tübingen

Die Lorelei is a rock on the eastern bank of the Rhine near St. Goarshausen in Rheinland-Pfalz, Southwestern Germany, which soars 120 m above the waterline. It marks the narrowest part of the river between Switzerland and the North Sea. It’s the most famous feature of the Rhein Gorge, a 65 km section of the river between Koblenz and Bingen that was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002. Strong currents and rocks below the waterline have caused many boat accidents. In German mythology, Lorelei is also the name of a feminine water spirit, similar to mermaids or Rhinemaidens, associated with this rock in popular folklore. They appear in works of music, art, and literature. 

The name comes from the old German words lureln, local dialect for “murmuring”. The heavy currents and a small waterfall created a murmuring sound and this combined with the echo the rock produces to act as a sort of amplifier, giving the rock its name. The murmuring is hard to hear today owing to traffic and the urbanization of the area. In a story of an enchanting female associated with the rock, the beautiful Lore Lay, betrayed by her sweetheart, is accused of bewitching men and causing their death. Rather than sentence her to death, the bishop consigns her to a nunnery. On the way there, accompanied by 3 knights, she comes to the Lorelei rock. She asks permission to climb it and view the Rhine one more time, does so, and falls to her death; the rock still retaining an echo of her name afterwards. In 1824, Heinrich Heine adapted the theme in one of his most famous poems, “Die Lorelei”. It describes the eponymous female as a sort of siren who, sitting on the cliff above the Rhine and combing her golden hair, unwittingly distracts shipmen with her beauty and song, causing them to crash on the rocks. In 1837 Heine’s lyrics were set to music by Friedrich Silcher in the art song Lorelei that became well known. A setting by Franz Liszt was also favored. The theme has appeared in countless poems, musical compositions, and literary works since. A list here

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but maybe we’re home by lina zelonka
Via Flickr:

anonymous asked:

I noticed you post classical songs sometimes and I wondered what are some of your all time favorites? :)

Hi. Thanks for this question—

Claude Debussy - La fille aux cheveux de lin
Henryk Gorecki - Symphony No. 3
Allegri - Miserere mei, Deus
Richard Einhorn - Pater Noster
Richard Einhorn - Torture
La Monte Young - The Well Tuned Piano
Igor Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring  
Erik Satie - Gymnopédies & Gnossiennes
Arnold Schoenberg - Verklärte Nacht, Op.4
Richard Wagner - Tristan und Isolde
Arvo Pärt - The Beatitudes
Arvo Pärt - Magnificat
Arvo Pärt - Summa for Strings
Arvo Pärt - Silentium
Worrytrain - White Phosphorus Angels
Worrytrain - For Auschwitz
Zbigniew Preisner - Van den Budenmayer
Morton Feldman - Rothko Chapel
John Tavener - Funeral Canticle
John Tavener - Mother and Child
John Tavener - Fragments of a Prayer 
Frederic Chopin - Complete Nocturnes
Franz Liszt - Liebestraum No 3 in A flat
György Ligeti - Atmospheres
Sergei Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 2
Sergei Rachmaninoff - Isle of the Dead
Hildegard von Bingen - O Vis Aeterniatis
Philip Glass - Glassworks
Max Richter - Sarajevo
Max Richter - November
Max Richter - Lines on a Page (One Hundred Violins)

Die Drosselgasse in Rüdesheim am Rhein in Hessen, Central Germany. You will find pubs and wine bars here, very romantic place. :)

It’s a winemaking town in the Rhine Gorge and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. The area was settled first by the Celts, then after the turn of the Christian Era by Ubii; later by Mattiaci. In the 1st century, the Romans pushed forth to the Taunus. In Bingen they built a castrum; on the other side, near what is now Rüdesheim, lay a bridgehead on the way to the Limes. The Romans were followed by the Alamanni, and with the Migration Period (Völkerwanderung) came the Franks. Archaeological finds of glass from this time suggest that there was already winegrowing happening then. The town had its first documentary mention in 1074.

Underneath all the texts, all the sacred psalms and canticles, these watery varieties of sounds and silences, terrifying, mysterious, whirling and sometimes gestating and gentle must somehow be felt in the pulse, ebb, and flow of the music that sings in me. My new song must float like a feather on the breath of God.
—  Hildegard of Bingen
Underneath all the texts, all the sacred psalms and canticles, these watery varieties of sounds and silences, terrifying, mysterious, whirling and sometimes gestating and gentle must somehow be felt in the pulse, ebb, and flow of the music that sings in me. My new song must float like a feather on the breath of God.
—  Hildegard of Bingen, from ‘The Letters of Hildegard of Bingen’
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Supposed to be practicing a song this eve but just sat and listened to Hildgard instead because it’s so ridiculously gorgeous. 

The truly holy person welcomes all that is earthly. Glance at the sun. See the moon and the stars. Gaze at the beauty of earth’s greenings. All nature is at the disposal of humankind. We are to work with it. For without we cannot survive.
—  Hildegard Von Bingen