tudor manor house

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More photos found clearing out old files, this is Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, and its one of my favourite old houses to visit, its so compact and quirky. It is a moated half-timbered manor house not far from me actually and the earliest parts of the house were built for the prosperous Cheshire landowner William Moreton in about 1504–08, and the remainder was constructed in stages by successive generations of the family until about 1610. The building is highly irregular, with three asymmetrical ranges forming a small, rectangular cobbled courtyard. The house remained in the possession of the Moreton family for almost 450 years, until ownership was transferred to the National Trust in 1938. Little Moreton Hall and its sandstone bridge across the moat are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building, and the ground on which Little Moreton Hall stands is protected as a Scheduled Monument.

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“This incredible sculpture by Turner Prize-winning artist Anthony Gormley, consisting of 40,000 clay figures, has been put on display at an empty Tudor manor house.

It took five days to place the humanoid characters into position  across the ground floor of Barrington Court, a National Trust Property near Ilminster in Somerset.” (dailymail.co.uk)

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4,000 Houses for 4,000 Followers: No. 48: 

Layer Marney Tower, Essex, England. 

Dating from the reign of Henry VIII, it is England’s tallest Tudor gatehouse. 

Photos: Country Life. 

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Little Moreton Hall. Congleton. Cheshire. by Els
Via Flickr:
We visited Little Moreton Hall. Congleton. Cheshire. Little Moreton Hall’s south wing, constructed c. 1570. The weight of the third-storey glazed gallery, possibly added at a late stage of the construction, has caused the lower floors to bow and warp under the weight of glass, timber, and gritstone slates Little Moreton Hall is a moated 15th and 16th-century half-timbered manor house 4 miles (6.4 km) southwest of Congleton, Cheshire. It is one of the finest examples of timber-framed domestic architecture in England. The house is today owned by the National Trust. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building, and is protected as a Scheduled Monument. So picturesque is the house that it has been described as “a ginger bread house lifted straight from a fairy story”. The earliest parts of the house were built for the prosperous Cheshire landowner Sir Richard de Moreton around 1450; the remainder was constructed in various campaigns by three successive generations of the family until around 1580. The house remained in the ownership of the Moreton family for almost five centuries. The building is highly irregular, with asymmetrical façades that ramble around three sides of a small cobbled courtyard, with “bays and porches jostling each other for space”.

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Kentwell Hall by hillsymay

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(via Happy Wall Wednesday | by Steve Everett | Flickr)