Sometimes it’s the reverse, to make people — or to make others — look bad,’ and he used the word 'reverse’ I would say two to three times in his comments,” Shapiro said. “He did correctly say at the top that it was reprehensible.”

Asked for further information about the purpose of the president’s comments, Shapiro only said, “I really don’t know what he means, or why he said that,” adding that Trump said he would be speaking about the issue in his remarks on Tuesday night.

Saying that he hoped to see clarification from the president in those remarks, Shapiro added, "It didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me.”

White House spokespeople did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, the Senate Minority Leader, said, "That is an absurd and obscene statement.”

The Anti-Defamation League also questioned Trump’s reported remarks.“

We are astonished by what the President reportedly said. It is incumbent upon the White House to immediately clarify these remarks. In light of the ongoing attacks on the Jewish community, it is also incumbent upon the President to lay out in his speech tonight his plans for what the federal government will do to address this rash of anti-Semitic incidents,” Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of ADL, said in a statement. [x]

Minami is strolling by to show off style 23 yet again!

This piece is another in the lineup of Clockwork inspired dresses, this time a sundress based off of Boris Dareaurum Eberhart V - our favorite tempered prince!

Overall, this piece is very satisfying for me, but my favorite aspects are probably her hair and (strangely enough) the picnic basket. Both came out very crisp! (ovo)b

3

Trump suggests anti-Semitic bomb threats against Jewish centers are false flag operations

  • President Donald Trump on Tuesday told a group of state attorneys general the recent bomb threats targeted at Jewish Community Centers across the country were a false flag operation, according to BuzzFeed.
  • Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Schapiro said Trump told the attorneys general, “Sometimes it’s the reverse, to make people – or to make others – look bad,” according to BuzzFeed. Read more (2/28/17 7:19 PM)

i’m sketching out the finer points of a fic where dennis comes out and he and mac start dating but dennis is concerned that they’re not doing the whole “gay” thing properly and that they don’t have enough “status” in the “community” so he signs himself and mac up to volunteer with some lgbt youth, and i guess the community centre is just understaffed enough that they allow mac and dennis to run the tuesday night lgbt youth group all by themselves, and it goes about as well as you can imagine. one girl asks if mac and dennis can give her a ride to goodwill on the weekend to get some feminine clothes and dennis explains that goodwill is full of bedbugs and diseases and they take her on a shoplifting tour of forever 21 and claire’s instead. a boy comes in upset about his father refusing to let him see his boyfriend, and the very next morning that dad walks out to the curb to find his tires slashed and his windows shattered and a single log of poop sitting in the middle of the driver’s seat. one girl is sad because she doesn’t know where to find a girlfriend and mac and dennis take her to a sold-out tegan and sara concert (i.e., sneak her in through the stage door in an elaborate disguise) and proceed to wingman her all night by pretending to be her overenthusiastic gay dads.

vox.com
Republicans’ new #AHCA amendment lets insurers charge sick people more, cover less
Under the latest GOP proposal, insurers could once again charge sick people higher premiums.
By Sarah Kliff

Sarah Kliff at Vox:

House Republicans are floating a new amendment to their health care bill, one that would likely cause even more Americans to lose coverage than the last version.

The American Health Care Act that House Speaker Paul Ryan introduced into the House last February dismantled parts of Obamacare. It also left popular provisions, like a ban on preexisting conditions and the requirement that insurers cover things like maternity care, intact.

This new amendment, offered by Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-NJ), would allow states to waive out of those key Obamacare regulations too.

In particular, this amendment would allow some states to charge higher premiums to Americans with preexisting conditions. States would also have the choice to opt out of the Affordable Care Act’s essential health benefits requirement, as well as the possibility of charging older Americans significantly higher premiums.

Leaders of the staunchly conservative Freedom Caucus have reportedly endorsed this proposal. That makes sense: This amendment would take apart key Obamacare regulations the group has spent years rallying against.

But this amendment doesn’t do much at all to assuage concerns about the older proposals. While it meets many of the demands of the party’s far-right wing — namely, the deregulation of the individual insurance market — it does nothing to address concerns about massive coverage loss. Instead, it likely makes those problems worse.

What’s more, it comes at a time when the specific Obamacare provisions that Republicans want to dismantle are proving the law’s most popular. A Washington Post/ABC News Poll released Tuesday found that 70 percent of voters support requiring states to protect people with preexisting conditions, and 61 percent want the federal government to require insurers to cover a comprehensive benefits package with maternity care and mental health services.

Republicans want to let states waive two key Obamacare provisions

The amendment takes aim at two Obamacare policies that have long been on the Freedom Caucus’s hit list: community rating and essential health benefits.

Before the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies would “individually rate” each patient who wanted to buy coverage on the individual market.

They would send out detailed questionnaires about a potential customer’s age, medical history, and current behaviors (whether she currently smokes, for example, or is pregnant) and then set a specific premium for that person. It was meant to reflect the insurers’ best guess of how expensive that individual’s health care would be.

Obamacare banned this so-called individual rating. It required all insurers, instead, to use “community rating”: setting one premium for the entire community of people buying coverage. This had the practical effect of driving down premiums for sick people, who no longer had to bear the full burden of covering their more expensive health needs.

It also drove up the costs for healthy people, who were suddenly asked to pay more to help cover those expensive bills from the sicker people.

The Obama administration made this change because it felt like this was a good trade-off. It prioritized getting sicker people access to health insurance.

This new GOP amendment to let states waive community rating would once again allow insurers to charge people based on their expected health care costs, so long as the state participates in the Patient and State Stability Fund. This is a pool of money in AHCA that states can use to set up high risk pools or shore up insurers that get stuck with really expensive patients.

Insurers could only charge these fees to people who had a break in health insurance coverage, showing up on the individual market wanting to purchase a plan. The language does not appear to allow an insurer to ask questions about the health status of someone who is transitioning directly from an insurance plan at work, for example, into the individual market.

Republicans’ operating theory here is that it’s okay for states to charge sick people higher premiums so long as they have some kind of fallback option for coverage, like a high-risk pool. But health law expert Tim Jost points out that states don’t have to use their stability funds to create high-risk pools, which means these people could find themselves out of luck.

“The idea was people who fall through the cracks would have a high-risk pool,” he says. “What happens though if a state uses their money for reinsurance instead?”

States could also opt out of Obamacare’s essential health benefits requirement. This is the core set of medical services that the Affordable Care Act requires all insurers to cover, including things like doctor trips, hospital stays, maternity care, and mental health services.

These two Obamacare requirements have been at the top of the Freedom Caucus’s hit list for some time. They also tack a third regulation they want to dismantle onto the list in this new amendment, the one that limits what premiums insurers can charge older enrollees.

The GOP amendment would allow states to opt out of these provisions if they show that the change would lead to “reducing average premiums for health insurance coverage in the State.” If the federal government took no action when these applications came in, the waivers would be automatically approved after 60 days.

This does not set an especially high bar for this waiver option. It means that states could, for example, end the essential health benefits requirement because they believe it will lower premium costs. And of course it would! Tell insurers they no longer have to cover expensive mental health services or maternity care, and average prices would almost certainly drop. The same would happen if insurers had the option to charge sick patients prices they couldn’t afford. Those people would drop out of the market, and premiums would decline.

Here's a list of every US senator that does — and doesn't — pay interns

You can’t get a job without experience, but you also can’t get the experience without a job.

A group called Pay Our Interns is trying to help end the practice of unpaid internships — starting on Capitol Hill. On Tuesday, the group rolled out a database of paid internships in the U.S. Senate. 

Mic took this list and then followed up with senators’ offices to confirm the accuracy of the database and include senators that pay interns but were left off the original list.

U.S. senators currently accepting applications for paid internships (24 total)

Democrats/Independents  

• Delaware Sen. Tom Carper offers summer interns a stipend but not interns in the spring and fall. The deadline is April 21. 

• Hawaii Sen. Brian Schatz's team pays all interns, a spokesman confirmed with Mic via email. Applications are rolling.

• Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono offers travel assistance to some interns that qualify. The deadline is March 31. 

• Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly has two paid legislative internships, the Wayne Townsend and Frank J. Anderson Legislative Programs, which pay a stipend, a spokesman told Mic in an email. The other internships are unpaid. 

• Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren offers small stipends to applicants not receiving college credit for the internship based on need. The deadline is March 15.

• Nebraska Sen. Heidi Heitkamp pays all interns. Applications are considered on a rolling basis. 

• New Mexico Sen. Martin Heinrich pays all interns $12 per hour. The deadline to apply for the summer is March 31.

• New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall’s website says internships are unpaid, but a spokesperson told Mic in an email that interns are either compensated through an outside foundation or a stipend of roughly $10 per hour.

• Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown offers “some limited financial assistance based on need,” which students can request when they submit their applications, according to a spokeswoman.

• Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley offers the Otto and Verdell Rutherford Congressional Internship, a $5,000 stipend for students who couldn’t otherwise afford the opportunity, based on need. The deadline to apply is March 15.

• Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey offers two special paid internships in addition to several other opportunities, which are all unpaid. The deadline is March 15.

• Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders pays all interns $12 per hour. The deadline to apply for the summer is March 17.

• Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine offers stipends to students who do not receive school credit, a spokeswoman confirmed in an email. The deadline is April 14. 

Republicans 

• Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski has an internship program for college students and high-school seniors; both get modest stipends. Deadline is March 16.

• Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake offers two kinds of internships: personal office and judiciary internships. Judiciary interns are paid, a spokesman confirmed to Mic in an email; however, office interns are not.

• Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner’s website lists no compensation information regarding interns, but he has posted a job listing for a paid internship with his re-election campaign. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for clarification.

• Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts pays interns a monthly stipend. Applications are due on March 17. 

• Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul offers either a stipend or college credit to interns. The deadline is March 10.

• Maine Sen. Susan Collins pays interns, according to a 2013 report by the Atlantic, but her campaign site does not list details. A spokesperson for her office didn’t respond to multiple requests for confirmation.

• North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven pays all interns a stipend. Applications close on March 15.

• Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe offers stipends to summer interns but not interns in the spring and fall. The deadline is March 15.

• South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott’s summer interns are unpaid, according to an email from a spokeswoman, but fall and spring interns are paid if their school does not offer credit. 

• Utah Sen. Mike Lee pays all interns a stipend, a press officer confirmed with Mic in an email. You can apply on a rolling basis through his website.

• Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso gives each intern a monthly stipend to help with living expenses. The deadline is March 19.

U.S. senators who have already closed applications for paid internships (18 total) 

Democrats 

• Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy offers stipends to some interns, but they are not guaranteed, according to his site.

Republicans 

• Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan pays interns a small stipend, but applications for this summer are closed.

• Arizona Sen. John McCain pays his interns, but applications are now closed. 

• Idaho Sen. Jim Risch pays interns, but the applications for the summer are now closed.

• Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton pays some qualified interns a stipend if they are not receiving academic credit, a spokeswoman confirmed in an email to Mic, but applications for this summer are currently closed.

• Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo pays all interns, but applications for the summer are now closed. 

• Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran pays all full-time interns, but the applications for the summer are now closed. 

• Maine Sen. Angus King pays all full-time interns in his office, a spokesman for his office confirmed in an email.

• Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran offers stipends.

• Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker pays all interns a stipend.

• Missouri Sen. Mitch McConnell pays all interns a stipend.
• Nebraska Sen. Deb Fischer pays fall interns but not summer interns. Applications for summer are now closed. 

• Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse pays all interns a stipend, according to a representative from his office who confirmed this to Mic by email. Applications for summer closed March 1.

• North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr pays a stipend to spring and fall interns but not interns who work during the summer, according to the Atlantic. His press office did not immediately respond to a request for clarification. Applications for the spring are now closed, but applications for the summer are still open.

• South Dakota Sen. Mark Rounds pays all interns a stipend, but applications for the summer are now closed. Applications for fall are due May 1.

• South Dakota Sen. John Thune pays interns a monthly stipend based on available funds, but applications are now closed. 

• Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch pays the summer interns in his D.C. office a “modest stipend,” but interns in his state office are part-time and unpaid.  

• Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi pays interns $1,600 to help cover the costs of living in D.C, but applications closed March 9th.

U.S. senators that do not pay their interns (50 total)

Democrats  

• California Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet’s Senate website says that internships are on a “voluntary basis” and that “no stipend is provided.” News reports also indicate the interns are unpaid. His office did not respond to request for comment. 

• Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman confirmed this was the case in an email to Mic

• Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Delaware Sen. Chris Coons does not compensate interns, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson for his office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.  

• Florida Sen. Bill Nelson’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson confirmed this in an email to Mic

• Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin’s interns are unpaid, a spokesman confirmed in an email to Mic

• Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey’s interns are unpaid, according to the Atlantic report, former alumni testimonials, and a job listing. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Michigan Sen. Gary Peters’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. Her office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Montana Sen. Jon Tester’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate site. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A representative for her office did not respond to request for comment. 

• New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker’s internship website makes no mention of compensation, but a spokesman confirmed the internships are unpaid. 

• New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

• New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman for her office confirmed this with Mic in an email.

• New York Sen. Chuck Schumer’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment.

• Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden’s interns are unpaid, according to the Senate website. A spokesman confirmed this with Mic in an email. 

• Rhode Island Sen. Jack Reed’s interns are unpaid according to reports in the Atlantic and the Providence Journalthough his Senate website does not obviously list information about intern compensation. A spokesman for the senator didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment.

• Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s interns are unpaid according to a 2013 Atlantic article. A spokesman for the senator confirmed the Atlantic story is still accurate in an email.

• Virginia Sen. Mark Warner’s interns are unpaid, according to the Atlantic and a recent job listing. His office didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. Representatives for her office didn’t respond to a request for comment. 

• Washington Sen. Patty Murray’s internships are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate site. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin’s internships are unpaid, according to the application listed on her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

Republicans  

• Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website, which cites budget restrictions. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Arkansas Sen. John Boozman’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Florida Sen. Marco Rubio’s Senate website lists no compensation for interns, but the Atlantic report and job listings indicate the roles are unpaid. A representative did not respond to request for comment. 

• Georgia Sen. David Perdue’s interns are unpaid, a member of his press office confirmed in a phone call to Mic

• Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson’s interns are unpaid, according to the online application and the Atlantic report. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst’s Senate website and application materials make no mention of compensation, neither does a recent press release calling for applications. The media contact listed on the press release didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley’s interns are unpaid, a spokeswoman confirmed to Mic in an email.

• Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy’s interns are unpaid, according to his campaign website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Montana Sen. Steve Daines’ internship page does not list any compensation, but a listing for the internship describes it as “volunteer” position. A representative for his office didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Nevada Sen. Dean Heller’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A representative didn’t respond to multiple request for comment.  

• North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis’ Senate website doesn’t indicate whether interns are paid or not, but job listings online say they are unpaid. A press representative didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Ohio Sen. Rob Portman’s interns are unpaid, a spokesman for his office confirmed over the phone.  

• Oklahoma Sen. James Lankford’s are unpaid according to his website. A spokesman confirmed this in an email to Mic

• Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker’s internship website doesn’t list any information about compensation, but job listings and news reports say the internships are unpaid. A representative for his office didn't respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Texas Sen. John Cornyn’s Senate website lists no compensation for interns, but job listings indicate the work is unpaid. The Atlantic also reported his interns are unpaid, but his office did not respond to multiple requests by Mic for comment. 

• Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t respond to Mic’s request for comment. 

• West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito’s Senate website lists no information about compensation, but job listings indicate the internships are unpaid. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson’s Senate website says that interns can receive college credit, but the Atlantic and job listings indicate the role is unpaid. A representative didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

A final note: In several cases, a senator’s website listed internships as unpaid, but after following up with their office, Mic learned that they do make funds available to certain interns through scholarships, travel assistance, or outside foundations. Also, many senators’ offices, whether they pay or not, help interns get college credit for their time spent working. If that means you can graduate sooner, or pay for one fewer class in a given semester, you’re technically not working for nothing. But giving interns college credits — without a stipend for living costs — still ignores what’s at the heart of Pay Our Interns’ point. As Vera put it himself, even the best learning experiences can’t pay the bills.

Read our full article which goes into more analysis (3/10/17 2:02 PM)

huffingtonpost.com
#AHCA (aka #Trumpcare) back from the dead? Some Republicans think they may have a health care deal
The reality is they may be even further away from an Obamacare replacement than before.

Matt Fuller and Jonathan Cohn at HuffPost Politics:

WASHINGTON ― GOP moderates and conservatives are nearing a deal on health care that in theory could get the Republican alternative to the Affordable Care Act out of the House and over to the Senate. The changes also might move Republicans even further away from passage ― no one really knows.

The deal, brokered between House Freedom Caucus chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Tuesday Group co-chairman Tom MacArthur (R-N.J.), would allow states to get waivers eliminating the so-called community rating provision ― the rule that prohibits insurers from charging higher premiums to people with pre-existing conditions. In order to obtain the waiver, states would have to participate in a federal high-risk pool or establish their own, and satisfy some other conditions.

In exchange for that conservative concession, the amendment would reinstate the Essential Health Benefits that were already taken out of the bill ― though, again, states could waive those provisions as well if they were able to show that doing so would lower premiums, increase the number of people insured, or “advance another benefit to the public interest in the state.”

That’s according to a white paper describing the amendment, which is the result of weeks of negotiation between Meadows and MacArthur. While they have both agreed to the amendment, supposedly representing a number of conservatives and moderates respectively, the amendment is still being reviewed by the Senate and House GOP leadership.

Additionally, with Republicans effectively going back on their repeated promises to guarantee coverage for people with pre-existing conditions, the amendment could lose a number of Republicans who already supported the legislation. In short, even though the Tuesday Group and the Freedom Caucus think they have a deal, Republicans writ large might have nothing.

Leadership is expected to discuss the amendment on a conference call this Saturday with GOP members, but public opinion might also affect the landscape. Republicans are trying to say their amendment will cover people with pre-existing conditions ― because, first, the legislation still claims those people can’t be denied coverage, and second, because there will be high-risk pools for those people if insurance costs dramatically go up for them.

The reality, however, is that insurers would be able to effectively deny coverage by pricing sick people out of the market.

“This effectively allows states to eliminate the ACA’s guarantee of access to insurance at a reasonable price for people with pre-existing conditions, in the interest of lowering premiums for people who are healthy,” Larry Levitt, senior vice president at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, said upon seeing a description of the proposal. “It seems to tilt heavily towards what the Freedom Caucus has been looking for.”

Republicans argue that the high-risk pools would then cover those people, taking them out of the regular insurance pool and lowering prices for everyone else, but high-risk pools have traditionally been underfunded by states and the federal government, resulting in poor coverage and high costs for those who need insurance the most.

Those concerns may be significant enough that, even with MacArthur’s blessing, the deal does not win over moderates. The concessions also might not be enough for some conservatives, who have expressed issue with Republicans establishing an advance refundable tax credit to help pay for insurance.

Republicans need 216 votes to pass their health care bill, and based on statements from GOP members, even with the support of the entire Freedom Caucus for the amendment, there may be enough moderate hold-outs to prevent passage anyway. (MacArthur doesn’t count as a convert; he supported the last bill, albeit reluctantly.)

The amendment wouldn’t seem to address the big concerns moderates have expressed ― like raising the cap on how much insurers can charge seniors or cutting $880 billion from Medicaid. These changes are among the reasons that the Congressional Budget Office predicted the House health care legislation would increase the number of people without insurance by 24 million within a decade.

Many Republicans ― particularly in the Senate ― have said such deep cuts are not acceptable. Just this week, Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) said he couldn’t support a proposal that jeopardized coverage for the approximately 300,000 people in his state dependent on the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion.

Public opinion has also shifted since the repeal effort began in earnest ― and it has shifted decisively against Republicans and their cause. The Affordable Care Act is more popular than ever, and in a recent Pew Research Center poll, 54 percent of Americans said they trusted Democrats more than Republicans on health care, while just 35 percent said they trusted Republicans more. That’s the biggest advantage for Democrats on health care since 2009.

In short, some leaders in the GOP conference might think they have a deal, but they also might have just found a way to make the bill even more unpalatable for Republicans, thus bringing Congress no closer at all.

Still, Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) suggested that Republicans were getting close to a deal. “We’re in the midst of negotiating sort of finishing touches,” Ryan said Wednesday during a trip to London.

Seems like the GOP’s trying for #AHCA 2.0 (aka #Trumpcare 2.0). Just like the first try, it’ll fail.

It’s 9:55pm on a Tuesday night

A group of 10 teenage girls come into the restaurant.

“What time do you guys close?”

I say, “We close at 10:00pm”

She replies, “table for ten please”

A little frustrated (because I’m not a fucking hostess/server) I seat them and inform them that a server will be with them shortly.
I have to go to the back and retrieve a server who just got her tips from the day and is packing up to go home.

“_____, we have a table of ten for you..”

She started to cry because she had been there since we OPENED that morning and hadn’t seen her babies that day.

Obviously she’s angry too, and it shows.
But she’s still attentive to the young ladies.

They don’t get up from the table until almost 11:00 and come to the front to pay.

“Our server was a bitch”
“Our server was mean”
“Our server didn’t like us”

“Your server just wanted to go home an hour ago,” I say.

“It’s her job, she’s getting paid, so what?”

I let them know that she’s worked hard today and wanted to be able to see her kids before her husband tucks them in bed.

They pay, leave no tip for her, and leave the building.

The moral of the story is that it’s not “cute” or “cool” to go to restaurants late at night right before they close.
Workers want to go home.
Workers want to see their families.
Workers want to get sleep so they can do it all over again tomorrow.

It doesn’t matter if you’re rude or polite.

When we say that we close at 10:00pm, we would really like to ACTUALLY close at 10:00pm. And even if you leave RIGHT AT closing, that server still has to clean up after you.
Make sure the table is clean, make sure the floor is clean, make sure the dishes are clean and put away, make sure they have their tips, and get a manager to walk them to their car.

We don’t care about your $3 tip.
We want to go home.

6

Tsukiyo’s style returning with Keima and friends!

One of the most interesting and/or challenging thing about this style was restricting myself to a palette of five colors ONLY:

  1. Black
  2. White
  3. Hair color
  4. The character color
  5. The color opposite of the character’s color

It made me have to think a while to make sure the outfits were coordinated well!

3

Leaked email details the diversity initiative Apple’s board urged the company to reject

  • During Apple’s shareholder meeting on Tuesday, the group will decide the fate of a proposal pushing for an “accelerated recruitment policy” to diversify the company’s board of directors and senior management.
  • This is the second straight year investors floated the proposal.
  • It comes at a time when Apple, like many other tech giants, is taking big steps toward more equal representation within the company.
  • But thanks to Apple’s own leaders, it’s not likely this proposal will pass.
  • Apple’s board — a group dominated by white men — have pushed the company to reject the initiative, one that would diversify its also predominantly white male leadership team.
  • Furthermore, a shareholder’s email obtained by Mic reveals that Apple has not responded to a request from an investor to work toward an agreement on the initiative. Read more (2/23/17 8:00 AM)

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Shiori is here is style 23 - together with her books!

Shiori’s was definitely a blast to experiment with. Having the pages float around with quotes coming out of them was definitely a challenge, though thankfully I had a friend help me out with finding some choice passages to use :> I also used some song lyrics - see if you can recognize anything ,’:3c

Playing around with the light in this one to make it sort of mystical was really fun!

6

Kids Share Some F**ked Up Facts About The Confederate Flag

These kids are decrying the Confederate flag in the best way ever: by telling us all the horrible stuff it represents. In a video posted to YouTube Tuesday, a group of young boys and girls get together to express how fed up they are “with this whitewashing of America’s dark past.”

Watch the full video for all five f**ked up facts.

One month in...

I’m one month into weight watchers. Here are some thoughts.

Their dietitians and nutritionists have come out of the dark ages. Every meeting I’ve been to, the talk is always protein. It’s refreshing and awesome.

Also, there is talk of moderation - no more telling people to restrict at all costs.

I like the Tuesday morning group better than the Tuesday evening group, but will continue to alternate based on my schedule.

There’s not as much pressure as there used to be.

And all the goddamn fruit. Yes.

laskulls  asked:

yaaay okay! ooh i have a srs question. darren, how do u feel about mages and templars?

Darren: Mages and templars? Well, I mean… I don’t really know a whole lot about all of that. I never met any of either growing up. But so far… no one has made me feel scared or anything. I’d be friends with them, so long as they were nice people. 

We’ve got a bunch of templars working for the Inquisition now, and they seem all right. Some of our mages were upset about them joining us, and I’ve heard bits and pieces of stories, so I can understand why. But the people here with us? I can’t say any of them are bad just because they’re a mage or a templar. Nervous around each other, maybe, but there hasn’t been any fighting or nastiness so far.  

That seems… well, like a good first step. If we can work it out here, maybe we can work it out elsewhere too, y’know? Or maybe I’m just being naive again. I keep getting told that I am. I just want to believe we can all do better. That’s the whole point, isn’t it? To do better?

Almost feels like training again

So after running a 5k last Saturday and then resting on Sunday, I started to tackle the 5th week of the McMillan Rebuild Fitness Plan. This plan keeps me on easy miles, but it very gradually ramps up the distance, until the long run hits about 90 minutes in duration.

Monday - 5 miles easy, and I threw in a couple of post run striders. Weights later in the day.

Tuesday - I ended up running twice, something not in the plan. First I coached at my high school team’s practice and ran about 3.4 miles. Then I headed over to Life Time in Fairfax, where I will be a run coach over the summer (some of you may recall I had the same job at Life Time Centreville a year or two ago). I ran with the Tuesday Social Run group at the club for another 4.

Wednesday - not surprisingly, given the previous day’s miles and the hot conditions, I felt sapped of energy and almost bagged it, but I willed myself out the door for another 5 miler. Pace was slow but the objective of getting some recovery was met.

Thursday - the plan gave the option for a crosstraining day and I took it. Biked the nearly 13 miles to practice and then home afterwards. The ride out felt great, the ride home was a slog.

Tomorrow, it looks like another 5 or so. Then on Saturday comes the “long” run, long being somewhere between 60-70 minutes. Bottom line I should hit 30 miles for the week. That may not sound like much, especially for someone who has run 14 marathons, but it is the most I will have done in any week in over five months. And I’ll take that as a sign of progress. McMillan works!

But now, time for bed.