truth! justice! freedom! reasonably priced love! and a hard boiled egg!

The Glorious Twenty-Fifth of May.

The 25th of May is quietly celebrated by the survivors of the People’s Revolution, which ended the reign of Lord Winder. They wear a sprig of lilac and gather at the Small Gods Cemetery to honour the Watchmen who fell: Cecil Clapman, Ned Coates, Dai Dickins, John Keel, Horace Nancyball, Billy Wiglet, and (albeit temporarily) Reg Shoe.

In the Round world (following Terry Pratchett’s diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease), Match It For Pratchett has called on fans to wear lilacs on 25 May in support of Terry.

The slogan of the People’s Revolution is “Truth, Justice, Freedom, Reasonably Priced Love, and a Hard-Boiled Egg!”

Supposing there was justice for all, after all? For every unheeded beggar, every harsh word, every neglected duty, every slight… every choice… Because that was the point, wasn’t it? You had to choose. You might be right, you might be wrong, but you had to choose, knowing that the rightness or wrongness might never be clear or even that you were deciding between two sorts of wrong, and there was no right anywhere. And always, always, you did it by yourself. You were the one there, on the edge, watching and listening. Never any tears, never any apology, never any regrets… You saved all that up in a way that could be used when needed.
—  Terry Pratchett, Carpe Jugulum

Do you know why I wear the lilac today?

Homestuck has its 4/13, Star Wars its May the Fourth, LOTR its September 22. We in the Discworld fandom have the Glorious 25th of May.

In Ankh-Morpork on the Discworld, those who fought in the Glorious Revolution (which gloriously lost) wear lilac today in remembrance of companions fallen.

In the fandom, we wear lilac today in remembrance of all Terry Pratchett did and continues to do: for teaching us about life and about death and how we need to love both, about anger and about joy and how you ought to have some of each, about stories and about the real world and how they’re not so separate as one might appear, about learning with your head and your heart and your hands, about using technology and about living with people, about the evil we have done and the good we can do, about how a man’s not dead while his name’s still spoken, and about trying to stand up for the old slogan - “Truth! Justice! Freedom! Reasonably-priced love! And a hard-boiled egg!”

So, to my followers (and my god, there’s more than a hundred of  you, how did that happen, I love you all) - if you don’t read Terry Pratchett, I highly recommend that you do, and that next year, you’ll also wear the lilac.

GNU

2

“…A huge wreath of lilac flowers, bound with purple ribbon, had been placed on the grave. On top of it, tied round with another piece of purple ribbon, was an egg…”

“…Lilac was common in the city. It was vigorous and hard to kill and had to be… “

“…The lilac was going to bloom. The revolution was going to happen…“

“…‘So what’s wrong with a lilac flower?’ said Dickins, reaching up and pulling down a laden branch. 'Makes a spanking plume, even if you can’t eat it…’…”

“… And they outnumbered the lilac lads two to one…“

“…I joined the fight. I snatched up a lilac bloom from a fallen man and, I have to say, held it in my mouth. I’d like to think I made some difference;…”

“…The men with the lilac, I have to say, fought like tigers…“

“…’-I can give you back Treacle Mine Road…In memory of John Keel, a man who in a few short days changed the lives of many and, perhaps, saved some sanity in a mad world”

“…And then he went home. And the world turned towards morning…”

I miss you Sir Terry Pratchett. <3

Your books give us back the memory of you, a man who with his books changed the lives of many and, perhaps, saved some sanity in a mad world.

Well…a kind of revolution. That wasn’t really the word for what it was. There was the People’s Republic of Treacle Mine Road (Truth! Freedom! Justice! Reasonably priced love! And a hard-boiled egg!) that would live for all of a few hours, a strange candle that burned too briefly and died like a firework.
—  Night Watch, Terry Pratchett
Well… a kind of revolution. That wasn’t really a word for what it was. There was the People’s Republic of Treacle Mine Road (Truth! Justice! Freedom! Reasonably Priced Love! And a Hard-Boiled Egg!), which would live for all of a few hours, a strange candle that burned too briefly and died like a firework.
—  Terry Pratchett, Night Watch