tsardom

The Romanov Children. 

“… The next poor idiot to hit the Russian throne was Michael Romanov, whose descendants held onto it with an iron fist until the Communists shot them.  The Romanov dynasty was uneventful until Peter the Great, who decided to copy the west and forced all the nobles to shave and learn French.  He also pwned the Church.  Everybody hated him.  His grandson was a drunk and let his wife Catherine rule the country.  She was called ‘The Great,’ too.  This is because Russian historieans aren’t very imaginative.  They could have called her 'Catherine the Slut.’”

-ED

The Russian Revolution

Today we are going to talk about the transition of imperialist Russia to the USSR, so let’s go far away, long ago to the early 20th century Russia.

Originally posted by pactressia

Russia had been governed by the Romanov dynasty for 300 years when the revolution spiked, resentment against the house of Romanov had been building since the embarrassing defeat in the Russo-Japanese  war of 1904 then in 1905 the Bloody Sunday happened, the army was ordered to fire against unarmed protesters, the economy was really bad and people had a huge dislike for the WWI. The Tsar Nicholas II tried to calm people by creating the Duma, a sort of parliament, and by trying to become a constitutional monarchy as stated in the October Manifesto but then he sort of ignore it and tried to dissolve the Duma. This along with his insistence on personally taking charge of the armed forces in WWI despite being completely clueless at it, had people really mad at him. The tsardom had prevailed because the bureaucracy and the army backed him up but even them began to think he should rule no more.

Grigory Rasputin’s part in the Russian Revolution has been debated, once Aleksandr Kerensky (we will talk about him later) said “if there had been no Rasputin, there would have been no Lenin”. Rasputin was a mystic who came to the Romanov house after the empress was assured he could cure her son’s illness, Prince Alexei was born with hemophilia.

Originally posted by memory-of-the-romanovs

 Later he influenced the empress decisions while the Tsar was away. He was murdered in December 1916.

The Romanov family was obviously wealthy and it made a great contrast with the real situation of most of the russians at the time. The Tsar’s family was composed of his wife Alexandra, his 4 daughters Olga, Maria, Tatiana, Anastasia and his son Alexei.By this time the photograph had already been invented so starving people got to see the family’s fancy way of living and that probably caused even more resentment towards the monarchy.

Originally posted by beeintheattic

Then in 1917 the February Revolution started,  it was actually on March but the calendars were different back then. A provisional government was established with Aleksandr Kerensky and the Tsar abdicated in his and his son’s name, the family remained captured. The new government decided it would be unhonorable of Russia to back down from the war, even though it had been pretty unsustainable from the beginning, many soldiers were thrown to the battle field without a weapon and were told to take one from a dead body when possible. Another challenge were the soviets, this were councils of representatives from the soldiers and the workers, sort of like a labour union. They represented the interest of the lower classes.

The bolsheviks (which btw means majority) began as a Marxist party called Russian Social Democrats and their leader was Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, he believed a true revolution could only be achieved by a violent revolution. He had spent the early years of the 20th century abroad but when the provisional government was formed German leaders trying to create a mess in Russia shipped him back in a sealed train so his ideas wouldn’t “infect” Germany.The Bolsheviks promised to end the war and redistribute land t the peasants. The 3 slogans were “Peace, Land, Bread” , “Worker control of production” and “All power to the Soviets”. They had a counterpart, the Mensheviks, they were leaded by Julius Martov and were moderate marxist.

Then the October revolution began (it was actually in November) the Bolsheviks seized the Winter palace and the government collapsed. Aleksandr Kerensky escaped to New York but many others were killed or imprisoned. Now Lenin was the new head of the state.The Bolsheviks, who had renamed themselves the Communists,had to make the treaty of Brest-Litovsk to get out of the war. It was signed in 1918 with Germany and Russia was forced to give away eastern Poland, Finland, Ukraine and the Baltic provinces but Lenin was sure that this territories will be regained when the socialist revolution spread there.

 But not everyone agreed with Lenin’s ideas, many were alienated against the new Communist government, among them were the ones still loyal to the Tsar and the anti-Leninist socialists, they were supported by the Allies. Between 1918 and 1921 the Civil war spiked in Russia and as the White (anti-leninist) army advanced the red army (communist) decided to move the Tsar and his family to Yekaterinburg, they feared the White army would put the Tsar back on the throne so in July 16 they were murdered. The Tsar and his family were moved to the basement in the house they were being held in and the guards who were in charge of them fired, the girls had hidden their jewelry on the back of her corsets so the bullets didn’t got passed it, the guards had to murder them with swords. Then the bodies were burned in a mine nearby and two bodies were buried separated in case of being found no one would think they were the Romanovs. This is why many people thought the youngest girl, Anastasia, had been able to escape.It is important to remember that the Romanovs were only some of the many deaths during this revolution and the deaths would continue through the totalitarian government that was established.

The Red Army won the Civil War, they had Leon Trotsky as their leader and he was REALLY strict, soldiers who deserted or refused to obey were immediately executed.

Meanwhile the White Army was a mess with no common goal.The Communists also had the Cheka, the Red secret police, who basically made life a living hell for anyone who was even just suspected of not sharing their communist ideas, this was also the job of the Gulag, this were forced labor camps in the coldest parts of Russia, this were not installed until Stalin came to power.By 1922 the Communist were completely established and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was created , Lenin died in 1924 and was succeeded by Joseph Stalin who led a horrible regime of death and collective terror.

Originally posted by walruswasringo

trvedignity asked:

Monachopsis

                                   ( meme. accepting !! )

Monachopsis: The subtle but persistent feeling of being out of place.

        STRANGE IS THE sensation of being a stranger in her own home. Stranger still, the sudden coldness in the room– in the eyes of the soldiers who’d once guarded her family with nothing but respect and kindness– that rivals even Russia’s harshest winters. 

        Anastasia keeps herself busy as best she can. Under Mama’s instruction, she sews jewels into her clothes; her coats, her petticoats, dresses, skirts, blouses; inlaying them in pockets and corsets— anywhere a jewel would fit, she sews it in place. Hidden. Out of sight. It’s a PRECAUTION, Mama says. The Provisional Government, led by Alexander Kerensky, has taken everything. Papa’s Tsardom, their palace, many of their belongings have been ransacked and taken as though the Romanovs no longer have any right to their own personal items. In some ways, maybe they don’t. The state of things in Russia is fragile at best, with all the blame falling to Papa because he is the Tsar— the Ex-Tsar. Ex-tyrant.

        One afternoon as she joins her mother in the sitting room— one of the few rooms they are allowed to move freely in— a couple of soldiers enter. Their heavy boots echo in the hallways and grating, thick voices boom over the silence. Anastasia squints at them, rising to her feet as they regard the Empress ( Ex-Empress ) with a look not altogether kind. Instinctively, she grabs her mother’s hand. There’s a tremor, but Anastasia says nothing of it. She must be strong. For both of them. 

        ❝Comrade Romanov—-❞

        Anastasia is quick to cut the soldier off.  ❝EMPRESS. My mother is the Empress. And I,❞ she lifts her chin high.  ❝—am the GRAND DUCHESS. You should address us as so.❞ She never used to give much thought to her title. Back at the palace in St. Petersburg ( Petrograd, she silently reminds herself ), the servants and tutors had always referred to her by name. It felt more familiar that way. Here, though, she has no qualms about appearing as the Grand Duchess she rightfully is.

        The soldier grimaces. For half a moment, he looks like he wants to strike her. ❝That might have been true before, but your father has abdicated the throne. Under the new Provisional Government, we are ALL equal now, Comrade Romanov.❞

        Equal my foot.

      Another few words are exchanged. The soldiers have been ordered by Kerensky to tighten the restrictions on the Imperial Family. They leave shortly after the information is relayed. 

        Later, when Anastasia and her mother join the rest of her family for supper, it is a quiet, solemn meal. It seems they’ve all resigned themselves to their fate. The Ex-tyrant with his Ex-Empress and their four Ex-Grand Duchesses and Ex-Tsarevich. 

        Over a cigar, Nicholas murmurs.  ❝Tak i byt.❞ So be it.

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.

Early Imperial Russia
Dr Adrian Jones
Genre: European History
Price: Get
Publish Date: February 26, 2014

In this subject, students examine the emergence, consolidation and development of Russian state and society in a hitherto wild region in eastern Europe. The formative phase in the political, social and intellectual history of the Tsardom of Muscovy is traced. The focus is on the interplay of strange dichotomies like those between autocracy and oligarchy, patriarchy and communalism, xenophobia and Westernism, in shaping Russian state, society and culture in the turbulent era of Ivan the Terrible.

© 2013 La Trobe University

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.

Peter the Great - Jacob Abbott | Biographies & Memoirs |511100944

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.

Early Imperial Russia
Dr Adrian Jones
Genre: European History
Price: Get
Publish Date: February 26, 2014

In this subject, students examine the emergence, consolidation and development of Russian state and society in a hitherto wild region in eastern Europe. The formative phase in the political, social and intellectual history of the Tsardom of Muscovy is traced. The focus is on the interplay of strange dichotomies like those between autocracy and oligarchy, patriarchy and communalism, xenophobia and Westernism, in shaping Russian state, society and culture in the turbulent era of Ivan the Terrible.

© 2013 La Trobe University

Peter the Great - Jacob Abbott | Biographies & Memoirs |511100944

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.

Peter the Great - Jacob Abbott | Biographies & Memoirs |511100944

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.

Early Imperial Russia
Dr Adrian Jones
Genre: European History
Price: Get
Publish Date: February 26, 2014

In this subject, students examine the emergence, consolidation and development of Russian state and society in a hitherto wild region in eastern Europe. The formative phase in the political, social and intellectual history of the Tsardom of Muscovy is traced. The focus is on the interplay of strange dichotomies like those between autocracy and oligarchy, patriarchy and communalism, xenophobia and Westernism, in shaping Russian state, society and culture in the turbulent era of Ivan the Terrible.

© 2013 La Trobe University

Peter the Great, Peter I or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Рома́нов, Пётр I, Pyotr I, or Пётр Вели́кий, Pyotr Velikiy) (9 June  1672 – 8 February  1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May  1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his half-brother. In numerous successful wars he expanded the Tsardom into a huge empire that became a major European power.

Peter the Great
Jacob Abbott
Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
Price: Get
Publish Date: January 1, 1879

A comprehensive account of the life of ‘the founder of Russian civilization’.